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Author Sun, S.; Cao, W.; Ge, Y.; Ran, J.; Sun, F.; Zeng, Q.; Guo, M.; Huang, J.; Lee, R.S.-Y.; Tian, L.; Wellenius, G.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Outdoor light at night and risk of coronary heart disease among older adults: a prospective cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication European Heart Journal Abbreviated Journal Eur Heart J  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human health; Cohort study; Coronary heart disease; Hospitalization; Light at night; Mortality  
  Abstract AIMS: We estimated the association between outdoor light at night at the residence and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) within a prospective cohort of older adults in Hong Kong. METHODS AND RESULTS: Over a median of 11 years of follow-up, we identified 3772 incident CHD hospitalizations and 1695 CHD deaths. Annual levels of outdoor light at night at participants' residential addresses were estimated using time-varying satellite data for a composite of persistent night-time illumination at approximately 1 km2 scale. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the association between outdoor light at night at the residence and risk of CHD. The association between light at night and incident CHD hospitalization and mortality exhibited a monotonic exposure-response function. An interquartile range (IQR) (60.0 nW/cm2/sr) increase in outdoor light at night was associated with an HR of 1.11 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.18) for CHD hospitalizations and 1.10 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.22) for CHD deaths after adjusting for both individual and area-level risk factors. The association did not vary across strata of hypothesized risk factors. CONCLUSION: Among older adults, outdoor light at night at the residence was associated with a higher risk of CHD hospitalizations and deaths. We caution against causal interpretation of these novel findings. Future studies with more detailed information on exposure, individual adaptive behaviours, and potential mediators are warranted to further examine the relationship between light at night and CHD risk.  
  Address Department of Environmental Health, Boston University School of Public Health, 715 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118, USA; linweit ( at ) hku.hk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Oxford Academic Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0195-668X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33205210 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3396  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Okuliarova, M.; Rumanova, V.S.; Stebelova, K.; Zeman, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim Light at Night Disturbs Molecular Pathways of Lipid Metabolism Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci  
  Volume 21 Issue 18 Pages  
  Keywords Human health; chronodisruption; circadian clocks; fatty acids; glucose; insulin; leptin; lipogenesis; liver; nuclear receptors; steatosis  
  Abstract Dim light at night (dLAN) is associated with metabolic risk but the specific effects on lipid metabolism have only been evaluated to a limited extent. Therefore, to explore whether dLAN can compromise lipid metabolic homeostasis in healthy individuals, we exposed Wistar rats to dLAN (~2 lx) for 2 and 5 weeks and analyzed the main lipogenic pathways in the liver and epididymal fat pad, including the control mechanisms at the hormonal and molecular level. We found that dLAN promoted hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation, upregulated hepatic genes involved in de novo synthesis of fatty acids, and elevated glucose and fatty acid uptake. These observations were paralleled with suppressed fatty acid synthesis in the adipose tissue and altered plasma adipokine levels, indicating disturbed adipocyte metabolic function with a potential negative impact on liver metabolism. Moreover, dLAN-exposed rats displayed an elevated expression of two peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family members (Pparalpha and Ppargamma) in the liver and adipose tissue, suggesting the deregulation of important metabolic transcription factors. Together, our results demonstrate that an impaired balance of lipid biosynthetic pathways caused by dLAN can increase lipid storage in the liver, thereby accounting for a potential linking mechanism between dLAN and metabolic diseases.  
  Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Ilkovicova 6, 842 15 Bratislava, Slovakia; monika.okuliarova ( at ) uniba.sk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32967195; PMCID:PMC7555372 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3395  
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Author Longcore, T.; Duriscoe, D.; Aubé, M.; Jechow, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Pendoley, K.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Commentary: Brightness of the Night Sky Affects Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) Sea Turtle Hatchling Misorientation but Not Nest Site Selection Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; light pollution; sea turtles; light measurement; photometry; glare; sky quality meter  
  Abstract A Commentary on “Brightness of the Night Sky Affects Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) Sea Turtle Hatchling Misorientation but Not Nest Site Selection” by Stanley, T. R., White, J. M., Teel, S., and Nicholas, M. (2020). Front. Mar. Sci. 7:221. doi: 10.3389/fmars.2020.00221  
  Address UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, Los Angeles, CA, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Frontiers Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3394  
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Author Camejo, D.; Frutos, A.; Mestre, T.C.; del Carmen Piñero, M.; Rivero, R.M.; Martínez, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light impacts the physical and nutritional quality of lettuce plants Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Hortic. Environ. Biotechnol.  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 69-82  
  Keywords Plants; Antioxidants; Bioactive compounds; Enzymes; Growth; lettuce; Lactuca sativa  
  Abstract Leafy vegetables, including lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), are considered to be healthy due to their high content of fiber, folate, carotenoids, phenolic and antioxidant compounds, minerals, and vitamins A, C, and K. Recently, LEDs are being used extensively as a supplementary light source in indoor agriculture due to the economical and physiological advantages that this artificial illumination offers compared to traditional fluorescence illumination. In this work, two commercially important lettuce varieties, Batavia Lettony (green leaves) and Batavia Diablotin (red leaves), were used to study the impact of LEDs (white and red–blue lights) and fluorescent illumination on their quality and health properties. Changes in the photosynthetic photon flux density from 250 to 400 µmol m−2 s−1 of fluorescent light increased growth parameters (leaf number, fresh and dry weight, and percentage of dry matter) of B. Lettony plants. We observed a positive impact of red–blue LED illumination on growth parameters analyzed in B. Diablotin plants compared to plants grown under fluorescent light at 250 µmol m−2 s−1. Leaf texture significantly increased in B. Lettony plants grown under 400 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent and LED illumination compared to that of plants grown under 250 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. This variable was only increased under red–blue LED illumination in B. Diablotin plants. Accumulation of bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins and vitamin C, was higher in B. Diablotin plants grown under 250 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. Nutrient content in the foliar part was not modified under the light conditions used, except the Ca2+ content of B. Lettony plants grown under PPFD 400 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. Catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) activities were differentially modified by light conditions in B. Lettony plants. However, POX activity was only modified in response to light conditions in B. Diablotin plants. Thus, this study demonstrates that LEDs could be used as an alternative to produce food under sustainable conditions. In this sense, although several horticultural studies have been conducted to establish the effectiveness of LEDs in lettuce growth, additional investigations are necessary to determine the optimal conditions for the use of LEDs to promote lettuce production and the accumulation of beneficial components, such as vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidant compounds.  
  Address Department of Plant Nutrition, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, P.O. Box 164, 30100, Espinardo, Murcia, Spain;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-3452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3393  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Malik, I.; Batra, T.; Das, S.; Kumar, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night affects gut microbial community and negatively impacts host physiology in diurnal animals: Evidence from captive zebra finches Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Microbiological Research Abbreviated Journal Microbiol Res  
  Volume 241 Issue Pages 126597  
  Keywords Animals; Bacteria; Constant light; Lactobacillus; Microbiome; Zebra finch; dLAN  
  Abstract The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) hosts a large number of diverse microorganisms, with mutualistic interactions with the host. Here, in two separate experiments, we investigated whether light at night (LAN) would affect GIT microbiota and, in turn, the host physiology in diurnal zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Experiment I assessed the effects of no-night (LL) and dimly illuminated night (dim light at night, dLAN) on fecal microbiota diversity and host physiology of birds born and raised under 12 h photoperiod (LD; 12 h light: 12 h darkness). Under LL and dLAN, compared to LD, we found a significant increase in the body mass, subcutaneous fat deposition and hepatic accumulation of lipids. Although we found no difference in total 24 h food consumption, LL/ dLAN birds ate also at night, suggesting LAN-induced alteration in daily feeding times. Concurrently, there were marked differences in amplicon sequence and bacterial species richness between LD and LAN, with notable decline in Lactobacillus richness in birds under LL and dLAN. We attributed declined Lactobacillus population as causal (at least partially) to negative effects on the host metabolism. Therefore, in experiment II with similar protocol, birds under LL and dLAN were fed on diet with or without Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplement. Clearly, LGG supplement ameliorated LL- and dLAN-induced negative effects in zebra finches. These results demonstrate adverse effects of unnatural lighting on GIT bacterial diversity and host physiology, and suggest the role of GIT microbiota in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in response to LAN environment in diurnal animals.  
  Address Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi, 110 007, India; vkumar ( at ) zoology.du.ac.in  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0944-5013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32979783 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial (down) 3392  
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