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Author Jechow, A.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How dark is a river? Artificial light at night in aquatic systems and the need for comprehensive night‐time light measurements Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Water Abbreviated Journal WIREs Water  
  Volume 6 Issue 6 Pages e1388  
  Keywords Ecology; Skyglow; Review  
  Abstract Freshwater ecosystems are hotspots of biodiversity. They are of major importance for humans because they provide vital ecosystem services. However, as humans tend to settle near freshwaters and coastal areas, these ecosystems are also over‐proportionally affected by anthropogenic stressors. Artificial light at night can occur as a form of environmental pollution, light pollution. Light pollution affects large areas on a worldwide scale, is growing exponentially in radiance and extent and can have diverse negative effects on flora, fauna and on human health. While the majority of ecological studies on artificial light at night covered terrestrial systems, the studies on aquatic light pollution have unraveled impact on aquatic organisms, ecosystem functions as well as land‐water‐interactions. Although monitoring of light pollution is routinely performed from space and supported by ground‐based measurements, the extent and the amount of artificial light at night affecting water bodies is still largely unknown. This information, however, is essential for the design of future laboratory and field experiments, to guide light planners and to give recommendations for light pollution regulations. We analyze this knowledge gap by reviewing night‐time light measurement techniques and discuss their current obstacles in the context of water bodies. We also provide an overview of light pollution studies in the aquatic context. Finally, we give recommendations on how comprehensive night‐time light measurements in aquatic systems, specifically in freshwater systems, should be designed in the future.  
  Address Ecohydrology, Leibniz‐Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany; andreas.jechow(at)gmx.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2049-1948 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2688  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ranzoni, J.; Giuliani, G.; Huber, L.; Ray, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modelling the nocturnal ecological continuum of the State of Geneva, Switzerland, based on high-resolution nighttime imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment  
  Volume 16 Issue Pages 100268  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Switzerland; Europe; orthophotography; viewshed analysis  
  Abstract The increase of artificial light in recent decades has led to a general awareness of the harmful consequences of light pollution on biodiversity. The artificial light is however rarely taken into account in the principles of developing ecological networks. There is currently no standardized method for integrating this darkness factor into ecological network modeling. We propose a methodology for the identification of the nocturnal continuum through an approach based on the automated extraction of light sources from nocturnal orthophotography and the modeling of their visibility within a territory. The model is applied to the transboundary region of the Geneva basin in Switzerland and allows for the integration of the darkness factor into the existing ecological networks. Although the analysis does not consider metric lighting data, a viewshed analysis allows for a first large-scale mapping of the nighttime continuum and highlights the areas benefiting from very low light pollution.  
  Address University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Route de Presinge 150, 1254, Jussy, Switzerland; jessica.ranzoni(at)hesge.ch  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2352-9385 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2687  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Marchant, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do brighter, whiter street lights improve road safety? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Significance Abbreviated Journal Significance  
  Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages 8-9  
  Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Statistics  
  Abstract Would a billion‐dollar investment in improved street lighting make Australian roads safer at night? Paul Marchant finds the evidence wanting  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1740-9705 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2686  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Black-body luminance and magnitudes per square arcsecond in the Johnson-Cousins BVR photometric bands Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Photonics Letters of Poland Abbreviated Journal Photon. Lett. Pl.  
  Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 63  
  Keywords Skyglow; night sky brightness; luminance; photometric  
  Abstract A relevant amount of light pollution studies deal with the unwanted visual effects of artificial light at night, including the anthropogenic luminance of the sky that hinders the observation of the celestial bodies which are a main target of ground-based astrophysical research, and a key asset of the intangible heritage of humankind. Most quantitative measurements and numerical models, however, evaluate the anthropogenic sky radiance in any of the standard Johnson-Cousins UBVRI photometric bands, generally in the V one. Since the Johnson-Cousins V band is not identical with the visual CIE V-lambda used to assess luminance, the conversion between these two photometric systems turns out to be spectrum-dependent. Given its interest for practical applications, in this Letter we provide the framework to perform this conversion and the transformation constants for black-body spectra of different absolute temperatures.  
  Address Dept. Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Photonics Society of Poland Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2080-2242 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2685  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mitchell, D.; Gallaway, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dark sky tourism: economic impacts on the Colorado Plateau Economy, USA Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Tourism Review Abbreviated Journal Tour. Rev.  
  Volume 74 Issue 4 Pages 930-942  
  Keywords Society; tourism; Colorado Plateau; United States; astrotourism  
  Abstract This paper aims to examine the economic impact from dark-sky tourism in national parks in the USA on the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado Plateau is a region encompassing parts of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah that is known for its dark, star-filled night skies. Tourists in national parks are increasingly interested in observing this natural recreational amenity – especially considering that it is an ecological amenity that is quickly disappearing from the planet. Using a 10-year forecast of visitors to the national parks and using standard input-output modeling, it is observed that, for the first time anywhere, the value of dark skies to tourism in this area. The authors find that non-local tourists who value dark skies will spend $5.8bn over the next 10 years in the Colorado Plateau. These tourist expenditures will generate $2.4bn in higher wages and create over 10,000 additional jobs each year for the region. Furthermore, as dark skies are even more intense natural amenity in the non-summer months, they have the ability to increase visitor counts to national parks year-round and lead to a more efficient use of local community and tourism-related resources throughout the year.  
  Address Department of Economics, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri, USA;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Emerald Group Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1660-5373 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 2684  
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