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Author Falcon, J.; Torriglia, A.; Attia, D.; Vienot, F.; Gronfier, C.; Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Hicks, D.
Title Exposure to Artificial Light at Night and the Consequences for Flora, Fauna, and Ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front Neurosci
Volume 14 Issue Pages 602796
Keywords Review; Animals; Plants; Ecology; anthropogenic impact; artificial-light-at-night; biological clocks; ecosystems; light-emitting-diodes; photoreception
Abstract The present review draws together wide-ranging studies performed over the last decades that catalogue the effects of artificial-light-at-night (ALAN) upon living species and their environment. We provide an overview of the tremendous variety of light-detection strategies which have evolved in living organisms – unicellular, plants and animals, covering chloroplasts (plants), and the plethora of ocular and extra-ocular organs (animals). We describe the visual pigments which permit photo-detection, paying attention to their spectral characteristics, which extend from the ultraviolet into infrared. We discuss how organisms use light information in a way crucial for their development, growth and survival: phototropism, phototaxis, photoperiodism, and synchronization of circadian clocks. These aspects are treated in depth, as their perturbation underlies much of the disruptive effects of ALAN. The review goes into detail on circadian networks in living organisms, since these fundamental features are of critical importance in regulating the interface between environment and body. Especially, hormonal synthesis and secretion are often under circadian and circannual control, hence perturbation of the clock will lead to hormonal imbalance. The review addresses how the ubiquitous introduction of light-emitting diode technology may exacerbate, or in some cases reduce, the generalized ever-increasing light pollution. Numerous examples are given of how widespread exposure to ALAN is perturbing many aspects of plant and animal behaviour and survival: foraging, orientation, migration, seasonal reproduction, colonization and more. We examine the potential problems at the level of individual species and populations and extend the debate to the consequences for ecosystems. We stress, through a few examples, the synergistic harmful effects resulting from the impacts of ALAN combined with other anthropogenic pressures, which often impact the neuroendocrine loops in vertebrates. The article concludes by debating how these anthropogenic changes could be mitigated by more reasonable use of available technology – for example by restricting illumination to more essential areas and hours, directing lighting to avoid wasteful radiation and selecting spectral emissions, to reduce impact on circadian clocks. We end by discussing how society should take into account the potentially major consequences that ALAN has on the natural world and the repercussions for ongoing human health and welfare.
Address Inserm, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Integratives, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1662-453X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33304237; PMCID:PMC7701298 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3245
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Author Hozer, C.; Perret, M.; Pavard, S.; Pifferi, F.
Title Survival is reduced when endogenous period deviates from 24 h in a non-human primate, supporting the circadian resonance theory Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 18002
Keywords Animals
Abstract Circadian rhythms are ubiquitous attributes across living organisms and allow the coordination of internal biological functions with optimal phases of the environment, suggesting a significant adaptive advantage. The endogenous period called tau lies close to 24 h and is thought to be implicated in individuals' fitness: according to the circadian resonance theory, fitness is reduced when tau gets far from 24 h. In this study, we measured the endogenous period of 142 mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus), and analyzed how it is related to their survival. We found different effects according to sex and season. No impact of tau on mortality was found in females. However, in males, the deviation of tau from 24 h substantially correlates with an increase in mortality, particularly during the inactive season (winter). These results, comparable to other observations in mice or drosophila, show that captive gray mouse lemurs enjoy better fitness when their circadian period closely matches the environmental periodicity. In addition to their deep implications in health and aging research, these results raise further ecological and evolutionary issues regarding the relationships between fitness and circadian clock.
Address Unite Mecanismes Adaptatifs et Evolution, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, 1 Avenue du Petit Chateau, 91800, Brunoy, France. fabien.pifferi@mnhn.fr
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33093578; PMCID:PMC7582969 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3244
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Author Hozer, C.; Pifferi, F.
Title Physiological and cognitive consequences of a daily 26 h photoperiod in a primate: exploring the underlying mechanisms of the circadian resonance theory Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 287 Issue 1931 Pages 20201079
Keywords Animals; Body Temperature; Cheirogaleidae/*physiology; Circadian Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Cognition; Male; Motor Activity; Photoperiod; Vibration; *circadian clock resonance; *cognition; *physiological costs; *synchronization
Abstract The biological clock expresses circadian rhythms, whose endogenous period (tau) is close to 24 h. Daily resetting of the circadian clock to the 24 h natural photoperiod might induce marginal costs that would accumulate over time and forward affect fitness. It was proposed as the circadian resonance theory. For the first time, we aimed to evaluate these physiological and cognitive costs that would partially explain the mechanisms of the circadian resonance hypothesis. We evaluated the potential costs of imposing a 26 h photoperiodic regimen compared to the classical 24 h entrainment measuring several physiological and cognitive parameters (body temperature, energetic expenditure, oxidative stress, cognitive performances) in males of a non-human primate (Microcebus murinus), a nocturnal species whose endogenous period is about 23.5 h. We found significant higher resting body temperature and energy expenditure and lower cognitive performances when the photoperiodic cycle length was 26 h. Together these results suggest that a great deviation of external cycles from tau leads to daily greater energetic expenditure, and lower cognitive capacities. To our knowledge, this study is the first to highlight potential mechanisms of circadian resonance theory.
Address UMR CNRS MNHN 7179 MECADEV, 1 Avenue du Petit Chateau 91800 Brunoy, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32693726; PMCID:PMC7423648 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3243
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Author Wilson, R.; Wakefield, A.; Roberts, N.; Jones, G.
Title Artificial light and biting flies: the parallel development of attractive light traps and unattractive domestic lights Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Parasites & Vectors Abbreviated Journal Parasit Vectors
Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 28
Keywords Animals; Human Health; Diptera; Light attraction; Phototaxis; Spectral wavelength preferences; Vector
Abstract Light trapping is an important tool for monitoring insect populations. This is especially true for biting Diptera, where light traps play a crucial role in disease surveillance by tracking the presence and abundance of vector species. Physiological and behavioural data have been instrumental in identifying factors that influence dipteran phototaxis and have spurred the development of more effective light traps. However, the development of less attractive domestic lights has received comparatively little interest but could be important for reducing interactions between humans and vector insects, with consequences for reducing disease transmission. Here, we discuss how dipteran eyes respond to light and the factors influencing positive phototaxis, and conclude by identifying key areas for further research. In addition, we include a synthesis of attractive and unattractive wavelengths for a number of vector species. A more comprehensive understanding of how Diptera perceive and respond to light would allow for more efficient vector sampling as well as potentially limiting the risk posed by domestic lighting.
Address School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Life Sciences Building, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1756-3305 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33413591; PMCID:PMC7789162 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3242
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Author Li, F.; Li, E.; Zhang, C.; Samat, A.; Liu, W.; Li, C.; Atkinson, P.
Title Estimating Artificial Impervious Surface Percentage in Asia by Fusing Multi-Temporal MODIS and VIIRS Nighttime Light Data Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 212
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Impervious surfaces have important effects on the natural environment, including promoting hydrological run-off and impeding evapotranspiration, as well as increasing the urban heat island effect. Obtaining accurate and timely information on the spatial distribution and dynamics of urban surfaces is, thus, of paramount importance for socio-economic analysis, urban planning, and environmental modeling and management. Previous studies have indicated that the fusion of multi-source remotely sensed imagery can increase the accuracy of prediction for impervious surface information across large areas. However, the majority of them are limited to the use of specific data sources to construct a few features with which it can be challenging to characterize adequately the variation in impervious surfaces over large areas. Thus, impervious surface maps are often presented with high uncertainty. In response to this problem, we proposed the use of multi-temporal MODIS and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) nighttime light data to construct a more general and robust feature set for large-area artificial impervious surface percentage (AISP) prediction. Three fusion methods were proposed for application to multi-temporal MODIS surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data to construct three different types of features: spectral features, index features (band calculations), and fusion features. These features were then used as variables in a random-forest-based AISP prediction model. The model was fitted to China and then applied to predict AISP across Asia. Fifteen typical cities from different regions of Asia were selected to assess the accuracy of the prediction model. The use of multi-temporal MODIS and VIIRS DNB data was found to significantly increase the accuracy of prediction for large-area AISP. The feature set constructed in this research was demonstrated to be suitable for large-area AISP prediction, and the random forest model based on optimization of the selected features achieved the highest accuracy, amongst benchmarks, with testing R2 of 0.690, and testing RMSE of 0.044 in 2018, respectively. In addition, to further test the performance of the proposed method, three existing impervious products (GAIA, HBASE, and NUACI) were used to compare quantitatively. The results showed that the predicted AISP achieved superior performance in comparison with others in some areas (e.g., arid areas and cloudy areas).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3241
Permanent link to this record