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Author Niu, W.; Xia, H.; Wang, R.; Pan, L.; Meng, Q.; Qin, Y.; Li, R.; Zhao, X.; Bian, X.; Zhao, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research on Large-Scale Urban Shrinkage and Expansion in the Yellow River Affected Area Using Night Light Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 5  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract As the land use issue, caused by urban shrinkage in China, is becoming more and more prominent, research on urban shrinkage and expansion has become particularly challenging and urgent. Based on the points of interest (POI) data, this paper redefines the scope, quantity, and area of natural cities by using threshold methods, which accurately identify the shrinkage and expansion of cities in the Yellow River affected area using night light data in 2013 and 2018. The results show that: (1) there are 3130 natural cities (48,118.75 km2) in the Yellow River affected area, including 604 shrinking cities (8407.50 km2) and 2165 expanding cities (32,972.75 km2). (2) The spatial distributions of shrinking and expanding cities are quite different. The shrinking cities are mainly located in the upper Yellow River affected area, except for the administrative cities of Lanzhou and Yinchuan; the expanding cities are mainly distributed in the middle and lower Yellow River affected area, and the administrative cities of Lanzhou and Yinchuan. (3) Shrinking and expanding cities are typically smaller cities. The research results provide a quick data supported approach for regional urban planning and land use management, for when regional and central governments formulate the outlines of urban development monitoring and regional planning.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3225  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Peng, J.; Liu, Q.; Blaschke, T.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, Y.; Hu, Y.’na; Wang, M.; Xu, Z.; Wu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Integrating land development size, pattern, and density to identify urban–rural fringe in a metropolitan region Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal Landscape Ecol  
  Volume 35 Issue 9 Pages 2045-2059  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Context

Located between urban area and rural area, urban–rural fringe is challenged with urbanization related social-ecological problems. Accurately identifying the urban–rural fringe can help to integrated urban–rural development planning, especially in metropolitan region. Among the various case studies to identify the urban–rural fringe, land use degree and impervious surface area are widely used. However, both indexes are only focused on land development size, resulting in coarse identifying results.

Objectives

It is aimed to propose a three-dimensional approach to integrating land development size, pattern and density, in order to accurately identifying the urban–rural fringe.

Methods

Landsat TM and DMSP/OLS datasets were used to establish a three-dimensional index system consisting of land development size (LDS), land development pattern (LDP) and land development density (LDD). Self-Organizing Feature Map (SOFM) was applied to identify the urban–rural fringe of Beijing City, China.

Results

From 2001 to 2009, the inner boundary of the urban–rural fringe had expanded to outside the fifth ring road. Likewise, the outer boundary moved from the fifth to the sixth ring road. The new urban development zone was the main area of urban expansion controlled by urban planning, where the increments of urban–rural fringe was 1273.5 km2, accounting for 75.24% of the whole city. Partial correlation analysis indicated that LDS played a leading role in SOFM clustering, but the spatial continuity of the urban–rural fringe was the best when it was integrated with LDP and LDD, especially the latter to comprehensively define and quantify land development intensity.

Conclusions

The integration of land development size, pattern and density is effective to quantify land development intensity, and thus to identify the urban–rural fringe in metropolitan regions.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0921-2973 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3224  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ardavani O. url  openurl
  Title Alternatives to artificial lighting: Varying patterns of bio-light in architecture Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Archidoct Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 80-91  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract The notion of variability is identical to the phenomenon of light.The present paper examines characteristics that shape this variability, in all forms of light, both natural and artificial, as well as light that is experimentally produced in a laboratory environment, through genetic modification of plants, in line with current trend of architectural fluidity. At a time when architecture is interacting with emerging technologies by creating parametrically changing shells and environments, that are evolving as biological models and organisms, lighting is becoming a tool for highlighting forms while ensuring the functionality of spaces. It is up to the designer to manage these variables of light in an inspired way, in order to create an elegant, sustainable and environmentally friendly environment for all beings.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2309-0103 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3223  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mills, W.; Martin, K.; Cathey, J. url  openurl
  Title Light and Lighting Basics for OSH Professionals Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Professional Safety Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 65 Issue 07 Pages 22-30  
  Keywords Review; Human Health; Lighting; Safety  
  Abstract Visible light is all around us, from sunlight to street lighting and automobile headlights to the backlight on a smartphone and in nearly every indoor space. Humans are so accustomed to working and living in artificial light that many of us have not stopped to consider the implications. Most OSH professionals’ experience with light and artificial lighting is likely limited to assessing whether sufficient light exists for people to see where they are going or carry out a task, or whether a light is too bright. This article aims to provide a current review of lighting for OSH professionals. Such a review is timely due to emerging issues including energy efficiency, human health impacts (e.g., blue light hazard, circadian rhythm disruption, fatigue), human performance (e.g., visual performance, visual comfort) and environmental impacts (e.g., light pollution).  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0099-0027 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial (down) 3222  
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Author Reiter, R.J.; Sharma, R.; Ma, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Switching diseased cells from cytosolic aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation: A metabolic rhythm regulated by melatonin? Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res  
  Volume 70 Issue 1 Pages e12677  
  Keywords Commentary; Animals; Human Health; Alzheimer disease; Warburg metabolism; cancer; circadian rhythm; fibrosis; mitochondria  
  Abstract This commentary reviews the concept of the circadian melatonin rhythm playing an essential role in reducing the development of diseases such as solid tumors which adopt cytosolic aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) to support their enhanced metabolism. Experimental data show that solid mammary tumors depend on aerobic glycolysis during the day but likely revert to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation at night for ATP production. This conversion of diseased cells during the day to a healthier phenotype at night occurs under control of the circulating melatonin rhythm. When the nocturnal melatonin rise is inhibited by light exposure at night, cancer cells function in the diseased state 24/7. The ability of melatonin to switch cancer cells as well as other diseased cells, for example, Alzheimer disease, fibrosis, hyperactivation of macrophages, etc, from aerobic glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation may be a basic protective mechanism to reduce pathologies.  
  Address Department of Cell Systems and Anatomy, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32621295 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 3221  
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