|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Tan, M.K.
Title (down) Why do nocturnal grasshoppers and katydids “salute” to flash photography? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Entomological Science Abbreviated Journal Entomological Science
Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 216-219
Keywords Animals; Insects; grasshoppers; katydids; orthoptera
Abstract Nocturnal animals can be sensitive to powerful light from the environment. Anthropogenically induced perturbation to natural light regimes, including ecological light pollution and flash photography, can have wide‐reaching implications on the ecology and behavior. Ecological ramifications of strong lights were traditionally focused on vertebrates although there is now more focus on invertebrates. Nonetheless, there are still unanswered questions on visual ecology and evolution, particularly on individual‐level effects and of tropical species. Specifically, how invertebrate individuals react to strong light is generally undocumented. Based on opportunistic surveys around Southeast Asia, orthopterans, spotted using concentrated torchlight and exposed to sudden strong light intensity during flash macrophotography, were observed to screen themselves by positioning their foreleg over the dorsum of the compound eye. This resembled the orthopteran “saluting” to the camera. These observations provided empirical evidence of how high intensity light can unsettle orthopterans and other insects and further ecological and evolutionary hypotheses and questions can be raised to understand the effect of light pollution.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1343-8786 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2324
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davies, T.W.; Smyth, T.
Title (down) Why artificial light at night should be a focus for global change research in the 21st century Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 24 Issue 3 Pages 872-882
Keywords Commentary; Animals; Plants
Abstract The environmental impacts of artificial light at night have been a rapidly growing field of global change science in recent years. Yet, light pollution has not achieved parity with other global change phenomena in the level of concern and interest it receives from the scientific community, government and nongovernmental organizations. This is despite the globally widespread, expanding and changing nature of night-time lighting and the immediacy, severity and phylogenetic breath of its impacts. In this opinion piece, we evidence 10 reasons why artificial light at night should be a focus for global change research in the 21st century. Our reasons extend beyond those concerned principally with the environment, to also include impacts on human health, culture and biodiversity conservation more generally. We conclude that the growing use of night-time lighting will continue to raise numerous ecological, human health and cultural issues, but that opportunities exist to mitigate its impacts by combining novel technologies with sound scientific evidence. The potential gains from appropriate management extend far beyond those for the environment, indeed it may play a key role in transitioning towards a more sustainable society.
Address Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, Devon, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29124824 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2054
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Min, B.; O'Keeffe, Z.; Zhang, F.
Title (down) Whose Power Gets Cut? Using High-Frequency Satellite Images to Measure Power Supply Irregularity Type Book Whole
Year 2017 Publication Policy Research Working Papers Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In many parts of the developing world, access to electricity is uneven and inconsistent, characterized by frequent and long hours of power outages. Many countries now engage in systematic load shedding because of persistent power shortages. When and where electricity is provided can have important impacts on welfare and growth. But quantifying those impacts is difficult because utility-level data on power outages are rarely available and not always reliable. This paper introduces a new method of tracking power outages from outer space. This measure identifies outage-prone areas by detecting excess fluctuations in light outputs. To develop these measures, the study processed the complete historical archive of sub-orbital Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime imagery captured over South Asia on every night since 1993. The analysis computes annual estimates of the Power Supply Irregularity index for all 600,000 villages in India from 1993 to 2013. The Power Supply Irregularity index measures are consistent with ground-based measures of power supply reliability from the Indian Human Development Survey, and with feeder-level outage data from one of the largest utilities in India. The study's methods open new opportunities to study the determinants of power outages as well as their impacts on welfare.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The World Bank Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2109
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hamacher, D.W.; De Napoli, K.; Mott, B.
Title (down) Whitening the Sky: light pollution as a form of cultural genocide Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Dark Sky Studies Abbreviated Journal J of Dark Sky Studies
Volume 1 Issue in press Pages
Keywords Society; Blue-rich light sources; indigenous knowledge; aboriginal australia; torres strait islanders; decolonizing methodologies
Abstract Light pollution is actively destroying our ability to see the stars and disconnecting people from their deep-time connection to the sky, acting as a form of ongoing cultural and ecological genocide for Indigenous people around the world. Many traditional knowledge systems are based on the stars and peoples' ablity to observe and interpret them for a range of practical, social, and scientific purposes is critical. Efforts to reduce, minimise, or eliminate light pollution are being achieved with varying degrees of success, but the increased use of blue-light emitting LEDs as a cost-effective solution is worsening problems related to human health, wildlife, and astronomical heritage for the benefit of capitalistic economic growth. We provide a brief overview illustrating some of the important connections that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people maintain with the stars, as well as the worsening damage growing light pollution is causing to this ancient knowledge. We propose a transdisciplinary approach to solving the issues of growing light pollution, using a foundation based on Indigenous philosophies and decolonising methodologies.
Address ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics in Three Dimensions (ASTRO-3D), School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 30130, Australia; duane.hamacher@unimelb.edu.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher University of Utah Place of Publication USA Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2780
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ouyang, J.Q.; de Jong, M.; van Grunsven, R.H.; Matson, K.D.; Haussmann, M.F.; Meerlo, P.; Visser, M.; Spoelstra, K.
Title (down) What type of rigorous experiments are needed to investigate the impact of artificial light at night on individuals and populations? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 23 Issue 12 Pages e9-e10
Keywords Animals
Abstract In our recent paper on how artificial light at night (ALAN) affects within-individual changes in physiology, we used a unique experimental setup of colored LED lights to show effects on nighttime activity levels and physiology in free-living great tits, Parus major (Ouyang et al., 2017). Raap et al's response, entitled: “Rigorous field experiments are essential to understand the genuine severity of light pollution and to identify possible solutions” lists issues with our analyses (Raap et al., 2017). Rather than go into a detailed response, we use this forum to address the major critiques by answering the bigger question of what types of rigorous field experiments are needed to evaluate ALAN's impact. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address P.O. box 50, 6700 AB, Wageningen, Gelderland Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28886232 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1721
Permanent link to this record