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Author Rahman, S.A.; St Hilaire, M.A.; Lockley, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of spectral tuning of evening ambient light on melatonin suppression, alertness and sleep Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 177 Issue Pages 221-229  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract We compared the effects of bedroom-intensity light from a standard fluorescent and a blue- (i.e., short-wavelength) depleted LED source on melatonin suppression, alertness, and sleep. Sixteen healthy participants (8 females) completed a 4-day inpatient study. Participants were exposed to blue-depleted circadian-sensitive (C-LED) light and a standard fluorescent light (FL, 4100K) of equal illuminance (50lx) for 8h prior to a fixed bedtime on two separate days in a within-subject, randomized, cross-over design. Each light exposure day was preceded by a dim light (<3lx) control at the same time 24h earlier. Compared to the FL condition, control-adjusted melatonin suppression was significantly reduced. Although subjective sleepiness was not different between the two light conditions, auditory reaction times were significantly slower under C-LED conditions compared to FL 30min prior to bedtime. EEG-based correlates of alertness corroborated the reduced alertness under C-LED conditions as shown by significantly increased EEG spectral power in the delta-theta (0.5-8.0Hz) bands under C-LED as compared to FL exposure. There was no significant difference in total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE%), and slow-wave activity (SWA) between the two conditions. Unlike melatonin suppression and alertness, a significant order effect was observed on all three sleep variables, however. Individuals who received C-LED first and then FL had increased TST, SE% and SWA averaged across both nights compared to individuals who received FL first and then C-LED. These data show that the spectral characteristics of light can be fine-tuned to attenuate non-visual responses to light in humans.  
  Address Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, United States; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, United States; Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, United States  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28472667 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1659  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ouyang, J.Q.; de Jong, M.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Matson, K.D.; Haussmann, M.F.; Meerlo, P.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Restless roosts: Light pollution affects behavior, sleep, and physiology in a free-living songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 11 Pages 4987-4994  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract The natural nighttime environment is increasingly polluted by artificial light. Several studies have linked artificial light at night to negative impacts on human health. In free-living animals, light pollution is associated with changes in circadian, reproductive, and social behavior, but whether these animals also suffer from physiologic costs remains unknown. To fill this gap, we made use of a unique network of field sites which are either completely unlit (control), or are artificially illuminated with white, green, or red light. We monitored nighttime activity of adult great tits, Parus major, and related this activity to within-individual changes in physiologic indices. Because altered nighttime activity as a result of light pollution may affect health and well-being, we measured oxalic acid concentrations as a biomarker for sleep restriction, acute phase protein concentrations and malaria infection as indices of immune function, and telomere lengths as an overall measure of metabolic costs. Compared to other treatments, individuals roosting in the white light were much more active at night. In these individuals, oxalic acid decreased over the course of the study. We also found that individuals roosting in the white light treatment had a higher probability of malaria infection. Our results indicate that white light at night increases nighttime activity levels and sleep debt and affects disease dynamics in a free-living songbird. Our study offers the first evidence of detrimental effects of light pollution on the health of free-ranging wild animals.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28597541 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1669  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Riveros, J.L.; Correa, L.M.; Schuler, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Daylight effect on melatonin secretion in adult female guanacos (Lama guanicoe) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Reproduction in Domestic Animals = Zuchthygiene Abbreviated Journal Reprod Domest Anim  
  Volume 52 Issue 6 Pages 1129-1132  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The wild South American camelids developed a strategy of seasonal reproduction during spring and summer with singleton birth. The photoperiod is one of the factors that may modulate this seasonality where light would be translated into a hormonal signal. This study evaluated the influence of changes in daily light intensity on melatonin concentration in captive guanacos under a long-day photoperiod (16 hr light/8 hr dark; 33 '28'S). Mean melatonin concentration was 28.3 +/- 20.3 pg/ml, with a maximum of 52.14 +/- 17.19 pg/ml at 23:30 and minimum of 14.29 +/- 6.64 pg/ml at 08:30 (p < .001). There was a negative association between light intensity and melatonin concentration (r = -0.57; p < .001). The results indicate that guanacos respond to variation in daily environmental light with a hormonal response and point to a circannual rhythm as a function of the photoperiod.  
  Address Departamento de Ciencias Animales, Facultad de Agronomia e Ingenieria Forestal, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0936-6768 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28731219 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1688  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jechow, A.; Kolláth, Z.; Ribas, S.J.; Spoelstra, H.; Hölker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Imaging and mapping the impact of clouds on skyglow with all-sky photometry Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 7 Issue 1 Pages Article number 6741  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Artificial skyglow is constantly growing on a global scale, with potential ecological consequences ranging up to affecting biodiversity. To understand these consequences, worldwide mapping of skyglow for all weather conditions is urgently required. In particular, the amplification of skyglow by clouds needs to be studied, as clouds can extend the reach of skyglow into remote areas not affected by light pollution on clear nights. Here we use commercial digital single lens reflex cameras with fisheye lenses for all-sky photometry. We track the reach of skyglow from a peri-urban into a remote area on a clear and a partly cloudy night by performing transects from the Spanish town of Balaguer towards Montsec Astronomical Park. From one single all-sky image, we extract zenith luminance, horizontal and scalar illuminance. While zenith luminance reaches near-natural levels at 5&#8201;km distance from the town on the clear night, similar levels are only reached at 27&#8201;km on the partly cloudy night. Our results show the dramatic increase of the reach of skyglow even for moderate cloud coverage at this site. The powerful and easy-to-use method promises to be widely applicable for studies of ecological light pollution on a global scale also by non-specialists in photometry.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1691  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Raap, T.; Pinxten, R.; Eens, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Rigorous field experiments are essential to understand the genuine severity of light pollution and to identify possible solutions Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages 5024-5026  
  Keywords commentary; animals  
  Abstract Ouyang et al. (2017; hereafter O2017) claim to have offered evidence that light pollution affects the health of free-living great tits (Parus major). Since 2012, they illuminated forests with either white, green, red or no artificial light at night (ALAN; Figure 1). Individuals in the white light treatment showed an increase in nightly activity in March 2014, which was linked to changes in health and physiology from March to May 2014. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address Department of Biology, Behavioural Ecology and Ecophysiology Group, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28746741 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1695  
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