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Author Gong, P.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Bai, Y.; Chen, B.; Hu, T.; Liu, X.; Xu, B.; Yang, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Annual maps of global artificial impervious area (GAIA) between 1985 and 2018 Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 236 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Artificial impervious areas are predominant indicators of human settlements. Timely, accurate, and frequent information on artificial impervious areas is critical to understanding the process of urbanization and land use/cover change, as well as of their impacts on the environment and biodiversity. Despite their importance, there still lack annual maps of high-resolution Global Artificial Impervious Areas (GAIA) with longer than 30-year records, due to the high demand of high performance computation and the lack of effective mapping algorithms. In this paper, we mapped annual GAIA from 1985 to 2018 using the full archive of 30-m resolution Landsat images on the Google Earth Engine platform. With ancillary datasets, including the nighttime light data and the Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar data, we improved the performance of our previously developed algorithm in arid areas. We evaluated the GAIA data for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015, and the mean overall accuracy is higher than 90%. A cross-product comparison indicates the GAIA data are the only dataset spanning over 30 years. The temporal trend in GAIA agrees well with other datasets at the local, regional, and global scales. Our results indicate that the GAIA reached 797,076 km2 in 2018, which is 1.5 times more than that in 1990. China and the United States (US) rank among the top two in artificial impervious area, accounting for approximately 50% of the world's total in 2018. The artificial impervious area of China surpassed that of the US in 2015. By 2018, the remaining eight among the top ten countries are India, Russia, Brazil, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, and Canada. The GAIA dataset can be freely downloaded from http://data.ess.tsinghua.edu.cn.  
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  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2756  
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Author Kosicki, J.Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Anthropogenic activity expressed as ‘artificial light at night’ improves predictive density distribution in bird populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Ecological Complexity Abbreviated Journal Ecological Complexity  
  Volume 41 Issue Pages 100809  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is one of the most important anthropogenic environmental components that affects biodiversity worldwide. Despite extensive knowledge on ALAN, being a measure of human activity that directly impacts numerous aspects of animal behaviour, such as orientation and distribution, little is known about its effects on density distribution on a large spatial scale. That is why we decided to explore by means of the Species Distribution Modelling approach (SDM) how ALAN as one of 33 predictors determines farmland and forest bird species densities. In order to safeguard study results from any inconsistency caused by the chosen method, we used two approaches, i.e. the Generalised Additive Model (GAM) and the Random Forest (RF). Within each approach, we developed two models for two bird species, the Black woodpecker and the European stonechat: the first with ALAN, and the second without ALAN as an additional predictor. Having used out-of-bag procedures in the RF approach, information-theoretic criteria for the GAM, and evaluation models based on an independent dataset, we demonstrated that models with ALAN had higher predictive density power than models without it. The Black woodpecker definitely and linearly avoids anthropogenic activity, defined by the level of artificial light, while the European stonechat tolerates human activity to some degree, especially in farmland habitats. What is more, a heuristic analysis of predictive maps based on models without ALAN shows that both species reach high densities in regions where they are deemed rare. Hence, the study proves that urbanisation processes, which can be reflected by ALAN, are among key predictors necessary for developing Species Density Distribution Models for both farmland and forest bird species.  
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  ISSN 1476945X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2776  
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Author Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Anthropogenic disruption of the night sky darkness in urban and rural areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.  
  Volume 3 Issue 10 Pages 160541  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The growing emissions of artificial light to the atmosphere are producing, among other effects, a significant increase of the night sky brightness (NSB) above its expected natural values. A permanent sensor network has been deployed in Galicia (northwest of Iberian peninsula) to monitor the anthropogenic disruption of the night sky darkness in a countrywide area. The network is composed of 14 detectors integrated in automated weather stations of MeteoGalicia, the Galician public meteorological agency. Zenithal NSB readings are taken every minute and the results are openly available in real time for researchers, interested stakeholders and the public at large through a dedicated website. The measurements allow one to assess the extent of the loss of the natural night in urban, periurban, transition and dark rural sites, as well as its daily and monthly time courses. Two metrics are introduced here to characterize the disruption of the night darkness across the year: the significant magnitude (m1/3) and the moonlight modulation factor (γ). The significant magnitude shows that in clear and moonless nights the zenithal night sky in the analysed urban settings is typically 14–23 times brighter than expected from a nominal natural dark sky. This factor lies in the range 7–8 in periurban sites, 1.6–2.5 in transition regions and 0.8–1.6 in rural and mountain dark sky places. The presence of clouds in urban areas strongly enhances the amount of scattered light, easily reaching amplification factors in excess of 25, in comparison with the light scattered in the same places under clear sky conditions. The periodic NSB modulation due to the Moon, still clearly visible in transition and rural places, is barely notable at periurban locations and is practically lost at urban sites.  
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  ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1544  
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Author Miller, M.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Apparent Effects of Light Pollution on Singing Behavior of American Robins Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal Condor  
  Volume 108 Issue 1 Pages 130  
  Keywords American Robin; birds; light pollution; morning chorus; dawn chorus; song; Turdus migratorius; animals; communication  
  Abstract Astronomers consider light pollution to be a growing problem, however few studies have addressed potential effects of light pollution on wildlife. Sunlight is believed to initiate song in many bird species. If light initiates song, then light pollution may be influencing avian song behavior at a population level. This hypothesis predicts that birds breeding in areas with large amounts of artificial light will begin singing earlier in the day than birds in areas with little artificial light. Birds in highly illuminated areas might begin singing earlier than did birds in those same areas in previous years when artificial light levels were known to be, or were presumably, lower. Also, birds should begin singing earlier within a site on brightly lit nights. In 2002 and 2003 I documented initiation of morning song by breeding American Robins (Turdus migratorius) in areas with differing intensity of artificial nocturnal light. I compared my observations among sites and against historical studies. Robin populations in areas with large amounts of artificial light frequently began their morning chorus during true night. Chorus initiation time, relative to civil twilight, was positively correlated with amount of artificial light present during true night. Robin choruses in areas with little, or presumably little, artificial light have almost never begun during true night, instead appearing to track the onset of civil twilight. Proliferation of artificial nocturnal light may be strongly affecting singing behavior of American Robins at a population level.  
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  ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 39  
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Author Gibbons, R.; Terry, T.; Bhagavathula, R.; Meyer, J.; Lewis, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Applicability of mesopic factors to the driving task Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology  
  Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 70-82  
  Keywords Lighting; Public Safety; Planning  
  Abstract With the advent of light-emitting diode technology being applied to roadway lighting, the spectral power distribution of the light source is becoming much more important. In this experiment, the detection of pedestrians at five adaptation levels under three light sources, high pressure sodium and light emitting diodes of two colour temperatures was measured in realistic roadway scenarios. The results show that while the light source type was not significant, an increase in adaptation luminance increased the detection distance. As the offset of the object to the roadway increased, some spectral effects became more significant; however, this effect was not consistent across all angles of eccentricity. The conclusions from this work indicate that mesopic factors may not be applicable on high-speed roads.  
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  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1382  
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