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Author Tosini, G.; Ferguson, I.; Tubota, K.
Title Effects of blue light on the circadian system and eye physiology Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Molecular Vision Abbreviated Journal Mol Vis
Volume 22 Issue Pages 61-72
Keywords Vision; blue light; Circadian Rhythm; eye; physiology
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been used to provide illumination in industrial and commercial environments. LEDs are also used in TVs, computers, smart phones, and tablets. Although the light emitted by most LEDs appears white, LEDs have peak emission in the blue light range (400–490 nm). The accumulating experimental evidence has indicated that exposure to blue light can affect many physiologic functions, and it can be used to treat circadian and sleep dysfunctions. However, blue light can also induce photoreceptor damage. Thus, it is important to consider the spectral output of LED-based light sources to minimize the danger that may be associated with blue light exposure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effects of blue light on the regulation of physiologic functions and the possible effects of blue light exposure on ocular health.
Address Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
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Publisher NCBI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN 1090-0535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2216
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Author S Fotios, J Uttley
Title Illuminance required to detect a pavement obstacle of critical size Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 50 Issue Pages 390-404
Keywords Vision; Lighting
Abstract This paper investigates the illuminance needed to detect trip hazards for pedestrians walking after dark. In previous work, it was assumed that the critical obstacle height is 25 mm: further review of accident data and foot clearance data suggests instead that 10 mm is the critical height. Eye tracking records suggest a tendency for obstacles to be detected approximately 3.4 m ahead. Interpretation of obstacle detection data suggests horizontal photopic illuminances of up to 0.9 lux are required for peripheral detection of a 10 mm obstacle 3.4 m ahead, according to the scotopic/photopic ratio of the lighting and the age of the observer.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1765
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Author Fotios, S., Price, T
Title Road lighting and accidents: Why lighting is not the only answer Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Lighting Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 82 Issue 5 Pages 22-26
Keywords Lighting; Public Safety
Abstract Tony Price and Steve Fotios point out that while road lighting can be a significant counter measure to accidents, and that higher levels might help, the presence of road lighting does not guarantee all accidents will be avoided.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1767
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Author S Fotios, C Cheal, S Fox,
Title The transition between lit and unlit sections of road and detection of driving hazards after dark Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 51 Issue 2 Pages 243-261
Keywords Vision; Public Safety; Lighting; Planning
Abstract An experiment to investigate peripheral detection performance during a driver’s transition between lit and unlit sections of road was undertaken. The results suggest that when a driver moves from a lit to an unlit section of road their detection performance decreases almost immediately to that expected for the conditions of the unlit section and that there is no significant change in the subsequent 20-minute period. Tests were conducted at three luminances (0.1, 1.0 and 2.0 cd/m2): while an increase from 0.1 to 1.0 cd/m2 improved detection, a further increase to 2.0 cd/m2 did not. Lighting of two S/P ratios (0.65, 1.40) was examined at 1.0 cd/m2: this did not suggest an effect on detection performance. Taken together, these results suggest that, in the current context, visual performance reached a plateau at 1.0 cd/m2.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1769
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Author Min, J.-young; Min, K.-bok
Title Outdoor light at night and the prevalence of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors: a cross-sectional study in a nationally representative sample of Korean adults Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal Journal of Affective Disorders
Volume 227 Issue Pages 199-205
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Background

Outdoor light at night (LAN) is an increasingly prevalent type of environmental pollution. Studies have demonstrated that outdoor LAN can disrupt circadian rhythms, potentially contributing to insomnia, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic changes in humans. We investigated the association of outdoor LAN with depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors in South Korean adults.

Methods

This study used data from the 2009 Korean Community Health Survey, a representative sample dataset. Study population consisted of 113,119 participants for the assessment of depressive symptoms and 152,159 participants for the assessment of suicidal behavior. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Korean version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (depressive symptoms, score of > 16). Suicidal behaviors were defined as the experience of suicidal ideation or attempt. Outdoor LAN was estimated by satellite data from the National Centers for Environmental Information.

Results

Participants with depressive symptoms or history of suicidal behaviors were more likely to have exposure to outdoor LAN than those without depressive symptoms or suicidal behaviors. Compared with adults living in areas exposed to the lowest outdoor LAN, those living in areas exposed to the highest levels had higher likelihood depressive symptoms (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.15–1.46) or suicidal behaviors (OR = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.16–1.39). Significant dose-response relationships were observed between outdoor LAN and the odds of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors.

Conclusion

Outdoor LAN was found to be significantly associated with depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors, suggesting that it may be an environmental contributor to mental health problems.
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ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1777
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