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Author Point, S.
Title Blue Light Hazard: are exposure limit values protective enough for newborn infants? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Radioprotection Abbreviated Journal
Volume 53 Issue 3 Pages 219-224
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Blue Light Hazard is an emerging concern for health of population. Nevertheless, acute exposure to blue rays from artificial light is well taken into account by normative requirements applicable to lamps engineering and risk for general population is low. There is also no evidence for a chronic effect of artificial lighting on retina for general population at radiance below exposure limit values. That said, children in the very first years of life constitute a specific population to consider. On one side, eye anatomy of very young infants is different from elder young people or adults. On the other side, infants can be in close contact with some luminous toys or night lights. This paper presents a first approach for taking into account the specific anatomy of newborn infants’ eyes in blue light hazard evaluation. Results show that differences of crystalline lens transparency, focal length and pupil diameter could induce a significantly higher retinal exposure than for adult.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1982
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Author Kinzey, B.R.; Perrin, T.E.; Miller, N.J.; Kocifaj, M.; Aubé, M.; Lamphar, H.A.
Title An investigation of LED street lighting's impact on sky glow Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume PNNL-26411 Issue Pages
Keywords Skyglow; Lighting
Abstract A significant amount of public attention has recently focused on perceived impacts of converting street lighting from incumbent lamp-based products to LED technology. Much of this attention pertains to the higher content of short wavelength light (commonly referred to as “blue light”) of LEDs and its attendant influences on sky glow (a brightening of the night sky that can interfere with astronomical observation and may be associated with a host of other issues). The complexity of this topic leads to common misunderstandings and misperceptions among the public, and for this reason the U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Program embarked on a study of sky glow using a well-established astronomical model to investigate some of the primary factors influencing sky glow. This report details the results of the investigation and attempts to present those results in terms accessible to the general lighting community. The report also strives to put the results into a larger context, and help educate interested readers on various topics relevant to the issues being discussed.
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Corporate Author Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States) Thesis
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2014
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Author Kumlien, L.
Title Observations on Bird Migration at Milwaukee Type Journal Article
Year 1888 Publication The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk
Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 325-328
Keywords Animals
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2019
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Author Beccali, M.; Bonomolo, M.; Leccese, F.; Lista, D.; Salvadori, G.
Title On the impact of safety requirements, energy prices and investment costs in street lighting refurbishment design Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Lighting; Economics; Energy; Planning
Abstract Street lighting is an indispensable feature for the night landscape of cities. It is important for road safety, users visual comfort, crime prevention and to augment the perceived personal safety. Realize and maintain an adequate street lighting service is very expensive for municipalities with significant impact on their budgets. For this reason, special attention should be paid to the design of new street lighting systems and to the refurbishment of existing ones, since many of them are inadequate. In light of this it is very important to implement street lighting designs that fulfil lighting requirements avoiding energy waste and light pollution and, at the same time, result economically sustainable for municipalities. In this paper, an original step by step methodology for the lighting, energy and economic analysis of street lighting refurbishment designs has been introduced and explained in detail. The methodology is suitable for use in cities of different sizes. As an applicative example, the methodology has been tested in the town of Pontedera (Italy) and the results are discussed, also providing a sensitivity analysis of the economic feasibility with respect to the variations of electricity prices and investment costs.
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ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2020
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Author Zeale, M.R.K.; Stone, E.L.; Zeale, E.; Browne, W.J.; Harris, S.; Jones, G.
Title Experimentally manipulating light spectra reveals the importance of dark corridors for commuting bats Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals
Abstract The rapid global spread of artificial light at night is causing unprecedented disruption to ecosystems. In otherwise dark environments, street lights restrict the use of major flight routes by some bats, including the threatened lesser horseshoe bat Rhinolophus hipposideros, and may disrupt foraging. Using radio tracking, we examined the response of individual female R. hipposideros to experimental street lights placed on hedgerows used as major flight routes. Hedgerows were illuminated on one side over four nights using lights with different emission spectra, while the opposite side of the hedge was not illuminated. Automated bat detectors were used to examine changes in overall bat activity by R. hipposideros and other bat species present. R. hipposideros activity reduced significantly under all light types, including red light, challenging a previously held assumption that red light is safe for bats. Despite this, R. hipposideros rapidly adapted to the presence of lights by switching their flight paths to the dark side of the hedgerow, enabling them to reach foraging sites without restriction. Red light had no effect on the activity of the other species present. Slow-flying Myotis spp. avoided orange, white and green light, while more agile Pipistrellus spp. were significantly more abundant at these light types compared to dark controls, most probably in response to accumulations of insect prey. No effect of any light type was found for Nyctalus or Eptesicus spp. Our findings demonstrate that caution must be used when promoting forms of lighting that are thought to be safe for wildlife before they are tested more widely. We argue that it is essential to preserve dark corridors free from light pollution to mitigate the impacts of artificial light at night on bat activity and movements. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30288876 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2021
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