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Author Nam, S.; Park, S.-E.; Shin, H.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Accessing the economic value of night view of bridge using contingent valuation method: the case of South Korea's Han-River bridge Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research Abbreviated Journal Int. J. of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Res.  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages 360-370  
  Keywords Economics; South Korea; Korea; Han River Bridge; contingent valuation method; Viewshed analysis; Seoul  
  Abstract Purpose

The purpose of this study is to estimate an individual’s probability of preservation the night view of Han-River Bridge at tax using the CVM; and to present the effects of 4Es on experience economy theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The on-site survey was conducted in the 11 district Han-river parks; Gwangnaru, Jamsil, Ttukseom, Jamwon, Banpo, Yeechon, Yeouido, Mangwon, Nanji, Ganseo and Yanghwa district including 24 bridge ssuch as Banpo, Olympic Bridge during the 8-9pm around the lighting and 9-10pm peak time of lighting.

Findings

Truncated mean WTP indicates that the economic value of the night view of Han-River Bridge is 49,575 won (about U.S. $50) per household, which implies the significance of the preservation value of the night view.

Research limitations/implications

This study sets a hypothetical market and there are limitations on hypothetical bias of the DC CVM. For the future study, a survey with a specific real payment vehicle in an attempt to reduce hypothetical bias can be a tool for the prevention of the overestimation.

Practical implications

Through the study, Seoul city has to invest aggressively on the night view landscape business of Han River bridge, which can become a landmark and lots of attraction effect of tourists. Since this study’s core aim was to justify the economic value of the night-view of the Han-River bridges, the estimated amount strongly supports the lighting business of the Han-River bridge.

Originality/value

The results of this research may help policy makers of Han-River to establish practical decision whether improving and preserving the Han-River’s night view lighting business are worth the value.
 
  Address Kyunghee University, Seoul, South Korea  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Emerald Group Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue (up) Edition  
  ISSN 1750-6182 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1216  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Solano Lamphar, H.A.; Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Urban night-sky luminance due to different cloud types: A numerical experiment Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.  
  Volume 48 Issue 8 Pages 1017-1033  
  Keywords Skyglow; modeling; urban; clouds; radiative transfer  
  Abstract In this paper, we analyse theoretically and numerically the sky glow in urban and suburban areas, focusing on the zenith-normalised luminance of a cloudy sky. The results suggest that the altitude of a cloud imposes important changes in the luminance distribution. Peak values of sky luminance can be observed at a distance d = R + h tan (z), where R is the city radius, and h is the cloud altitude. Fluctuations of the zenith-normalised luminance over the city are dictated by three effects, specifically (i) extinction and backscatter in the undercloud atmosphere, (ii) the cloud properties and (iii) the radiant intensity function of the dominant ground-based light sources. For high clouds, the aerosol optical property is evident at moderate elevation angles. The light beams emitted from different parts of the city propagate along different inclined trajectories before they contribute to the elevated zenith luminance of low clouds. Then, multiple factors combine together to form the light field at the ground, city-size and city emission pattern being of specific importance.  
  Address Cátedras CONACYT, Instituto de investigaciones Dr José María Luis Mora, Programa Interdisciplinario de Estudios Metropolitanos (CentroMet), Plaza Valentín Gómez Farías #12 Col. San Juan Mixcoac, México D.F. C.P 03730. E-mail: lamphar(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue (up) Edition  
  ISSN 1477-0938 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1225  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gabriel, K.M.A.; Kuechly, H.U.; Falchi, F.; Wosniok, W.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Resources of dark skies in German climatic health resorts Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol  
  Volume 61 Issue 2 Pages 11-22  
  Keywords Circadian rhythm; Germany; Health resorts; Light pollution; Regulation; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Illumination of nocturnal environments is increasing steadily worldwide. While there are some benefits for mankind, light at night affects animals, plants, and human health by blurring the natural distinction between day and night. International regulations exist to protect the environment for the maintenance of human health but nocturnal darkness is not considered. In Germany, cities and communities labeled as Climatic Health Resorts provide for high standards in air quality. However, their degree of nocturnal darkness is unexplored so far. In our study, we examined the degree of nocturnal darkness in German Climatic Health Resorts by two datasets based on georeferenced remote sensing data. The majority of Climatic Health Resorts (93.1 %) are able to offer a relative respite (>/= 20 mag/arcsec2) from a degraded nocturnal environment, while only 3.4 % are able to offer a dark, if by no means pristine, night environment (>/= 21 mag/arcsec2). Climatic Health Resorts emit less light as well as are less affected by night sky brightness compared to the average of non-classified communities. In combination with daytime requirements, the resorts provide conditions for a more distinct day-and-night-cycle than non-classified communities.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue (up) Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27192999 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1456  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S.; Ribas, S.; Kocifaj, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modal evaluation of the anthropogenic night sky brightness at arbitrary distances from a light source Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Journal of Optics Abbreviated Journal J. of Optics  
  Volume 17 Issue Pages 105607  
  Keywords Skyglow; light propagation, atmospheric optics, light pollution  
  Abstract The artificial emissions of light contribute to a high extent to the observed brightness of the night sky in many places of the world. Determining the all-sky radiance of anthropogenic origin requires solving the radiative transfer equation for ground-level light sources, generally resorting to a double-scattering approximation in order to account for the observed radiance patterns with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Since the all-sky radiance distribution produced by an elementary light source depends on the distance to the observer in a way that is not immediately obvious, the contributions of sources located at different distances have to be computed on an individual basis, solving for each one the corresponding scattering integrals. In this paper we show that these calculations may be significantly alleviated by using a modal approach, whereby the hemispheric night-sky radiance is expanded in terms of a convenient basis of two-dimensional (2D) orthogonal functions. Since the modal coefficients of this expansion do vary smoothly with the distance to the observer, the all-sky brightness distributions produced by light sources located at arbitrary intermediate distances can be efficiently estimated by interpolation, provided that the coefficients at a discrete set of distances are accurately determined beforehand.  
  Address Area de Optica, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela Campus Sur, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue (up) Edition  
  ISSN 2040-8986 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1235  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wakefield, A.; Stone, E.L.; Jones, G.; Harris, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal Roy. Soc. Open Sci.  
  Volume 2 Issue 8 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; artificial lighting; light-emitting diode; street lights; bats; moth predation; Nyctalus  
  Abstract The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed ‘powerdive’ flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue (up) Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1237  
Permanent link to this record
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