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Author Liu, M.; Zhang, Q.; Gao, S.; Huang, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The spatial aggregation of rural e-commerce in China: An empirical investigation into Taobao Villages Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Rural Studies Abbreviated Journal Journal of Rural Studies  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract China's rural e-commerce has been developing quickly over the last decade, and it has shown significant spatial aggregation in some areas. This paper examines this development and investigates factors that impact its spatial aggregation. The development of Taobao Villages is a typical example that reflects the fast development and spatial aggregation of rural e-commerce in villages. Thus, all the Taobao Villages that existed in China by 2017 are used as our research sample for the empirical analysis. Considering that village-level data involving long-term and large-scale observations are lacking in China, we innovatively combine report data from Alibaba, spatial data from Geography Information Systems technology, company data from web crawler technology and nighttime light data from remote sensing technology to quantify the factors of interest for each sample village. Ultimately, the consistent results of a random-effects probit model based on data about 2266 villages across six years and a negative binominal model based on cross-section data of 2092 villages demonstrates that the spatial aggregation at village-level with regard to rural e-commerce is significantly driven by the local industrial base and neighborhood effects. Interestingly, the socioeconomic conditions of the surrounding regions that villages locate in impact the spatial aggregation of rural e-commerce significantly and it presents non-linear relationship between them, but the local socioeconomic conditions of villages per se do not present significant impacts on it. This paper concludes with the policy implication for the promotion of spatial aggregation of rural e-commerce.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0743-0167 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3183  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Franklin, M.; Yin, X.; McConnell, R.; Fruin, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association of the Built Environment With Childhood Psychosocial Stress Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication JAMA Network Open Abbreviated Journal JAMA Netw Open  
  Volume 3 Issue 10 Pages e2017634  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Importance: Emerging research suggests that factors associated with the built environment, including artificial light, air pollution, and noise, may adversely affect children's mental health, while living near green space may reduce stress. Little is known about the combined roles of these factors on children's stress. Objective: To investigate associations between components of the built environment with personal and home characteristics in a large cohort of children who were assessed for perceived stress. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this cohort study, a total of 2290 Southern California Children's Health Study participants residing in 8 densely populated urban communities responded to detailed questionnaires. Exposures of artificial light at night (ALAN) derived from satellite observations, near-roadway air pollution (NRP) determined from a dispersion model, noise estimated from the US Traffic Noise Model, and green space from satellite observations of the enhanced vegetation index were linked to each participant's geocoded residence. Main Outcomes and Measures: Children's stress was assessed at ages 13 to 14 years and 15 to 16 years using the 4-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-4), scaled from 0 to 16, with higher scores indicating greater perceived stress. Measurements were conducted in 2010 and 2012, and data were analyzed from February 6 to August 24, 2019. Multivariate mixed-effects models were used to examine multiple exposures; modification and mediation analyses were also conducted. Results: Among the 2290 children in this study, 1149 were girls (50%); mean (SD) age was 13.5 (0.6) years. Girls had significantly higher perceived stress measured by PSS-4 (mean [SD] score, 5.7 [3.4]) than boys (4.9 [3.2]). With increasing age (from 13.5 [0.6] to 15.3 [0.6] years), the mean PSS-4 score rose from 5.6 (3.3) to 6.0 (3.4) in girls but decreased for boys from 5.0 (3.2) to 4.7 (3.1). Multivariate mixed-effects models examining multiple exposures indicated that exposure to secondhand smoke in the home was associated with a 0.85 (95% CI, 0.46-1.24) increase in the PSS-4 score. Of the factors related to the physical environment, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in ALAN was associated with a 0.57 (95% CI, 0.05-1.09) unit increase in the PSS-4 score together with a 0.16 score increase per IQR increase of near-roadway air pollution (95% CI, 0.02-0.30) and a -0.24 score decrease per IQR increase of the enhanced vegetation index (95% CI, -0.45 to -0.04). Income modified the ALAN effect size estimate; participants in households earning less than $48000 per year had significantly greater stress per IQR increase in ALAN. Sleep duration partially mediated the associations between stress and both enhanced vegetation index (17%) and ALAN (18%). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, children's exposure to smoke at home in addition to residential exposure to ALAN and near-roadway air pollution were associated with increased perceived stress among young adolescent children. These associations appeared to be partially mitigated by more residential green space. The findings may support the promotion of increased residential green spaces to reduce pollution associated with the built environment, with possible mental health benefits for children.  
  Address Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2574-3805 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33084897 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3182  
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Kómar, L.; Lamphar, H.; Wallner, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Are population-based models advantageous in estimating the lumen outputs from light-pollution sources? Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 496 Issue 1 Pages L138-L141  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The total lumen output (TLO) from ground-based artificial light sources is required in a wide range of light-pollution models currently in use. No realistic assessment of diffuse light levels in the nocturnal environment is possible if the information on TLO is missing. Traditional approaches to skyglow modelling, if no lighting inventory is available, foresee to estimate TLO based on population and average amount of lumens per capita. However, we show in this letter that a model based on the area of artificially lit surfaces can reduce uncertainties in estimating TLO by 25 per cent for compact urban areas of defined centres and autonomous character and even 50 per cent for diffuse cities with small satellite towns interacting closely with the main city. The new model could be of great significance to the community of light-pollution researchers, especially astronomers, physicists, and modellers who use TLO routinely in light-pollution characterization.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1745-3925 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3181  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shan, J.; Liu, Y.; Kong, X.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Identifying City Shrinkage in Population and City Activity in the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River, China Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Urban Planning and Development Abbreviated Journal J. Urban Plann. Dev.  
  Volume 146 Issue 3 Pages 04020027-1 - 04020027-11  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In the context of globalization, cities have undergone a polarization of growth and shrinkage. Urban shrinkage is typically measured by a decrease in population. However, city activity is usually ignored. Accordingly, this study measured city shrinkage in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River based on whether city activities and population shrank from 2000 to 2010. This study drew on the Cobb-Douglas production function using multiple big data [such as nighttime light (NTL) data, patent data, and land transaction data] to calculate a city activity index to examine city activity. The geographically weighted regression (GWR) model was applied to explore the influencing factors of city shrinkage. Results showed the following: (1) in the area of study, 14.87% of cities experienced population loss, considering the city activities, an increase in the latter accounted for 57.36% in depopulation cities; (2) urban shrinkage spatial pattern presented the feature of “overall growth, local shrinkage”; (3) in the urban shrinkage regression model, urban spatial expansion and the increase in secondary industry population were factors that aggravated urban shrinkage. The main influencing factors of city shrinkage in the regions are different and need to be studied in-depth and meticulously in combination with the local development situation. This study plays a vital role in characterizing city activities and identifying urban shrinkage while providing a reference for urban planning and policy setting.  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0733-9488 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3180  
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Author Thoenen J.; Ripper D.; Duke E. url  openurl
  Title Light Pollution And Immunosuppression: Determining The Role Of Artificial Lighting In Coccidiosis In Non-Migratory Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Bluebird Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 86 Issue 3 Pages 131 - 140  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light pollution is a result of artificial light at night (ALAN), which inhibits many natural cycles of living organisms. Birds and other animals, including humans, are affected through hormonal discrep- ancies and circadian disruption. However, the effects of light pollu- tion on an animal’s immune response to pathogens have not been adequately investigated.

For this study non-migratory birds were chosen to determine the impact of light pollution within a certain area--urban, suburban, and rural. Fecal samples were taken from non-migratory bird spe- cies in areas that were classified based on sky quality meter read- ings measured in magnitude/arc second2. All fecal samples were an- alyzed for the presence of coccidia, a parasite usually found in avian species. A correlation was then made between the number of coccidia-infected individuals and the nocturnal light intensity at each location.

Results demonstrated that non-migratory birds were significantly (p < 0.05) more susceptible to contracting coccidiosis when exposed to a greater intensity of light pollution. This supports the hypothesis that light pollution causes negative ecological and economic impacts by disrupting natural cycles and instigating immunosuppression. This could potentially result in lower product yield and an increase in the need for pharmaceuticals for poultry farmers because the ALAN used at farms throughout the duration of the night may cause infection and inhibition of natural cycles of poultry.
 
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3179  
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