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Author Donners, M.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Groenendijk, D.; van Langevelde, F.; Bikker, J.W.; Longcore, T.; Veenendaal, E.
Title Colors of attraction: Modeling insect flight to light behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 434-440
Keywords Animals; ecology; Lighting
Abstract Light sources attract nocturnal flying insects, but some lamps attract more insects than others. The relation between the properties of a light source and the number of attracted insects is, however, poorly understood. We developed a model to quantify the attractiveness of light sources based on the spectral output. This model is fitted using data from field experiments that compare a large number of different light sources. We validated this model using two additional datasets, one for all insects and one excluding the numerous Diptera. Our model facilitates the development and application of light sources that attract fewer insects without the need for extensive field tests and it can be used to correct for spectral composition when formulating hypotheses on the ecological impact of artificial light. In addition, we present a tool allowing the conversion of the spectral output of light sources to their relative insect attraction based on this model.
Address Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29944198 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1944
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Author Kernbach, M.E.; Hall, R.J.; Burkett-Cadena, N.; Unnasch, T.R.; Martin, L.B.
Title Dim light at night: physiological effects and ecological consequences for infectious disease Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Integrative and Comparative Biology Abbreviated Journal Integr Comp Biol
Volume 58 Issue 5 Pages 995-1007
Keywords Animals
Abstract Light pollution has emerged as a pervasive component of land development over the past century. Several detrimental impacts of this anthropogenic influence have been identified in night shift workers, laboratory rodents, and a plethora of wildlife species. Circadian, or daily, patterns are interrupted by the presence of light at night and have the capacity to alter rhythmic physiological or behavioral characteristics. Indeed, biorhythm disruption can lead to metabolic, reproductive, and immunological dysfunction depending on the intensity, timing, duration and wavelength of light exposure. Light pollution, in many forms and by many pathways, is thus apt to affect the nature of host-pathogen interactions. However, no research has yet investigated this possibility. The goal of this manuscript is to outline how dim light at night (dLAN), a relevant and common form of light pollution, may affect disease dynamics by interrupting circadian rhythms and regulation of immune responses as well as opportunities for host-parasite interactions and subsequent transmission risk including spillover into humans. We close by proposing some promising interventions including alternative lighting methods or vector control efforts.
Address Department of Global Health, University of South Florida, Tampa FL
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1540-7063 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29939262 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1946
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Author de Jong, M.; Lamers, K.P.; Eugster, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; Da Silva, A.; Mateman, A.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.
Title Effects of experimental light at night on extra-pair paternity in a songbird Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 441-448
Keywords animals
Abstract Light pollution is increasing worldwide and significantly affects animal behavior. In birds, these effects include advancement of morning activity and onset of dawn song, which may affect extra-pair paternity. Advanced dawn song of males may stimulate females to engage in extra-pair copulations, and the earlier activity onset may affect the males' mate guarding behavior. Earlier work showed an effect of light at night on extra-pair behavior, but this was in an area with other anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we present a two-year experimental study on effects of light at night on extra-pair paternity of great tits (Parus major). Previously dark natural areas were illuminated with white, red, and green LED lamps and compared to a dark control. In 2014, the proportion of extra-pair young in broods increased with distance to the red and white lamps (i.e., at lower light intensities), but decreased with distance to the poles in the dark control. In 2013, we found no effects on the proportion of extra-pair young. The total number of offspring sired by a male was unaffected by artificial light at night in both years, suggesting that potential changes in female fidelity in pairs breeding close to white and red light did not translate into fitness benefits for the males of these pairs. Artificial light at night might disrupt the natural patterns of extra-pair paternity, possibly negates potential benefits of extra-pair copulations and thus could alter sexual selection processes in wild birds.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29952126 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1953
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Author Fotios, S.; Yao, Q.
Title The association between correlated colour temperature and scotopic/photopic ratio Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages 1365-1374
Keywords Vision; Lighting
Abstract The scotopic/photopic ratio (S/P) is a parameter that may be considered in the design of road lighting. This paper compares the S/P ratio and correlated colour temperature (CCT) for 297 light source spectra identified in IES Technical Memorandum TM-30-15 to test the assumption that higher S/P ratios demand higher CCTs. The results suggest that, for a given lamp type, there is a strong association between S/P ratio and CCT, and hence that for a given CCT only a small variation in S/P ratio is available. However, the results also suggest that a larger variation in S/P ratio is possible if the lighting designer is able to consider a change in lamp type.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1954
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Author Patel, J.S.; Radetsky, L.; Rea, M.S.
Title The Value of Red Light at Night for Increasing Basil Yield Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Canadian Journal of Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Plant Sci.
Volume 98 Issue 6 Pages 1321-1330
Keywords Plants
Abstract Sweet basil (<i>Ocimum basilicum L.</i>) is primarily used for culinary purposes, but it is also used in the fragrance and medicinal industries. In the last few years, global sweet basil production has been significantly impacted by downy mildew caused by <i>Peronospora belbahrii</i>. Nighttime exposure to red light has been shown to inhibit sporulation of <i>P. belbahrii</i>. The objective of this study was to determine if nighttime exposure to red light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ<sub>max</sub> = 625 nm) could increase plant growth (plant height and leaf size) and yield (number and weight of leaves) in basil plants. In two sets of greenhouse experiments, red light was applied at a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 60 µmol m<sup>-2</sup> s<sup>-1</sup> during the otherwise dark night for 10 hours (from 20:00 to 06:00). The results demonstrate that exposure to red light at night can increase the number of basil leaves per plant, plant height, leaf size (length and width), and leaf fresh and dry weight, compared to plants in darkness at night. The addition of incremental red light at night has the potential to be cost-effective for fresh organic basil production in controlled environments.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1955
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