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Author Alquezar, R.D.; Macedo, R.H.; Sierro, J.; Gil, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lack of consistent responses to aircraft noise in dawn song timing of bird populations near tropical airports Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Abbreviated Journal Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 74 Issue 7 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Birds living near airports can reduce the noise interference by advancing their dawn chorus timing and avoiding the start of airport operations. Data supporting this finding come from temperate areas, but little is known from tropical environments, where seasonal variation is lower and biodiversity is higher. Here, we investigated whether 15 tropical bird species are able to advance their dawn song and avoid aircraft noise interference. We sampled dawn song in three airports and three control sites in Brazil, using automated recording units. We found that dawn song times were not globally affected by the exposure to airport noise. Instead, changes were highly variable and species-specific, as dawn song onset was significantly advanced in two and delayed in four species. This large variation in responses was surprising given patterns found in previous studies. Indeed, this is the first time that a significant delay is reported for bird’s dawn song. We explored whether between-species differences in this response could be explained by additional variables (song frequency, degree of urbanity, and noise release), but none of them explained the direction or the strength of the changes. We suggest that earlier airport activity and shorter variations in day length and in twilight duration of tropical areas may be restricting birds’ ability to change dawn song timing. Further studies should consider these differences and analyze to what extent populational declines in noisy areas and the resultant reduced competition for acoustic space may be affecting the changes in dawn chorus onset time.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3017  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Behn, C.; De Gregorio, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin Relations with Energy Metabolism as Possibly Involved in Fatal Mountain Road Traffic Accidents Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 6 Pages  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; dysrhythmia; melatonin; mountain road death  
  Abstract Previous results evidenced acute exposure to high altitude (HA) weakening the relation between daily melatonin cycle and the respiratory quotient. This review deals with the threat extreme environments pose on body time order, particularly concerning energy metabolism. Working at HA, at poles, or in space challenge our ancestral inborn body timing system. This conflict may also mark many aspects of our current lifestyle, involving shift work, rapid time zone crossing, and even prolonged office work in closed buildings. Misalignments between external and internal rhythms, in the short term, traduce into risk of mental and physical performance shortfalls, mood changes, quarrels, drug and alcohol abuse, failure to accomplish with the mission and, finally, high rates of fatal accidents. Relations of melatonin with energy metabolism being altered under a condition of hypoxia focused our attention on interactions of the indoleamine with redox state, as well as, with autonomic regulations. Individual tolerance/susceptibility to such interactions may hint at adequately dealing with body timing disorders under extreme conditions.  
  Address Laboratory of Extreme Environments, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago 8380453, Chile  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32235717; PMCID:PMC7139848 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3016  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author LeGates, T.A.; Kvarta, M.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Illuminating a path from light to depression Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals; Human Health  
  Abstract Our light environment can strongly influence our mental health. Kai An and colleagues dissect the neuronal circuit mediating depression-related behaviors induced by mistimed light input in mice, implicating the nucleus accumbens as the downstream target of the neural pathway between intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells and the perihabenular nucleus.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1097-6256 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32555525 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3015  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, X.; Levin, N.; Xie, J.; Li, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring hourly night-time light by an unmanned aerial vehicle and its implications to satellite remote sensing Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 247 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Skyglow; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Satellite-observed night-time light in urban areas has been widely used as an indicator for socioeconomic development and light pollution. Up to present, the diurnal dynamics of city light during the night, which are important to understand the nature of human activity and the underlying variables explaining night-time brightness, have hardly been investigated by remote sensing techniques due to limitation of the revisit time and spatial resolution of available satellites. In this study, we employed a consumer-grade unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to monitor city light in a study area located in Wuhan City, China, from 8:08 PM, April 15, 2019 to 5:08 AM, April 16, 2019, with an hourly temporal resolution. By using three ground-based Sky Quality Meters (SQMs), we found that the UAV-recorded light brightness was consistent with the ground luminous intensity measured by the SQMs in both the spatial (R2 = 0.72) and temporal dimensions (R2 > 0.94), and that the average city light brightness was consistent with the sky brightness in the temporal dimension (R2 = 0.98), indicating that UAV images can reliably monitor the city's night-time brightness. The temporal analysis showed that different locations had different patterns of temporal changes in their night-time brightness, implying that inter-calibration of two kinds of satellite images with different overpass times would be a challenge. Combining an urban function map of 18 classes and the hourly UAV images, we found that urban functions differed in their temporal light dynamics. For example, the outdoor sports field lost 97.28% of its measured brightness between 8: 08 PM – 4:05 AM, while an administrative building only lost 4.56%, and the entire study area lost 61.86% of its total brightness. Within our study area, the period between 9:06 PM and 10:05 PM was the period with largest amount of light loss. The spectral analysis we conducted showed that city light colors were different in some urban functions, with the major road being the reddest region at 8:08 PM and becoming even redder at 4:05 AM. This preliminary study indicates that UAVs are a good tool to investigate city light at night, and that city light is very complex in both of the temporal and spatial dimensions, requiring comprehensive investigation using more advanced UAV techniques, and emphasizing the need for geostationary platforms for night-time light sensors.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3014  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hart, E.E.; Fennessy, J.; Hauenstein, S.; Ciuti, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Intensity of giraffe locomotor activity is shaped by solar and lunar zeitgebers Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Behavioural Processes Abbreviated Journal Behav Processes  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Moonlight; Animals  
  Abstract Natural cycles of light and darkness shift the balance of risks and gains for animals across space and time. Entrainment to photic cycles allows animals to spatiotemporally adapt their behavioural and physiological processes in line with interplaying ecological factors, such as temperature, foraging efficiency and predation risk. Until recently, our understanding of these chronobiological processes was limited by the difficulties of 24 hr observations. Technological advances in GPS biotelemetry however are now allowing us unprecedented access to long-term, fine-scale activity data. Here we use data derived from frontline technology to present the first large-scale investigation into the effects of natural fluctuations of light and darkness on the locomotor activity patterns of a threatened African mega-herbivore, the giraffe (Giraffa spp.). Using data from a remote population of Angolan giraffe (G. g. angolensis) in the northern Namib Desert, Namibia, we reveal the first full picture of giraffe chronobiology in a landscape of fear. Furthermore, we present clear evidence of the effect of moonlight on the nocturnal activity patterns of large ungulates. Our results are in line with recent research demonstrating that, rather than a fixed internal representation of time (circadian clock), many surface-dwelling ungulates have plastic activity patterns that are vulnerable to modification by external factors including light and temperature. Relatedly, we highlight important conservation management implications of rising temperatures and increasing light pollution on the chronobiology of surface-dwelling mammals.  
  Address Laboratory of Wildlife Ecology and Behaviour, School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0376-6357 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32562740 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3013  
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