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Author Murphy, B.A.
Title (up) Circadian and circannual regulation in the horse: Internal timing in an elite athlete Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Equine Veterinary Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Equine Veterinary Science
Volume 76 Issue Pages 14-24
Keywords Animals; Mammals; horses
Abstract Biological rhythms evolved to provide temporal coordination across all tissues and organs and allow synchronisation of physiology with predictable environmental cycles. Most important of these are circadian and circannual rhythms, primarily regulated via photoperiod signals from the retina. Understanding the nature of physiological rhythms in horses is crucially important for equine management. Predominantly, we have removed them from exposure to their natural environmental stimuli; the seasonally changing photoperiod, continuous foraging and feeding activity, social herd interactions and the continuous low intensity exercise of a grassland dweller. These have been replaced in many cases with confined indoor housing, regimental feeding and exercise times, social isolation and exposure to lighting that is often erratic and does not come close to mimicking the spectral composition of sunlight. We have further altered seasonal timing cues through the use of artificial lighting programs that impact reproductive behaviour, breeding efficiency and the development of youngstock. Understanding how these new environmental cues (some stronger, some weaker) impact the internal physiology of the horse in the context of the natural endogenous rhythms that evolved over millennia, is key to helping to improve equine health, welfare and performance, now and into the future. This review provides an overview of the field, highlights the recent discoveries related to biological timing in horses and discusses the implications that these findings may have for the production and management of the elite equine athlete.
Address Barbara A. Murphy, School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland; Barbara.murphy(at)ucd.ie
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elseverier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0737-0806 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2257
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Author Jan Stenvers, D.; Scheer, F.A.J.L.; Schrauwen, P.; la Fleur, S.E.; Kalsbeek, A.
Title (up) Circadian clocks and insulin resistance Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Nature Reviews. Endocrinology Abbreviated Journal Nat Rev Endocrinol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Insulin resistance is a main determinant in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The circadian timing system consists of a central brain clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and various peripheral tissue clocks. The circadian timing system is responsible for the coordination of many daily processes, including the daily rhythm in human glucose metabolism. The central clock regulates food intake, energy expenditure and whole-body insulin sensitivity, and these actions are further fine-tuned by local peripheral clocks. For instance, the peripheral clock in the gut regulates glucose absorption, peripheral clocks in muscle, adipose tissue and liver regulate local insulin sensitivity, and the peripheral clock in the pancreas regulates insulin secretion. Misalignment between different components of the circadian timing system and daily rhythms of sleep-wake behaviour or food intake as a result of genetic, environmental or behavioural factors might be an important contributor to the development of insulin resistance. Specifically, clock gene mutations, exposure to artificial light-dark cycles, disturbed sleep, shift work and social jet lag are factors that might contribute to circadian disruption. Here, we review the physiological links between circadian clocks, glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and present current evidence for a relationship between circadian disruption and insulin resistance. We conclude by proposing several strategies that aim to use chronobiological knowledge to improve human metabolic health.
Address Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN), Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW), Amsterdam, Netherlands. a.kalsbeek@nin.knaw.nl
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1759-5029 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30531917 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2133
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Author Abbott, S.M.; Malkani, R.G.; Zee, P.C.
Title (up) Circadian disruption and human health: A bidirectional relationship Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Circadian rhythm disorders have been classically associated with disorders of abnormal timing of the sleep-wake cycle, however circadian dysfunction can play a role in a wide range of pathology, ranging from the increased risk for cardiometabolic disease and malignancy in shift workers, prompting the need for a new field focused on the larger concept of circadian medicine. The relationship between circadian disruption and human health is bidirectional, with changes in circadian amplitude often preceding the classical symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. As our understanding of the importance of circadian dysfunction in disease grows, we need to develop better clinical techniques for identifying circadian rhythms and also develop circadian based strategies for disease management. Overall this review highlights the need to bring the concept of time to all aspects of medicine, emphasizing circadian medicine as a prime example of both personalized and precision medicine.
Address Department of Neurology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30549337 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2154
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Author Lee, H.-S.; Lee, E.; Moon, J.-H.; Kim, Y.J.; Lee, H.-J.
Title (up) Circadian disruption and increase of oxidative stress in male and female volunteers after bright light exposure before bed time Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular & Cellular Toxicology Abbreviated Journal Mol. Cell. Toxicol.
Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 221-229
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Backgrounds

Circadian rhythms are patterns of behaviour, physiology, and metabolism that occur within a period of approximately 24 h. The higher risk of breast and prostate cancers among shift workers, as well as the general population, are reported to be associated with circadian rhythm disruption caused by exposure to light at night. We focused on the effects of bright light before bed comparing effects between men and women.

Methods

Male and female healthy volunteers aged 20–30 were exposed to 4 hours of bright light before bed for 3 and 4 days.

Results

We analyzed the shift of circadian rhythms of subjects based on cortisol secretion patterns in response to short periods of bright-light exposure at bedtime. We also found an increase of oxidative stress including MDA, 8-OHdG, and total antioxidants in both male and female volunteers.

Conclusion

These results suggest that bright light exposure before sleep, often encounter in modern daily life, has a considerable influence on the human body. The chronic effects of light exposure before bed time such as the carcinogenic effects caused by circadian disruption and oxidative stress need further investigation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1738-642X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2331
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Author Vetter, C.
Title (up) Circadian disruption: What do we actually mean? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract The circadian system regulates physiology and behavior. Acute challenges to the system, such as those experienced during travel across time zones, will eventually result in re-synchronization to the local environmental time cues, but this re-synchronization is oftentimes accompanied by adverse short-term consequences. When such challenges are experienced chronically, adaptation may not be achieved, as for example in the case of rotating night shift workers. The transient and chronic disturbance of the circadian system is most frequently referred to as “circadian disruption”, but many other terms have been proposed and used to refer to similar situations. It is now beyond doubt that the circadian system contributes to health and disease, emphasizing the need for clear terminology when describing challenges to the circadian system and their consequences. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the terms used to describe disruption of the circadian system, discuss proposed quantifications of disruption in experimental and observational settings with a focus on human research, and highlight limitations and challenges of currently available tools. For circadian research to advance as a translational science, clear, operationalizable, and scalable quantifications of circadian disruption are key, as they will enable improved assessment and reproducibility of results, ideally ranging from mechanistic settings, including animal research, to large-scale randomized clinical trials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30402904 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2057
Permanent link to this record