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Author Puschnig, J.; Wallner, S.; Posch, T.
Title (up) Circalunar variations of the night sky brightness – an FFT perspective on the impact of light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal
Volume 492 Issue 2 Pages 2622-2637
Keywords Skyglow; Moonlight
Abstract Circa-monthly activity conducted by moonlight is observed in many species on Earth. Given the vast amount of artificial light at night (ALAN) that pollutes large areas around the globe, the synchronization to the circalunar cycle is often strongly perturbed. Using 2-yr data from a network of 23 photometers (Sky Quality Meters; SQM) in Austria (latitude ∼48°), we quantify how light pollution impacts the recognition of the circalunar periodicity. We do so via frequency analysis of nightly mean sky brightnesses using Fast Fourier Transforms. A very tight linear relation between the mean zenithal night sky brightness (NSB) given in magSQMarcsec−2 and the amplitude of the circalunar signal is found, indicating that for sites with a mean zenithal NSB brighter than 16.5 magSQMarcsec−2 the lunar rhythm practically vanishes. This finding implies that the circalunar rhythm is still detectable (within the broad bandpass of the SQM) at most places around the globe, but its amplitude against the light polluted sky is strongly reduced. We find that the circalunar contrast in zenith is reduced compared to ALAN-free sites by factors of 19 in the state capital of Linz (∼200 000 inhabitants) and 13 in small towns, e.g. Freistadt and Mattighofen, with less than 10 000 inhabitants. Only two of our sites, both situated in national parks (Bodinggraben and Zöblboden), show natural circalunar amplitudes. At our urban sites, we further detect a strong seasonal signal that is linked to the amplification of anthropogenic skyglow during the winter months due to climatological conditions.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2838
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Author Li, S.; Cheng, L.; Liu, X.; Mao, J.; Wu, J.; Li, M.
Title (up) City type-oriented modeling electric power consumption in China using NPP-VIIRS nighttime stable light data Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume 189 Issue Pages 116040
Keywords Energy; Remote Sensing; China; electric power consumption; Night lights; Nighttime light; VIIRS-DNB
Abstract Accelerating urbanization has created tremendous pressure on the global environment and energy supply, making accurate estimates of energy use of great importance. Most current models for estimating electric power consumption (EPC) from nighttime light (NTL) imagery are oversimplified, ignoring influential social and economic factors. Here we propose first classifying cities by economic focus and then separately estimating each category’s EPC using NTL data. We tested this approach using statistical employment data for 198 Chinese cities, 2015 NTL data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and annual electricity consumption statistics. We used cluster analysis of employment by sector to divide the cities into three types (industrial, service, and technology and education), then established a linear regression model for each city's NTL and EPC. Compared with the estimation results before city classification (R2: 0.785), the R2 of the separately modeled service cities and technology and education cities increased to 0.866 and 0.830, respectively. However, the results for industrial cities were less consistent due to their more complex energy consumption structure. In general, using classification before modeling helps reflect factors affecting the relationship between EPC and NTL, making the estimation process more reasonable and improving the accuracy of the results.
Address School of Geography and Ocean Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2672
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Author Priyatikanto, R.; Mayangsari, L.; Prihandoko, R.A.; Admiranto, A.G.
Title (up) Classification of Continuous Sky Brightness Data Using Random Forest Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Advances in Astronomy Abbreviated Journal Advances in Astronomy
Volume 2020 Issue Pages 1-11
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Sky brightness measuring and monitoring are required to mitigate the negative effect of light pollution as a byproduct of modern civilization. Good handling of a pile of sky brightness data includes evaluation and classification of the data according to its quality and characteristics such that further analysis and inference can be conducted properly. This study aims to develop a classification model based on Random Forest algorithm and to evaluate its performance. Using sky brightness data from 1250 nights with minute temporal resolution acquired at eight different stations in Indonesia, datasets consisting of 15 features were created to train and test the model. Those features were extracted from the observation time, the global statistics of nightly sky brightness, or the light curve characteristics. Among those features, 10 are considered to be the most important for the classification task. The model was trained to classify the data into six classes (1: peculiar data, 2: overcast, 3: cloudy, 4: clear, 5: moonlit-cloudy, and 6: moonlit-clear) and then tested to achieve high accuracy (92%) and scores (F-score = 84% and G-mean = 84%). Some misclassifications exist, but the classification results are considerably good as indicated by posterior distributions of the sky brightness as a function of classes. Data classified as class-4 have sharp distribution with typical full width at half maximum of 1.5 mag/arcsec2, while distributions of class-2 and -3 are left skewed with the latter having lighter tail. Due to the moonlight, distributions of class-5 and -6 data are more smeared or have larger spread. These results demonstrate that the established classification model is reasonably good and consistent.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1687-7969 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2878
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Author Barrette, T.P.; Pike, A.M.
Title (up) Closed-Course Human Factors Evaluation of Marking and Marker Visibility Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record
Volume 2673 Issue 10 Pages 840-849
Keywords Vision; Transportation; Raised retroreflective pavement markers; retroreflectivity
Abstract Raised retroreflective pavement markers (RRPMs) are commonly used to provide nighttime delineation of roadways. Although RRPMs are visible during dry conditions, they provide their greatest benefit during wet-night conditions, when typical pavement markings become flooded and lose their retroreflectivite properties. Naturally, the retroreflectivity of RRPMs degrades over time as a result of traffic, ultraviolet light, precipitation, and roadway maintenance activities. Subsequently, it is necessary to examine the relationship between driver performance and the condition of the RRPMs. To assess visibility relative to RRPM condition, study participants rode in the passenger seat of a vehicle operated by a member of the research team, traveling at approximately 15 mph, for two laps around a closed course. Throughout each lap of the course, nine treatments consisting of RRPMs or preformed pavement marking tape of various retroreflectivity levels diverged from a center line to either the right or left. Participants indicated when they could tell which direction the treatment diverged, which was recorded using a GPS unit. A generalized linear model was estimated on a dataset constructed by pairing the observed distances from various treatments with demographic information about each participant. The analysis indicates the distance at which a particular treatment would be visible, which can then be converted to preview time to assess treatment adequacy for a variety of speeds. The RRPM treatments generally provided adequate preview time for older drivers based on the extant literature; however, the preformed pavement marking tape was less adequate at higher speeds and under overhead lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2499
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Author Barrette, T.P.; Pike, A.M.
Title (up) Closed-Course Human Factors Evaluation of Marking and Marker Visibility Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record
Volume 2673 Issue 10 Pages 840-849
Keywords Vision
Abstract Raised retroreflective pavement markers (RRPMs) are commonly used to provide nighttime delineation of roadways. Although RRPMs are visible during dry conditions, they provide their greatest benefit during wet-night conditions, when typical pavement markings become flooded and lose their retroreflectivite properties. Naturally, the retroreflectivity of RRPMs degrades over time as a result of traffic, ultraviolet light, precipitation, and roadway maintenance activities. Subsequently, it is necessary to examine the relationship between driver performance and the condition of the RRPMs. To assess visibility relative to RRPM condition, study participants rode in the passenger seat of a vehicle operated by a member of the research team, traveling at approximately 15 mph, for two laps around a closed course. Throughout each lap of the course, nine treatments consisting of RRPMs or preformed pavement marking tape of various retroreflectivity levels diverged from a center line to either the right or left. Participants indicated when they could tell which direction the treatment diverged, which was recorded using a GPS unit. A generalized linear model was estimated on a dataset constructed by pairing the observed distances from various treatments with demographic information about each participant. The analysis indicates the distance at which a particular treatment would be visible, which can then be converted to preview time to assess treatment adequacy for a variety of speeds. The RRPM treatments generally provided adequate preview time for older drivers based on the extant literature; however, the preformed pavement marking tape was less adequate at higher speeds and under overhead lighting.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2775
Permanent link to this record