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Author Henderson, J.V.; Storeygard, A.; Weil, D.N.
Title A Bright Idea for Measuring Economic Growth Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication The American Economic Review Abbreviated Journal Am Econ Rev
Volume 101 Issue 3 Pages 194-199
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The quantity of human-generated light visible from outer space reflects variation in both population density and income per capita. In this paper we explore the usefulness of the change in visible light as a measure of GDP growth. We discuss the data, and then present a statistical framework that uses lights growth to augment existing income growth measures, assuming that measurement errors in the two series are uncorrelated. For some countries with very poor income measurement, we significantly revise estimates of growth. Our technique also produces growth estimates for cities or regions where no other data are available.
Address Brown University and NBER
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-8282 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25076786; PMCID:PMC4112959 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2767
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Author Mishra, I.; Knerr, R.M.; Stewart, A.A.; Payette, W.I.; Richter, M.M.; Ashley, N.T.
Title Light at night disrupts diel patterns of cytokine gene expression and endocrine profiles in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 15833
Keywords Animals
Abstract Increased exposure to light pollution perturbs physiological processes through misalignment of daily rhythms at the cellular and tissue levels. Effects of artificial light-at-night (ALAN) on diel properties of immunity are currently unknown. We therefore tested the effects of ALAN on diel patterns of cytokine gene expression, as well as key hormones involved with the regulation of immunity, in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Circulating melatonin and corticosterone, and mRNA expression levels of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines were measured at six time points across 24-h day in brain (nidopallium, hippocampus, and hypothalamus) and peripheral tissues (liver, spleen, and fat) of zebra finches exposed to 12 h light:12 h darkness (LD), dim light-at-night (DLAN) or constant bright light (LLbright). Melatonin and corticosterone concentrations were significantly rhythmic under LD, but not under LLbright and DLAN. Genes coding for cytokines showed tissue-specific diurnal rhythms under LD and were lost with exposure to LLbright, except IL-6 in hypothalamus and liver. In comparison to LLbright, effects of DLAN were less adverse with persistence of some diurnal rhythms, albeit with significant waveform alterations. These results underscore the circadian regulation of biosynthesis of immune effectors and imply the susceptibility of daily immune and endocrine patterns to ALAN.
Address Department of Biology, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, USA. noah.ashley@wku.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31676761; PMCID:PMC6825233 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2766
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Author Xue, X.; Lin, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, K.; Zhang, J.; Deng, J.; Abubakar, G.A.; Gan, M.
Title Mapping the fine-scale spatial pattern of artificial light pollution at night in urban environments from the perspective of bird habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 702 Issue Pages 134725
Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; ALAN pollution; Circuitscape; Land cover; Nighttime light image; Urban ecology
Abstract The increase in artificial light at night (ALAN) is a global concern, while the pattern of ALAN pollution inside urban areas has not yet been fully explored. To fill this gap, we developed a novel method to map fine-scale ALAN pollution patterns in urban bird habitats using high spatial resolution ALAN satellite data. First, an ALAN pollution map was derived from JL1-3B satellite images. Then, the core habitat nodes (CHNs) representing the main habitats for urban birds to inhabit were identified from the land cover map, which was produced using Gaofen2 (GF2) data, and the high probability corridors (HPCs), indicating high connectivity paths, were derived from Circuitscape software. Finally, the ALAN patterns in the CHNs and HPCs were analysed, and the mismatch index was proposed to evaluate the trade-off between human activity ALAN demands and ALAN supply for the protection of urban birds. The results demonstrated that 115 woodland patches covering 4149.0ha were selected as CHNs, and most of the CHNs were large urban parks or scenic spots located in the urban fringe. The 2923 modelled HPCs occupying 1179.2ha were small remaining vegetation patches and vegetated corridors along the major transport arteries. The differences in the ALAN pollution patterns between CHNs and HPCs were mainly determined by the characteristics of the green space patches and the light source types. The polluted regions in the CHNs were clustered in a few regions that suffered from concentrated and intensive ALAN, while most of the CHNs remained unaffected. In contrast, the 727 HPCs were mainly polluted by street lighting was scattered and widely distributed, resulting a more varying influence to birds than that in the CHNs. Relating patterns of the ALAN to bird habitats and connectivity provides meaningful information for comprehensive planning to alleviate the disruptive effects of ALAN pollution.
Address College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address: ganmuye@zju.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31734607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2765
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Author Smit, A.N.; Broesch, T.; Siegel, J.M.; Mistlberger, R.E.
Title Sleep timing and duration in indigenous villages with and without electric lighting on Tanna Island, Vanuatu Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 17278
Keywords Human Health
Abstract It has been hypothesized that sleep in the industrialized world is in chronic deficit, due in part to evening light exposure, which delays sleep onset and truncates sleep depending on morning work or school schedules. If so, societies without electricity may sleep longer. However, recent studies of hunter-gatherers and pastoralists living traditional lifestyles without electricity report short sleep compared to industrialized population norms. To further explore the impact of lifestyles and electrification on sleep, we measured sleep by actigraphy in indigenous Melanesians on Tanna Island, Vanuatu, who live traditional subsistence horticultural lifestyles, in villages either with or without access to electricity. Sleep duration was long and efficiency low in both groups, compared to averages from actigraphy studies of industrialized populations. In villages with electricity, light exposure after sunset was increased, sleep onset was delayed, and nocturnal sleep duration was reduced. These effects were driven primarily by breastfeeding mothers living with electric lighting. Relatively long sleep on Tanna may reflect advantages of an environment in which food access is reliable, climate benign, and predators and significant social conflict absent. Despite exposure to outdoor light throughout the day, an effect of artificial evening light was nonetheless detectable on sleep timing and duration.
Address Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A1S6, Canada. mistlber@sfu.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31754265 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2764
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Author Hu, X.; Qian, Y.; Pickett, S.T.A.; Zhou, W.
Title Urban mapping needs up-to-date approaches to provide diverse perspectives of current urbanization: A novel attempt to map urban areas with nighttime light data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume 195 Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Quantifying the spatial and temporal changes of urban extent is important for understanding the burgeoning process of urbanization. Numerous well-performing methods have been used to map urban areas and detect urban changes using nighttime light data, but many of these methods assume that the urban area is equivalent to regions with high percentages of impervious surfaces or developed land. We present an approach to efficiently map urban areas at the regional scale, which also provides opportunities to recognize urban extents from different theoretical perspectives. In our approach, appropriate demarcating criteria and urban indicators were chosen based on understanding the current state of urbanization of the study area. After object-based segmentation and detection of initial urban centers, urban patches are discerned by expanding from these initial urban centers through a grouping algorithm, delineating the relative fringes of the urban area. We tested this new approach for mainland China, using 2010 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System nighttime light data and county-level administrative units. We found a total urban area of 146,806  spread across 2489 counties and amounting to 1.5% of the land in mainland China. The delineated boundary of the urban patches had different values by compass direction. Mean values of fringes and sizes of different urban patches varied greatly across regions. We detected all provincial capitals, 97.3% of the prefecture-level cities and 91.0% of the county-level cities. This approach is thus capable of identifying urban patches with reliable accuracy at the regional scale.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2763
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