toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Chen, M.; Cai, H.; Yang, X.; Jin, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A novel classification regression method for gridded electric power consumption estimation in China Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 18558  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Spatially explicit information on electric power consumption (EPC) is crucial for effective electricity allocation and utilization. Many studies have estimated fine-scale spatial EPC based on remotely sensed nighttime light (NTL). However, the spatial non-stationary relationship between EPC and NTL at prefectural level tends to be overlooked in existing literature. In this study, a classification regression method to estimate the gridded EPC in China based on imaging NTL via a Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) was described. In addition, owing to some inherent omissions in the VIIRS NTL data, the study has employed the cubic Hermite interpolation to produce a more appropriate NTL dataset for estimation. The proposed method was compared with ordinary least squares (OLS) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) approaches. The results showed that our proposed method outperformed OLS and GWR in relative error (RE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). The desirable results benefited mainly from a reasonable classification scheme that fully considered the spatial non-stationary relationship between EPC and NTL. Thus, the analysis suggested that the proposed classification regression method would enhance the accuracy of the gridded EPC estimation and provide a valuable reference predictive model for electricity consumption.  
  Address College of Urban and Environment, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33122690; PMCID:PMC7596565 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3193  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, J.; Ghastine, L.; Um, P.; Rovit, E.; Wu, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Environmental Exposures and Sleep Outcomes: a review of evidence, potential mechanisms, and implications Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Environmental Research  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Environmental exposures and poor sleep outcomes are known to have consequential effects on human health. This integrative review first seeks to present and synthesize existing literature investigating the relationship between exposure to various environmental factors and sleep health. We then present potential mechanisms of action as well as implications for policy and future research for each environmental exposure. Broadly, although studies are still emerging, empirical evidence has begun to show a positive association between adverse effects of heavy metal, noise pollution, light pollution, second-hand smoke, and air pollution exposures and various sleep problems. Specifically, these negative sleep outcomes range from subjective sleep manifestations, such as general sleep quality, sleep duration, daytime dysfunction, and daytime sleepiness, as well as objective sleep measures, including difficulties with sleep onset and maintenance, sleep stage or circadian rhythm interference, sleep arousal, REM activity, and sleep disordered breathing. However, the association between light exposure and sleep is less clear. Potential toxicological mechanisms are thought to include the direct effect of various environmental toxicants on the nervous, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Nevertheless, future research is required to tease out the exact pathways of action to explain the associations between each environmental factor and sleep, to inform possible therapies to negate the detrimental effects, and to increase efforts in decreasing exposure to these harmful environmental factors to improve health.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0013-9351 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3192  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Esaki, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N.; Kitajima, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of evening light exposure on sleep in bipolar disorder: A longitudinal analysis for repeated measures in the APPLE cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Aust N Z J Psychiatry  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Bipolar disorder; actigraphy; circadian rhythm; evening light; sleep  
  Abstract OBJECTIVE: Sleep disturbance, a core feature of bipolar disorder, is associated with residual mood symptoms, mood episode recurrence and suicide ideation. We investigated the effect of evening light exposure on sleep in patients with bipolar disorder. METHODS: In this longitudinal analysis, we measured the sleep parameters of 207 outpatients with bipolar disorder using actigraphy at their homes for seven consecutive nights. We measured the white-light illuminance and the irradiance of each wavelength during the 4 hours before each participant's bedtime. We used mixed-effect linear regression analysis for repeated measures to evaluate the effect of evening light exposure on subsequent sleep parameters. RESULTS: The median white-light illuminance was 25.8 lux (interquartile range, 12.9-50.1 lux). In a multivariable model adjusted for potential confounders, we found higher white-light illuminance to be significantly associated with lower sleep efficiency (per log lux: 95% confidence interval = [-1.328, -0.133]; p = 0.017), prolonged sleep-onset latency (95% confidence interval = [0.006, 0.172]; p = 0.035) and longer wake after sleep onset (95% confidence interval = [1.104, 4.459]; p = 0.001). This effect size was larger in the younger age group (aged < 44 years) stratified by median age. Higher irradiance of the blue wavelength range was significantly associated with longer wake after sleep onset, a result similar to those for the green and red wavelength ranges. CONCLUSION: We observed significant associations between evening light exposure and subsequent sleep in patients with bipolar disorder. The effects of various light wavelengths on sleep in bipolar disorder require further investigation.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-8674 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33118369 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3191  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adeniyi, M.J.; Agoreyo, F.O.; Olorunnisola, O.L.; Olaniyan, O.T.; Seriki, S.A.; Ozolua, P.O.; Odetola, A.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Photo-pollution disrupts reproductive homeostasis in female rats: The duration-dependent role of selenium administrations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication The Chinese Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal Chin J Physiol  
  Volume 63 Issue 5 Pages 235-243  
  Keywords Animals; Estrous cycle ratio; follicle-stimulating hormone; luteinizing hormone; photo-pollution; reproductive homeostasis; selenium  
  Abstract Although selenium is known to be essential for reproductive function, studies have indicated the adverse effect with its prolonged use. The present study investigated the duration-related effect of selenium administrations on reproductive hormones and estrous cycle indices in adult female Wistar rats exposed to a model of light pollution using altered photoperiod (AP). Ninety-six cyclic female Wistar rats displaying 4-5 days' estrous cycle length (ECL) and weighing 148-152 g were randomly divided into short and long experimental cohorts consisting of six groups each and spanning for 1 and 8 weeks, respectively. Each consisted of control, high selenium dose (HSE), low selenium dose (LSE), AP, AP + HSE, and AP + LSE. The rats were orally administered high dose (150 mug/kg) and low dose (100 mug/kg) of sodium selenite once per day. The estrous cycle indices were monitored. Plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E), progesterone (P), prolactin, E/P ratio, and histology of ovary and uterine horn were evaluated. The statistical analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. In AP rats, HSE and LSE caused no significant effect on LH, E, P, and E/P ratio, ECL, estrus interval (EI), and estrous cycle ratio (ECR). The effect of HSE and LSE on LH, E, P, E/P ratio, and ECL showed no duration-dependent increase, but there was a duration-dependent increase in EI and ECR at low dose. The study indicated that administration of HSE of selenium improved reproductive function in photo-pollution-exposed rats irrespective of the duration of treatment.  
  Address Department of Anatomy, Edo University Iyamho, Edo State, Nigeria  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4920 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33109790 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3190  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Boom, M.P.; Spoelstra, K.; Biere, A.; Knop, E.; Visser, M.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Pollination and fruit infestation under artificial light at night:light colour matters Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 18389  
  Keywords Plants; Ecology  
  Abstract Rapid human population growth and associated urbanization lead to increased artificial illumination of the environment. By changing the natural light-dark cycle, artificial lighting can affect the functioning of natural ecosystems. Many plants rely on insects in order to reproduce but these insects are known to be disturbed by artificial light. Therefore, plant-insect interactions may be affected when exposed to artificial illumination. These effects can potentially be reduced by using different light spectra than white light. We studied the effect of artificial lighting on plant-insect interactions in the Silene latifolia-Hadena bicruris system using a field set-up with four different light treatments: red, green, white and a dark control. We compared the proportion of fertilized flowers and fertilized ovules as well as the infestation of fruits by Hadena bicruris, a pollinating seed predator. We found no difference in the proportion of fertilized flowers among the treatments. The proportion of fruits infested by H. bicruris was however significantly higher under green and white light and a significantly lower proportion of fertilized ovules was found under green light. We show that artificial light with different colours impacts plant-insect interactions differently, with direct consequences for plant fitness.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), P.O. Box 50, 6700 AB, Wageningen, The Netherlands. m.visser@nioo.knaw.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33110135; PMCID:PMC7591485 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3189  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: