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Author Wakefield, A.; Stone, E.L.; Jones, G.; Harris, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light-emitting diode street lights reduce last-ditch evasive manoeuvres by moths to bat echolocation calls Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal Roy. Soc. Open Sci.  
  Volume 2 Issue 8 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; artificial lighting; light-emitting diode; street lights; bats; moth predation; Nyctalus  
  Abstract The light-emitting diode (LED) street light market is expanding globally, and it is important to understand how LED lights affect wildlife populations. We compared evasive flight responses of moths to bat echolocation calls experimentally under LED-lit and -unlit conditions. Significantly, fewer moths performed ‘powerdive’ flight manoeuvres in response to bat calls (feeding buzz sequences from Nyctalus spp.) under an LED street light than in the dark. LED street lights reduce the anti-predator behaviour of moths, shifting the balance in favour of their predators, aerial hawking bats.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1237  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bará, S.; Espey, B.; Falchi, F.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Nievas, M., Pescatori, P., Ribas, S.J., Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Staubmann, P., Tapia Ayuga, C.; Wuchterl, G., Zamorano, J. url  openurl
  Title Report of the 2014 LoNNe Intercomparison Campaign Type Report
  Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue 32989 Pages  
  Keywords skyglow  
  Abstract The 2014 LoNNe (Loss of the Night Network) intercomparison campaign is the second of four campaigns planned during EU COST Action ES1204. The goal of these campaigns is to understand systematic uncertainty inherent in observations of skyglow (light pollution). An innovation of this year’s campaign was to take measurements with many of the nstruments at two sites: an urban location and a location far from artificial lights. This report summarizes the meeting, and also provides three recommendations for obtaining and analyzing handheld SQM observations.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Universidad Complutense Place of Publication Madrid Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title e-prints Complutense Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1254  
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Author Mège, P.; Ödeen, A.; Théry, M.; Picard, D.; Secondi, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Evolutionary Biology Abbreviated Journal Evol. Biol.  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-10  
  Keywords Animals; Caudata; amphibians; ultraviolet; ultraviolet vision; opsin; photobiology; SWS1; Paralog gene; Tuning site; Nocturnal species; Sliding window; Ka/Ks  
  Abstract Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.  
  Address GECCO, Université d’Angers, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045, Angers, France; pascal.mege(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0071-3260 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1299  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Escofet, J.; Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reducing the circadian input from self-luminous devices using hardware filters and software applications Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.  
  Volume 49 Issue 4 Pages 481-496  
  Keywords Lighting; devices; circadian disruption; screens; self-luminous  
  Abstract The widespread use of self-luminous devices at nighttime (cell-phones, computers, and tablets) raises some reasonable concerns regarding their effects on human physiology. Light at night is a known circadian disruptor, particularly at short visible wavelengths, and it seems advisable to have practical tools for tailoring the spectral radiance of these displays. We analyse two possible strategies to achieve this goal, using hardware filters or software applications. Overall, software applications seem to offer, at the present time, the best trade-offs for controlling the light spectra emitted by existing devices. We submit that such tools should be included as a standard feature on any self-luminous device and that their default settings should be established according to the best available knowledge on the circadian effects of light.  
  Address Departament d'Ã’ptica i Optometria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Terrassa, Catalunya, Spain; salva.bara(at)usc.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1315  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rodríguez Martín, A.; Chiaradia, A.; Wasiak, P.; Renwick, L.; Dann, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Waddling on the Dark Side: Ambient Light Affects Attendance Behavior of Little Penguins Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 0748730415626010 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; birds; penguins; attendance; little penguin; Eudyptula minor; Phillip Island; Australia; photobiology; seabirds  
  Abstract Visible light on Earth largely comes from the sun, including light reflected from the moon. Predation risk is strongly determined by light conditions, and some animals are nocturnal to reduce predation. Artificial lights and its consequent light pollution may disrupt this natural behavior. Here, we used 13 years of attendance data to study the effects of sun, moon, and artificial light on the attendance pattern of a nocturnal seabird, the little penguin Eudyptula minor at Phillip Island, Australia. The little penguin is the smallest and the only penguin species whose activity on land is strictly nocturnal. Automated monitoring systems recorded individually marked penguins every time they arrived (after sunset) at or departed (before sunrise) from 2 colonies under different lighting conditions: natural night skylight and artificial lights (around 3 lux) used to enhance penguin viewing for ecotourism around sunset. Sunlight had a strong effect on attendance as penguins arrived on average around 81 min after sunset and departed around 92 min before sunrise. The effect of moonlight was also strong, varying according to moon phase. Fewer penguins came ashore during full moon nights. Moon phase effect was stronger on departure than arrival times. Thus, during nights between full moon and last quarter, arrival times (after sunset) were delayed, even though moonlight levels were low, while departure times (before sunrise) were earlier, coinciding with high moonlight levels. Cyclic patterns of moon effect were slightly out of phase but significantly between 2 colonies, which could be due to site-specific differences or presence/absence of artificial lights. Moonlight could be overridden by artificial light at our artificially lit colony, but the similar amplitude of attendance patterns between colonies suggests that artificial light did not mask the moonlight effect. Further research is indeed necessary to understand how seabirds respond to the increasing artificial night light levels.  
  Address Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Estación Biológica de Doñana, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Avda. Américo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Seville, Spain; airamrguez(at)ebd.csic.es  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (down) English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1345  
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