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Author Sielachowska, M., & Zajkowski, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Assessment of Light Pollution Based on the Analysis of Luminous Flux Distribution in Sports Facilities Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Engineer of the XXI Century Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 70 Issue Pages 139-150  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract The article attempts to assess the amount of light pollution with artificial light from sports facilities. The football stadium has been analysed, while considering a few configurations that take into account different coefficients of reflection of the luminous flux for the tribunes and the object main board. Simplified model of the football stadium was introduced to the DIALux simulation software, and then computer calculations were made for selected variants. In addition, the applicable normative requirements in the field of lighting systems were discussed and the mathematical distribution of the luminous flux in the examined sports facility was presented.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2504  
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Author Li, X.; Liu, Z.; Chen, X.; Meng, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Assessment of the impact of the 2010 Haiti earthquake on human activity based on DMSP/OLS time series nighttime light data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Rem. Sens.  
  Volume 13 Issue 04 Pages 1  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Earthquake disasters and postdisaster reconstruction have profound impacts on human society. We use time series nighttime light images collected by the defense meteorological satellite program-operational linescan system sensors as a proxy data source for human activities (HAs). After calibration, a time series analysis method is used to study the distribution and intensity of the changes in HAs after an earthquake. We consider the Haiti earthquake an example to analyze the HA sequence patterns and the aggregation patterns of the HA centers. The results show the following: (1) postearthquake recovery and reconstruction efforts led to increases in the long-term HAs, but the level of increased HA was usually low. (2) The level of postearthquake HAs in the most affected areas (seismic intensity zone VIII+) increased, whereas the postearthquake HAs in severely affected areas (seismic intensity zones VI and VII) were more fragmented. (3) The recovery of HAs in seismic intensity zone VIII+ (mainly Port-au-Prince) required 2 years, but the actual time may be far longer.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1931-3195 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2748  
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Author Eberenz, S.; Stocker, D.; Röösli, T.; Bresch, D.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Asset exposure data for global physical risk assessment Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Earth System Science Data Abbreviated Journal Earth Syst. Sci. Data  
  Volume 12 Issue 2 Pages 817-833  
  Keywords Economics  
  Abstract One of the challenges in globally consistent assessments of physical climate risks is the fact thatasset exposure data are either unavailable or restricted to single countries or regions. We introduce a globalhigh-resolution asset exposure dataset responding to this challenge. The data are produced using “lit population”(LitPop), a globally consistent methodology to disaggregate asset value data proportional to a combination ofnightlight intensity and geographical population data. By combining nightlight and population data, unwantedartefacts such as blooming, saturation, and lack of detail are mitigated. Thus, the combination of both data typesimproves the spatial distribution of macroeconomic indicators. Due to the lack of reported subnational assetdata, the disaggregation methodology cannot be validated for asset values. Therefore, we compare disaggregatedgross domestic product (GDP) per subnational administrative region to reported gross regional product (GRP)values for evaluation. The comparison for 14 industrialized and newly industrialized countries shows that thedisaggregation skill for GDP using nightlights or population data alone is not as high as using a combinationof both data types. The advantages of LitPop are global consistency, scalability, openness, replicability, and lowentry threshold. The open-source LitPop methodology and the publicly available asset exposure data offer valuefor manifold use cases, including globally consistent economic disaster risk assessments and climate changeadaptation studies, especially for larger regions, yet at considerably high resolution. The code is published onGitHub as part of the open-source software CLIMADA (CLIMate ADAptation) and archived in the ETH DataArchive with the link https://doi.org/10.5905/ethz-1007-226 (Bresch et al., 2019b). The resulting asset exposuredataset for 224 countries is archived in the ETH Research Repository with the link https://doi.org/10.3929/ethz-b-000331316 (Eberenz et al., 2019).  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1866-3516 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2883  
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Author Touitou, Y.; Reinberg, A.; Touitou, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Association between light at night, melatonin secretion, sleep deprivation, and the internal clock: Health impacts and mechanisms of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume 173 Issue Pages 94-106  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Exposure to Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) results in a disruption of the circadian system, which is deleterious to health. In industrialized countries, 75% of the total workforce is estimated to have been involved in shift work and night work. Epidemiologic studies, mainly of nurses, have revealed an association between sustained night work and a 50-100% higher incidence of breast cancer. The potential and multifactorial mechanisms of the effects include the suppression of melatonin secretion by ALAN, sleep deprivation, and circadian disruption. Shift and/or night work generally decreases the time spent sleeping, and it disrupts the circadian time structure. In the long run, this desynchronization is detrimental to health, as underscored by a large number of epidemiological studies that have uncovered elevated rates of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular risks, obesity, mood disorders and age-related macular degeneration. It amounts to a public health issue in the light of the very substantial number of individuals involved. The IARC has classified shift work in group 2A of “probable carcinogens to humans” since “they involve a circadian disorganization”. Countermeasures to the effects of ALAN, such as melatonin, bright light, or psychotropic drugs, have been proposed as a means to combat circadian clock disruption and improve adaptation to shift and night work. We review the evidence for the ALAN impacts on health. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding to combat the detrimental properties of exposure to ALAN and develop strategies of prevention.  
  Address UHSA – Groupe Hospitalier Paul Guiraud, 54, avenue de la Republique, 94806 Villejuif, France  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28214594 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2455  
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Author Esaki, Y.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N.; Kitajima, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Association between light exposure at night and manic symptoms in bipolar disorder: cross-sectional analysis of the APPLE cohort Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Human Health; Bipolar disorder; circadian rhythm; dark; light at night; manic symptom  
  Abstract Previous studies have found that keeping the room dark at night was associated with a decrease in manic symptoms for patients with bipolar disorder (BD). However, the association between light at night of real-life conditions and manic symptoms is unclear. We investigated the association between bedroom light exposure at night and manic symptoms in BD patients. One-hundred and eighty-four outpatients with BD participated in this cross-sectional study. The average light intensity at night during sleep was evaluated using a portable photometer for seven consecutive nights. Manic symptoms were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and scores >/=5 were treated as a “hypomanic state.” The median (interquartile range) YMRS score was 2.0 (0-5.0), and 52 (28.2%) participants were in a hypomanic state. The prevalence of a hypomanic state was significantly higher in the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than in those with <3 lux (36.7% versus 21.9%; P = .02). In multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for BD type, depressive symptoms, sleep duration, and daytime physical activity, the odds ratio (OR) for a hypomanic state was significantly higher for the participants with an average light intensity at night exposure of >/=3 lux than for those with <3 lux (OR: 2.15, 95% confidence interval: 1.09-4.22, P = .02). This association remained significant at the cutoff value of YMRS score >/=6 (OR: 2.51, 95% confidence interval: 1.15-5.46; P = .02). The findings of this study indicate bedroom light exposure at night is significantly associated with manic symptoms in BD patients. Although the results of this cross-sectional investigation do not necessarily imply causality, they may serve to inform beneficial nonpharmacological intervention and personalized treatment of BD patients.  
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, Japan  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32238002 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2879  
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