|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Abbott, S.M.; Malkani, R.G.; Zee, P.C.
Title (up) Circadian disruption and human health: A bidirectional relationship Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract Circadian rhythm disorders have been classically associated with disorders of abnormal timing of the sleep-wake cycle, however circadian dysfunction can play a role in a wide range of pathology, ranging from the increased risk for cardiometabolic disease and malignancy in shift workers, prompting the need for a new field focused on the larger concept of circadian medicine. The relationship between circadian disruption and human health is bidirectional, with changes in circadian amplitude often preceding the classical symptoms of neurodegenerative disorders. As our understanding of the importance of circadian dysfunction in disease grows, we need to develop better clinical techniques for identifying circadian rhythms and also develop circadian based strategies for disease management. Overall this review highlights the need to bring the concept of time to all aspects of medicine, emphasizing circadian medicine as a prime example of both personalized and precision medicine.
Address Department of Neurology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30549337 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2154
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lee, H.-S.; Lee, E.; Moon, J.-H.; Kim, Y.J.; Lee, H.-J.
Title (up) Circadian disruption and increase of oxidative stress in male and female volunteers after bright light exposure before bed time Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular & Cellular Toxicology Abbreviated Journal Mol. Cell. Toxicol.
Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 221-229
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Backgrounds

Circadian rhythms are patterns of behaviour, physiology, and metabolism that occur within a period of approximately 24 h. The higher risk of breast and prostate cancers among shift workers, as well as the general population, are reported to be associated with circadian rhythm disruption caused by exposure to light at night. We focused on the effects of bright light before bed comparing effects between men and women.

Methods

Male and female healthy volunteers aged 20–30 were exposed to 4 hours of bright light before bed for 3 and 4 days.

Results

We analyzed the shift of circadian rhythms of subjects based on cortisol secretion patterns in response to short periods of bright-light exposure at bedtime. We also found an increase of oxidative stress including MDA, 8-OHdG, and total antioxidants in both male and female volunteers.

Conclusion

These results suggest that bright light exposure before sleep, often encounter in modern daily life, has a considerable influence on the human body. The chronic effects of light exposure before bed time such as the carcinogenic effects caused by circadian disruption and oxidative stress need further investigation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1738-642X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2331
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Vetter, C.
Title (up) Circadian disruption: What do we actually mean? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The European Journal of Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Eur J Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Human Health; Review
Abstract The circadian system regulates physiology and behavior. Acute challenges to the system, such as those experienced during travel across time zones, will eventually result in re-synchronization to the local environmental time cues, but this re-synchronization is oftentimes accompanied by adverse short-term consequences. When such challenges are experienced chronically, adaptation may not be achieved, as for example in the case of rotating night shift workers. The transient and chronic disturbance of the circadian system is most frequently referred to as “circadian disruption”, but many other terms have been proposed and used to refer to similar situations. It is now beyond doubt that the circadian system contributes to health and disease, emphasizing the need for clear terminology when describing challenges to the circadian system and their consequences. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the terms used to describe disruption of the circadian system, discuss proposed quantifications of disruption in experimental and observational settings with a focus on human research, and highlight limitations and challenges of currently available tools. For circadian research to advance as a translational science, clear, operationalizable, and scalable quantifications of circadian disruption are key, as they will enable improved assessment and reproducibility of results, ideally ranging from mechanistic settings, including animal research, to large-scale randomized clinical trials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0953-816X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30402904 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2057
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Stothard, E.R.; McHill, A.W.; Depner, C.M.; Birks, B.R.; Moehlman, T.M.; Ritchie, H.K.; Guzzetti, J.R.; Chinoy, E.D.; LeBourgeois, M.K.; Axelsson, J.; Wright, K.P.J.
Title (up) Circadian Entrainment to the Natural Light-Dark Cycle across Seasons and the Weekend Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol
Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 508-513
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Reduced exposure to daytime sunlight and increased exposure to electrical lighting at night leads to late circadian and sleep timing [1-3]. We have previously shown that exposure to a natural summer 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle entrains the human circadian clock to solar time, such that the internal biological night begins near sunset and ends near sunrise [1]. Here we show that the beginning of the biological night and sleep occur earlier after a week's exposure to a natural winter 9 hr 20 min:14 hr 40 min light-dark cycle as compared to the modern electrical lighting environment. Further, we find that the human circadian clock is sensitive to seasonal changes in the natural light-dark cycle, showing an expansion of the biological night in winter compared to summer, akin to that seen in non-humans [4-8]. We also show that circadian and sleep timing occur earlier after spending a weekend camping in a summer 14 hr 39 min:9 hr 21 min natural light-dark cycle compared to a typical weekend in the modern environment. Weekend exposure to natural light was sufficient to achieve approximately 69% of the shift in circadian timing we previously reported after a week's exposure to natural light [1]. These findings provide evidence that the human circadian clock adapts to seasonal changes in the natural light-dark cycle and is timed later in the modern environment in both winter and summer. Further, we demonstrate that earlier circadian timing can be rapidly achieved through natural light exposure during a weekend spent camping.
Address Department of Integrative Physiology, Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0354, USA. Electronic address: kenneth.wright@colorado.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28162893 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1633
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Mason, I.C.; Boubekri, M.; Figueiro, M.G.; Hasler, B.P.; Hattar, S.; Hill, S.M.; Nelson, R.J.; Sharkey, K.M.; Wright, K.P.; Boyd, W.A.; Brown, M.K.; Laposky, A.D.; Twery, M.J.; Zee, P.C.
Title (up) Circadian Health and Light: A Report on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Workshop Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 451-457
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Despite the omnipresence of artificial and natural light exposure, there exists little guidance in the United States and elsewhere on light exposure in terms of timing, intensity, spectrum, and other light characteristics known to affect human health, performance, and well-being; in parallel, there is little information regarding the quantity and characteristics of light exposure that people receive. To address this, the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, in the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, held a workshop in August 2016 on circadian health and light. Workshop participants discussed scientific research advances on the effects of light on human physiology, identified remaining knowledge gaps in these research areas, and articulated opportunities to use appropriate lighting to protect and improve circadian-dependent health. Based on this workshop, participants put forth the following strategic intent, objectives, and strategies to guide discovery, measurement, education, and implementation of the appropriate use of light to achieve, promote, and maintain circadian health in modern society.
Address Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30033850 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1975
Permanent link to this record