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Author Franziska, K.; Franz, H.; Werner, K.
Title (up) Can skyglow reduce nocturnal melatonin concentrations in Eurasian perch? Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages 114324
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) changes the natural rhythm of light and darkness and can impair the biorhythms of animals, for example the nocturnal melatonin production of vertebrates, which serves as a proxy for daily physiological rhythms. Freshwater fish are exposed to ALAN in large urban and suburban areas in the form of direct light or in the form of skyglow, a diffuse brightening of the night sky through the scattered light reflected by clouds, atmospheric molecules, and particles in the air. However, investigations on the sensitivity of melatonin production of fish towards low intensities of ALAN in the range of typical skyglow are rare. Therefore, we exposed Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) to nocturnal illumination levels of 0.01 lx, 0.1 lx and 1 lx and a control group with dark nights and daylight intensities of 2900 lx in all groups. After ten days of exposure to the experimental conditions, tank water was non-invasively sampled every 3 h over a 24 h period and melatonin was measured by ELISA. Melatonin was gradually reduced in all treatments with increasing intensity of ALAN whereas rhythmicity was maintained in all treatment groups although at 1 lx not all evaluated parameters confirmed rhythmicity. These results show a high sensitivity of Eurasian perch towards ALAN indicating that low light intensities of 0.01 lx and 0.1 lx as they occur in urban and suburban areas in the form of skyglow can affect the physiology of Eurasian perch. Furthermore, we highlight how this may impact perch in their sensitivity towards lunar rhythms and the role of skyglow for biorhythms of temperate freshwater fish.
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ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2847
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Author Aarts, M.P.J.; Hartmeyer, S.L.; Morsink, K.; Kort, H.S.M.; de Kort, Y.A.W.
Title (up) Can Special Light Glasses Reduce Sleepiness and Improve Sleep of Nightshift Workers? A Placebo-Controlled Explorative Field Study Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 2 Issue 2 Pages 225-245
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Nightshift workers go against the natural sleep–wake rhythm. Light can shift the circadian clock but can also induce acute alertness. This placebo-controlled exploratory field study examined the effectiveness of light glasses to improve alertness while reducing the sleep complaints of hospital nurses working nightshifts. In a crossover within-subjects design, 23 nurses participated, using treatment glasses and placebo glasses. Sleepiness and sleep parameters were measured. A linear mixed model analysis on sleepiness revealed no significant main effect of the light intervention. An interaction effect was found indicating that under the placebo condition, sleepiness was significantly higher on the first nightshift than on the last night, while under the treatment condition, sleepiness remained stable across nightshift sessions. Sleepiness during the commute home also showed a significant interaction effect, demonstrating that after the first nightshift, driver sleepiness was higher for placebo than for treatment. Subjective sleep quality showed a negative main effect of treatment vs. placebo, particularly after the first nightshift. In retrospect, both types of light glasses were self-rated as effective. The use of light glasses during the nightshift may help to reduce driver sleepiness during the commute home, which is relevant, as all participants drove home by car or (motor) bike.
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ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2977
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Author Skoufias E.; Strobl E.; Tveit T.
Title (up) Can we Rely on VIIRS Nightlights to Estimate the Short-Term Impacts of Natural Disasters? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Policy Research Working Papers 9052 Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) nightlights are used to model damage caused by earthquakes, floods, and typhoons in five Southeast Asian countries (Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam). The data are used to examine the extent to which for each type of hazard there is a difference in nightlight intensity between affected and nonaffected cells based on (i) case studies of specific disasters, and (ii) fixed effect regression models akin to the double difference method to determine any effect that the different natural hazards might have had on the nightlight value. The results show little to no significance regardless of the methodology used, most likely due to noise in the nightlight data and the fact that the tropics have only a few days per month with no cloud cover.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3153
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Author Kuffer, M.; Pfeffer, K.; Sliuzas, R.; Taubenbock, H.; Baud, I.; van Maarseveen, M.
Title (up) Capturing the Urban Divide in Nighttime Light Images From the International Space Station Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal IEEE J. Sel. Top. Appl. Earth Observations Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 8 Pages 2578-2586
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Earlier studies utilizing coarse resolution DMSP-OLS nighttime light (NTL) imagery suggest a negative correlation between the amount of NTL and urban deprivation. The International Space Station (ISS) NTL images offer higher resolution images compared to DMSP-OLS or VIIRS images, allowing an analysis of intraurban NTL variations. The aim of this study is to examine the capacity of ISS images for analyzing the intraurban divide. NTL images of four cities (one African, two Asian, and one South American) have been processed and analyzed. The results show that deprived areas are generally the darker spots of built-up areas within cities, illustrating the urban divide in terms of access to street lighting. However, differences exist between cities: Deprived areas in the African city (Dar es Salaam) generally feature lower NTL emissions compared to the examined cities in South America (Belo Horizonte) and Asia (Mumbai and Ahmedabad). Beyond, variations exist in NTL emissions across deprived areas within cities. Deprived areas at the periphery show less NTL compared to central areas. Edges of deprived areas have higher NTL emissions compared to internal areas. NTL emission differences between types of deprived areas were detected. The correlation between ISS NTL images and population densities is weak; this can be explained by densely built-up deprived areas having less NTL compared to lower density formal areas. Our findings show ISS data complement other data to capture the urban divide between deprived and better-off areas and the need to consider socioeconomic conditions in estimating populations.
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ISSN 1939-1404 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2178
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Author Marimuthu C.; Kirubakaran V.
Title (up) Carbon and Energy Pay Back Period for the Solar Street Light using Life Cycle Assessment Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of ChemTech Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 3 Pages 1125-1130
Keywords Lighting; Economics
Abstract Electronic street lights are big consumers of energy, costing millions to cities and municipalities around the world. Solar Street light is one of the method to reduce the power consumption by generate the energy using the solar Photovoltaic panel. This system includes the power generators (panel), storage (batteries) and management (controller) as well as the light, poles and weather proof housing for batteries. Life cycle inventories are based on manufacturers data combined with additional calculation and assumption. The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology used in this research was based on the ISO 14040 and 14044 series. In this paper, the LCA method is used to investigate the environmental impacts of two types of street light technology, conventional street light and solar street light. The cradle to grave analysis for conventional and solar street light includes raw material extraction, production, uses and end of life scenario. The detail investigation has made for the existing solar street light present at Gandhigram Rural University, Dindigul Dist, Tamil Nadu. The specification of the solar street light is 80W capacity, 1.2 m2 area of panel and 135Ah – 12V battery. The total no of poles is 70. For the above system carbon intensity, Energy Pay Back Period and Carbon Pay Back Period have been calculated and compared with conventional street light. The result from the study will support local decision makers when seeking a balance between the environmental, financial and social requirements of public lighting services.
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ISSN 0974-4290 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3147
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