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Author Cabrera-Cruz, S.A.; Cohen, E.B.; Smolinsky, J.A.; Buler, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial Light at Night is Related to Broad-Scale Stopover Distributions of Nocturnally Migrating Landbirds along the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing  
  Volume 12 Issue 3 Pages 395  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The distributions of birds during migratory stopovers are influenced by a hierarchy of factors. For example, in temperate regions, migrants are concentrated near areas of bright artificial light at night (ALAN) and also the coastlines of large water bodies at broad spatial scales. However, less is known about what drives broad-scale stopover distributions in the tropics. We quantified seasonal densities of nocturnally migrating landbirds during spring and fall of 2011–2015, using two weather radars on the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico (Sabancuy and Cancun). We tested the influence of environmental predictors in explaining broad-scale bird stopover densities. We predicted higher densities in areas (1) closer to the coast in the fall and farther away in spring and (2) closer to bright ALAN and with lower ALAN intensity in both seasons. We found that birds were more concentrated near the coastline in the fall and away from it in spring around Cancun but not Sabancuy. Counter to our expectations, we detected increased bird densities with increased distance from lights in spring around Sabancuy, and in both seasons around Cancun, suggesting avoidance of bright areas during those seasons. This is the first evidence of broad-scale bird avoidance of bright areas during stopover.  
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  ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3004  
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Author Nuñez, J.D.; Bas, C.C.; Pérez García, M.; Ocampo, E.H.; Ribeiro, P.D.; Luppi, T.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night may increase the predation pressure in a salt marsh keystone species Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Marine Environmental Research Abbreviated Journal Marine Environmental Research  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 105285  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has the potential to alter ecological processes such as the natural dynamics of predator-prey interactions. Although understanding of ALAN effect on faunal groups has increased in recent years, few studies have explicitly tested for direct consequences of ALAN on predator-prey systems. Here, we evaluated the effect of ALAN on juvenile mortality due to cannibalism and general predation of the South American intertidal burrowing crab Neohelice granulata, a key ecosystem engineer of salt marshes. For this, we conducted tethering and crab enclosure experiments for both night and day periods during successive tidal floods in a semidiurnal tidal regime. Both experimental approaches were deployed simultaneously in the field and they lasted four consecutive days during new moon nights. ALAN was simulated by a white LED lamp (30W) with a solar panel as a source of power in five separated areas selected as replicates. For general predation, juvenile survival under ALAN was 44% lower than during the daytime and 61% lower than under natural dark conditions. For cannibalism, juvenile survival under ALAN and during the daytime was similar and about 30% lower than under natural dark conditions. We also found that the abundance of adult male crabs (cannibals) under ALAN was nearly five times higher than at natural dark conditions. Our field experiments provide evidence that ALAN can increase the mortality of juvenile crabs and is at least partially driven by cannibalistic interactions.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3424  
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Author Zubidat, A.E.; Fares, B.; Fares, F.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial Light at Night of Different Spectral Compositions Differentially Affects Tumor Growth in Mice: Interaction With Melatonin and Epigenetic Pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Cancer Control : Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center Abbreviated Journal Cancer Control  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 1073274818812908  
  Keywords Human Health; 6-Smt; Cfl; EE-halogen; GDM-levels; body mass; carbon; corticosterone; cosinor analysis; light at night; yellow-LED  
  Abstract Lighting technology is rapidly advancing toward shorter wavelength illuminations that offer energy-efficient properties. Along with this advantage, the increased use of such illuminations also poses some health challenges, particularly breast cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) of 4 different spectral compositions (500-595 nm) at 350 Lux on melatonin suppression by measuring its urine metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, global DNA methylation, tumor growth, metastases formation, and urinary corticosterone levels in 4T1 breast cancer cell-inoculated female BALB/c mice. The results revealed an inverse dose-dependent relationship between wavelength and melatonin suppression. Short wavelength increased tumor growth, promoted lung metastases formation, and advanced DNA hypomethylation, while long wavelength lessened these effects. Melatonin treatment counteracted these effects and resulted in reduced cancer burden. The wavelength suppression threshold for melatonin-induced tumor growth was 500 nm. These results suggest that short wavelength increases cancer burden by inducing aberrant DNA methylation mediated by the suppression of melatonin. Additionally, melatonin suppression and global DNA methylation are suggested as promising biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. Finally, ALAN may manifest other physiological responses such as stress responses that may challenge the survival fitness of the animal under natural environments.  
  Address 1 The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1073-2748 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30477310; PMCID:PMC6259078 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2143  
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Author Durrant, J.; Botha, L.M.; Green, M.P.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial light at night prolongs juvenile development time in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool B Mol Dev Evol  
  Volume 330 Issue 4 Pages 225-233  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A growing body of evidence exists to support a detrimental effect of the presence of artificial light at night (ALAN) on life-history and fitness traits. However, few studies simultaneously investigate multiple traits and the life stages at which changes manifest. We experimentally manipulated ALAN intensities, within those found in the natural environment, to explore the consequences for growth, survival, and reproductive success of the field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We reared crickets from egg to adult under a daily light-cycle consisting of 12 hr bright daylight (2,600 lx) followed by either 12 hr darkness (0 lx) or dim-light environments (1, 10, or 100 lx). We found egg hatch, adult survival, and reproductive measures were largely comparable for all treatments. However, juvenile development time (number of days from egg to adult) was on average 10 days (14%) longer and adults were also larger when crickets were exposed to any light at night (1, 10, or 100 lx). Our data demonstrate that chronic lifetime exposure to ALAN can modulate the timing of life-history events and may disrupt phenology to a similar extent as other abiotic factors.  
  Address The School of BioSciences, Faculty of Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1552-5007 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29862646 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1925  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Amichai, E.; Kronfeld-Schor, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Artificial Light at Night Promotes Activity Throughout the Night in Nesting Common Swifts (Apus apus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 11052  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The use of artificial light at night (ALAN) is a rapidly expanding anthropogenic effect that transforms nightscapes throughout the world, causing light pollution that affects ecosystems in a myriad of ways. One of these is changing or shifting activity rhythms, largely synchronized by light cues. We used acoustic loggers to record and quantify activity patterns during the night of a diurnal bird – the common swift – in a nesting colony exposed to extremely intensive artificial illumination throughout the night at Jerusalem's Western Wall. We compared that to activity patterns at three other colonies exposed to none, medium, or medium-high ALAN. We found that in the lower-intensity ALAN colonies swifts ceased activity around sunset, later the more intense the lighting. At the Western Wall, however, swifts remained active throughout the night. This may have important implications for the birds' physiology, breeding cycle, and fitness, and may have cascading effects on their ecosystems.  
  Address School of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31363144 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2594  
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