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Author Maggi, E.; Serôdio, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial Light at Night: A New Challenge in Microphytobenthos Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Marine Science Abbreviated Journal Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 7 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Plants  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has been recently recognized as a globally widespread anthropogenic disturbance, characterized by different intensities and spectra, as well as spatial and temporal variability. Among marine organisms, those living on coastal areas are particularly exposed to artificial light. Some recent studies anticipated a potential for influences of ALAN on microphytobenthos (MPB) on rocky shores, either direct or indirectly mediated by trophic relationships. Here we emphasize the need for further investigations in different habitats, as well as on synergistic interferences with other stressors already impinging on coastal areas. The study of effects of ALAN poses new challenges in MPB research, including those related to the use of instruments for measuring both the light environment and the functioning of microbial photoautotrophs at night, and to the development of common monitoring approaches and manipulative experiments.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2935  
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Author Brüning, A.; Hölker, F.; Wolter, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night: implications for early life stages development in four temperate freshwater fish species Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Aquatic Sciences Abbreviated Journal Aquat Sci  
  Volume 73 Issue 1 Pages 143-152  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract Flora and fauna have both evolved under a natural cycle of light and dark. But especially in urban areas, the night is now increasingly disturbed by artificial light. Many traits and behaviours in fish are triggered by a circadian clock, for example hatching and swim bladder inflation, which predominantly take place at dusk or night. As lighting becomes brighter and extends farther into rural areas, the distinction between day and night becomes increasingly blurred. Therefore, the loss of diurnal trigger by artificial light at night was hypothesized having deleterious effects on these traits and impact fish reproduction. To assess these effects, eggs of four native freshwater fishes, Eurasian perch Perca fluviatilis, roach Rutilus rutilus, bleak Alburnus alburnus and chub Leuciscus cephalus, were incubated under two different light conditions: a photoperiod of 14 h light:10 h darkness (LD) and continuous illumination (LL). The time to hatch and swim bladder inflation was recorded. The species showed inconsistent reactions to the light treatments. In roach and bleak, the time to 50% hatch was longer in LL, whereas continuous lighting had an accelerating effect in chub. Incubation in LL elongated the hatching period in perch and roach and, in perch, the onset of darkness seemed to trigger hatching. The swim bladder inflation was significantly promoted by continuous light in chub and bleak but was not affected in roach. In conclusion, nocturnal artificial illumination could have an effect on hatching and initial swim bladder filling by masking the day–night-change and thereby diminish the trigger effect. However, the reactions were species specific and the increase in variation indicated a lack of diurnal triggering, whilst a general deleterious effect of artificial light at night has not been identified on early life stages.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1015-1621 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 477  
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Author Berge, J.; Geoffroy, M.; Daase, M.; Cottier, F.; Priou, P.; Cohen, J.H.; Johnsen, G.; McKee, D.; Kostakis, I.; Renaud, P.E.; Vogedes, D.; Anderson, P.; Last, K.S.; Gauthier, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light during the polar night disrupts Arctic fish and zooplankton behaviour down to 200 m depth Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Communications Biology Abbreviated Journal Commun Biol  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages article 102  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract For organisms that remain active in one of the last undisturbed and pristine dark environments on the planet—the Arctic Polar Night—the moon, stars and aurora borealis may provide important cues to guide distribution and behaviours, including predator-prey interactions. With a changing climate and increased human activities in the Arctic, such natural light sources will in many places be masked by the much stronger illumination from artificial light. Here we show that normal working-light from a ship may disrupt fish and zooplankton behaviour down to at least 200 m depth across an area of >0.125 km2 around the ship. Both the quantitative and qualitative nature of the disturbance differed between the examined regions. We conclude that biological surveys in the dark from illuminated ships may introduce biases on biological sampling, bioacoustic surveys, and possibly stock assessments of commercial and non-commercial species.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2399-3642 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2837  
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Author Mcmunn, M. S., Yang, L. H., Ansalmo, A., Bucknam, K., Claret, M., Clay, C., Cox, K., Dungey, D. D., Jones, A., & Kim, A. Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial Light Increases Local Predator Abundance, Predation Rates, and Herbivory Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Entomology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 48 Issue 6 Pages 1331–1339  
  Keywords Animals; Predation; Arthropods; Ecology  
  Abstract Human activity is rapidly increasing the radiance and geographic extent of artificial light at night (ALAN) leading to alterations in the development, behavior, and physiological state of many organisms. A limited number of community-scale studies investigating the effects of ALAN have allowed for spatial aggregation through positive phototaxis, the commonly observed phenomenon of arthropod movement toward light. We performed an open field study (without restricted arthropod access) to determine the effects of ALAN on local arthropod community composition, plant traits, and local herbivory and predation rates. We found strong positive phototaxis in 10 orders of arthropods, with increased (159% higher) overall arthropod abundance under ALAN compared to unlit controls. The arthropod community under ALAN was more diverse and contained a higher proportion of predaceous arthropods (15% vs 8%). Predation of immobilized flies occurred 3.6 times faster under ALAN; this effect was not observed during the day. Contrary to expectations, we also observed a 6% increase in herbivory under ALAN. Our results highlight the importance of open experimental field studies in determining community-level effects of ALAN.  
  Address Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA; mmcmunn(at)gmail.com  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2725  
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Author Duarte, C.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Anguita, C.; Manríquez, P.H.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Silva-Rodriguez, E.A.; Miranda, C.; Manríquez, K.; Quijón, P.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light pollution at night (ALAN) disrupts the distribution and circadian rhythm of a sandy beach isopod Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume 248 Issue Pages 565-573  
  Keywords Animals; isopod; Tylos spinulosus; Chile; beaches; mesocosms  
  Abstract Coastal habitats, in particular sandy beaches, are becoming increasingly exposed to artificial light pollution at night (ALAN). Yet, only a few studies have this far assessed the effects of ALAN on the species inhabiting these ecosystems. In this study we assessed the effects of ALAN on Tylos spinulosus, a prominent wrack-consumer isopod living in sandy beaches of north-central Chile. This species burrows in the sand during daylight and emerges at night to migrate down-shore, so we argue it can be used as a model species for the study of ALAN effects on coastal nocturnal species. We assessed whether ALAN alters the distribution and locomotor activity of this isopod using a light system placed in upper shore sediments close to the edge of the dunes, mimicking light intensities measured near public lighting. The response of the isopods was compared to control transects located farther away and not exposed to artificial light. In parallel, we measured the isopods’ locomotor activity in the laboratory using actographs that recorded their movement within mesocosms simulating the beach surface. Measurements in the field indicated a clear reduction in isopod abundance near the source of the light and a restriction of their tidal distribution range, as compared to control transects. Meanwhile, the laboratory experiments showed that in mesocosms exposed to ALAN, isopods exhibited reduced activity and a circadian rhythm that was altered and even lost after a few days. Such changes with respect to control mesocosms with a natural day/night cycle suggest that the changes observed in the field were directly related to a disruption in the locomotor activity of the isopods. All together these results provide causal evidence of negative ALAN effects on this species, and call for further research on other nocturnal sandy beach species that might become increasingly affected by ALAN.  
  Address Departamento de Ecología y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2228  
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