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Author Sielachowska, M., & Zajkowski, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Assessment of Light Pollution Based on the Analysis of Luminous Flux Distribution in Sports Facilities Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Engineer of the XXI Century Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 70 Issue Pages 139-150  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract The article attempts to assess the amount of light pollution with artificial light from sports facilities. The football stadium has been analysed, while considering a few configurations that take into account different coefficients of reflection of the luminous flux for the tribunes and the object main board. Simplified model of the football stadium was introduced to the DIALux simulation software, and then computer calculations were made for selected variants. In addition, the applicable normative requirements in the field of lighting systems were discussed and the mathematical distribution of the luminous flux in the examined sports facility was presented.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2504  
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Author Li, X.; Liu, Z.; Chen, X.; Meng, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Assessment of the impact of the 2010 Haiti earthquake on human activity based on DMSP/OLS time series nighttime light data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Applied Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J. Appl. Rem. Sens.  
  Volume 13 Issue 04 Pages 1  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Earthquake disasters and postdisaster reconstruction have profound impacts on human society. We use time series nighttime light images collected by the defense meteorological satellite program-operational linescan system sensors as a proxy data source for human activities (HAs). After calibration, a time series analysis method is used to study the distribution and intensity of the changes in HAs after an earthquake. We consider the Haiti earthquake an example to analyze the HA sequence patterns and the aggregation patterns of the HA centers. The results show the following: (1) postearthquake recovery and reconstruction efforts led to increases in the long-term HAs, but the level of increased HA was usually low. (2) The level of postearthquake HAs in the most affected areas (seismic intensity zone VIII+) increased, whereas the postearthquake HAs in severely affected areas (seismic intensity zones VI and VII) were more fragmented. (3) The recovery of HAs in seismic intensity zone VIII+ (mainly Port-au-Prince) required 2 years, but the actual time may be far longer.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1931-3195 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2748  
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Author Touitou, Y.; Reinberg, A.; Touitou, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Association between light at night, melatonin secretion, sleep deprivation, and the internal clock: Health impacts and mechanisms of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume 173 Issue Pages 94-106  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Exposure to Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) results in a disruption of the circadian system, which is deleterious to health. In industrialized countries, 75% of the total workforce is estimated to have been involved in shift work and night work. Epidemiologic studies, mainly of nurses, have revealed an association between sustained night work and a 50-100% higher incidence of breast cancer. The potential and multifactorial mechanisms of the effects include the suppression of melatonin secretion by ALAN, sleep deprivation, and circadian disruption. Shift and/or night work generally decreases the time spent sleeping, and it disrupts the circadian time structure. In the long run, this desynchronization is detrimental to health, as underscored by a large number of epidemiological studies that have uncovered elevated rates of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular risks, obesity, mood disorders and age-related macular degeneration. It amounts to a public health issue in the light of the very substantial number of individuals involved. The IARC has classified shift work in group 2A of “probable carcinogens to humans” since “they involve a circadian disorganization”. Countermeasures to the effects of ALAN, such as melatonin, bright light, or psychotropic drugs, have been proposed as a means to combat circadian clock disruption and improve adaptation to shift and night work. We review the evidence for the ALAN impacts on health. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding to combat the detrimental properties of exposure to ALAN and develop strategies of prevention.  
  Address UHSA – Groupe Hospitalier Paul Guiraud, 54, avenue de la Republique, 94806 Villejuif, France  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28214594 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2455  
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Author Park, Y.-M.M.; White, A.J.; Jackson, C.L.; Weinberg, C.R.; Sandler, D.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Association of Exposure to Artificial Light at Night While Sleeping With Risk of Obesity in Women Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication JAMA Internal Medicine Abbreviated Journal JAMA Intern Med  
  Volume 179 Issue 8 Pages 1061-1071  
  Keywords Human Health; Obesity; Sleep  
  Abstract Importance: Short sleep has been associated with obesity, but to date the association between exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) while sleeping and obesity is unknown. Objective: To determine whether ALAN exposure while sleeping is associated with the prevalence and risk of obesity. Design, Setting, and Participants: This baseline and prospective analysis included women aged 35 to 74 years enrolled in the Sister Study in all 50 US states and Puerto Rico from July 2003 through March 2009. Follow-up was completed on August 14, 2015. A total of 43722 women with no history of cancer or cardiovascular disease who were not shift workers, daytime sleepers, or pregnant at baseline were included in the analysis. Data were analyzed from September 1, 2017, through December 31, 2018. Exposures: Artificial light at night while sleeping reported at enrollment, categorized as no light, small nightlight in the room, light outside the room, and light or television in the room. Main Outcomes and Measures: Prevalent obesity at baseline was based on measured general obesity (body mass index [BMI] >/=30.0) and central obesity (waist circumference [WC] >/=88 cm, waist-to-hip ratio [WHR] >/=0.85, or waist-to-height ratio [WHtR]>/=0.5). To evaluate incident overweight and obesity, self-reported BMI at enrollment was compared with self-reported BMI at follow-up (mean [SD] follow-up, 5.7 [1.0] years). Generalized log-linear models with robust error variance were used to estimate multivariable-adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and relative risks (RRs) with 95% CIs for prevalent and incident obesity. Results: Among the population of 43 722 women (mean [SD] age, 55.4 [8.9] years), having any ALAN exposure while sleeping was positively associated with a higher prevalence of obesity at baseline, as measured using BMI (PR, 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02-1.03), WC (PR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.09-1.16), WHR (PR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00-1.08), and WHtR (PR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04-1.09), after adjusting for confounding factors, with P < .001 for trend for each measure. Having any ALAN exposure while sleeping was also associated with incident obesity (RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06-1.34). Compared with no ALAN, sleeping with a television or a light on in the room was associated with gaining 5 kg or more (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.08-1.27; P < .001 for trend), a BMI increase of 10% or more (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26; P = .04 for trend), incident overweight (RR, 1.22; 95% CI,1.06-1.40; P = .03 for trend), and incident obesity (RR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13-1.57; P < .001 for trend). Results were supported by sensitivity analyses and additional multivariable analyses including potential mediators such as sleep duration and quality, diet, and physical activity. Conclusions and Relevance: These results suggest that exposure to ALAN while sleeping may be a risk factor for weight gain and development of overweight or obesity. Further prospective and interventional studies could help elucidate this association and clarify whether lowering exposure to ALAN while sleeping can promote obesity prevention.  
  Address Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2168-6106 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31180469 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2525  
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Author Marinac, C.R.; Quante, M.; Mariani, S.; Weng, J.; Redline, S.; Cespedes Feliciano, E.M.; Hipp, J.A.; Wang, D.; Kaplan, E.R.; James, P.; Mitchell, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Associations Between Timing of Meals, Physical Activity, Light Exposure, and Sleep With Body Mass Index in Free-Living Adults Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Physical Activity & Health Abbreviated Journal J Phys Act Health  
  Volume 16 Issue 3 Pages 214-221  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: This study tested if the timing of meals, physical activity, light exposure, and sleep cluster within individuals and are associated with body mass index (BMI) in a sample of free-living adults (N = 125). METHODS: Data were collected between November 2015 and March 2016 at the University of California, San Diego, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Washington University in St Louis. Height and weight were measured, and BMI (kg/m(2)) was calculated. Sleep timing was estimated using actigraphy, and timing of meals, physical activity, and light exposure were self-reported using a smartphone application. General linear models estimated the mean BMI across time categories of behaviors, adjusting for covariates. A latent class analysis was used to identify patterns of timing variables that clustered within individuals and test for associations between identified patterns and BMI. RESULTS: Later exposure to outdoor light was associated with a lower BMI (P trend < .01). The timing of other behaviors was not independently associated with BMI. The latent class analysis identified 2 distinct groups related to behavioral timing, reflecting an “early bird” and “night owl” phenotype. These phenotypes were not associated with BMI (P > .05). CONCLUSION: Timing of exposures to light, meals, sleep, and physical activity were not strongly associated with BMI in this sample.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1543-3080 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30798690 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2241  
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