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Author Garstang, R. H. url  openurl
  Title Improved scattering formula for calculations of artificial night-sky illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 1984 Publication The Observatory Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 104 Issue Pages 196-197  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract In recent years there has been increased interest in measuring the artificial illumination produced in the night sky cities of various sizes at a range of distances from the observer. Examples of such measurements include the work of Treanor on three Italian cities, that of Walker on the cities of various sized in California, and a study by Berry of light pollution in Southern Ontario. There seem to have been few attempts to provide theoretical interpretations of these measurements other than that contained in the paper by Treanor. He developed a simple empirical formula (his equation (6)) for the zenith brigthness due to a distant city as a function of the distance of the observer from the city. Treanor's formula was used by Berry, with a modification which we mention later.

Treanor based his formula on a very ingenious method of estimating the contribution to the zenith brightness of aerosol scattering between the city, treated as a point source, and an element of the atmosphere in the direction of the observer's zenith. Readers are referred to Treanor's paper for details of his derivation. We give here a simple extension of his work which leads to a scattering formula valid under less restrictive assumptions.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2638  
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Author Bauhr, M. & Carlitz, R. url  openurl
  Title TRANSPARENCY AND THE QUALITY OF LOCAL PUBLIC SERVICE PROVISION Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication QOG THE QUALITY OF GOVERNMENT INSTITUTE Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Transparency has been widely promoted as a tool for improving public service

delivery; however, empirical evidence is inconclusive. We suggest that the effects of transparency on service provision are contingent on the nature of the service. Specifically, transparency is more likely to improve the quality of service provision when street-level discretion is high, since discretion increases information asymmetries, and, in the absence of transparency, allows officials to target public services in suboptimal ways. Using finely grained data from the Vietnam Provincial Governance and Public Administration Performance Index between 2011–2017, we show that communes that experience increases in transparency also experience improved quality of education and health (services characterized by greater discretion), while the quality of infrastructure

provision (characterized by less discretion) bears no relation to increased transparency. The findings help us understand when transparency can improve service provision, as well the effects of transparency reforms in non-democratic settings.
 
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2637  
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Author Haddock, J., K., Threlfall, C. G., Law, B., & Hochuli, D. F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Responses of insectivorous bats and nocturnal insects to local changes in street light technology Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Austral Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night is a pervasive anthropogenic stressor for biodiversity. Many fast‐flying insectivorous bat species feed on insects that are attracted to light‐emitting ultraviolet radiation (10–400 nm). Several countries are currently focused on replacing mercury vapour lamps, which emit ultraviolet light, with more cost‐efficient light‐emitting diode (LED) lights, which emit less ultraviolet radiation. This reduction in ultraviolet light may cause declines in insect densities in cities, predatory fast‐flying bats, and some edge‐foraging and slow‐flying bats. Capitalising on a scheme to update streetlights from high ultraviolet mercury vapour to low ultraviolet LED in Sydney, Australia, we measured the activity of individual bat species, the activity of different functional groups and the bat and insect communities, before and after the change in technology. We also surveyed sites with already LED lights, sites with mercury vapour lights and unlit bushland remnants. Species adapted to foraging in cluttered vegetation, and some edge‐space foraging species, were more active in unlit bushland sites than in all lit sites and decreased in activity at lit sites after the change to LED lights. The change to LED streetlights caused a decrease in the fast‐flying Chalinolobus gouldii but not Miniopterus schreibersii oceanensis, the latter being more influenced by seasonal and environmental variables. Insect biomass was not affected by changing light types, but instead was negatively correlated with the moon's percentage illuminance. Changing streetlights to LEDs could result in a decline in some insectivorous bats in cities. This study confirms that unlit urban bushland remnants are important refuges for high bat diversity, particularly for more clutter‐adapted species and some edge‐space foraging species. Preventing light penetration into unlit bushland patches and corridors remains essential to protect the urban bat community.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2636  
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Author Choi, S. J., Park, H. R. & Joo, E. Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Light on Daytime Sleep in 12 Hours Night Shift Workers: A Field Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Korean Sleep Research Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 26-35  
  Keywords Human Health; Sleep  
  Abstract Objectives: Night shift workers suffer from sleep and daytime disturbances due to circadian misalignment. To investigate the role of environmental light in daytime sleep following 12 h-night shift work. Methods: we enrolled 12 h-shift female nurses working at one university-affiliated hospital (n=10, mean age 26.6 years, shift work duration 3.8 years). This is a cross-over study to compare sleep between under light exposure (30 lux) and in the dark (<5 lux) following 12 h-night duty. Two sessions of experiments were underwent and the interval between sessions was about a month. Psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) had performed on awakening from sleep at each session and sleep-wake pattern had been monitored by actigraphy throughout the study period. Daytime sleep was also compared with night sleep of age-and gender matched daytime workers (n=10). Results: Sleep parameters and PVT scores were not different between two light conditions. Activities during sleep seemed to be more abundant under 30 lux condition than in the dark, which was not significant. Compared to night sleep, daytime sleep of shift workers was different in terms of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Three shift workers showed sleep onset REM sleep and first REM sleep period was the longest during daytime sleep. Conclusions: Unexpectedly, daytime sleep of 12 h night shift workers was well-maintained regardless of light exposure. Early occurrence of REM sleep and shorter sleep latency during daytime sleep suggest that shift workers meet with misalignment of circadian rhythm as well as increased homeostatic sleep pressure drive.  
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  Language Korean Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2635  
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Author Schroer, S., Häffner, E., & Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of artificial illumination on the development of a leafmining moth in urban trees Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 21 Issue 1 Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light emission from street lighting or other light sources alters the living conditions for organisms in urban areas. Nowadays, the impact of light at night (ALAN) on urban plants and their trophic environment is not well understood. To gain more insight about herbivore plant’s interaction when exposed to ALAN, outdoor and greenhouse tests were conducted using the horse-chestnut leafminer, Cameraria ohridella, as a test organism due to its adaptive behavior. At the end of the season, the development of chestnut tree leaves and the leafminer were measured at illuminated versus non-illuminated sites in the city of Berlin and the rural area of Brandenburg. Illuminated leaves were larger than those grown in darker rural areas and, extended larval activity was recorded. Additionally, in the greenhouse, infested chestnut seedlings were exposed to two different light regimes; one treatment provided continuous illumination and the other short daylight conditions. After only one week, the mine size was lower on illuminated seedlings, presumably due to reduced leaf senescence. The leafminer developed a lower proportion of diapausing pupae and a higher proportion of free pupae, which leads to a further generation within the season. The results indicate a strong impact of ALAN on plant metabolism, a secondary effect on leafminer development and its larval activity. For urban trees, the consequence might be an increased herbivore / parasite pressure. For herbivores and parasites less adapted to winter damages than the invasive leafminer a reduced dormancy due to direct or indirect effects of ALAN could even threat the population.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2634  
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