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Author Benfield, J.A.; Nutt, R.J.; Taff, B.D.; Miller, Z.D.; Costigan, H.; Newman, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A laboratory study of the psychological impact of light pollution in National Parks Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology  
  Volume 57 Issue Pages 67-72  
  Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Psychology  
  Abstract Light pollution is ubiquitous in much of the developed and developing world, including rural and wilderness areas. Other sources of pollution, such as noise or motorized vehicle emissions, are known to impact the perceived quality of natural settings as well as the psychological well-being and satisfaction of visitors to those locations, but the effects of light pollution on visitors to natural settings is largely unstudied. Using experimental manipulations of light pollution levels in virtual reality simulations of three U.S. National Parks, the current study aimed to provide initial evidence of an effect on visitors. Results show that light pollution impacts a range of psychological and scene evaluation dimensions but that pristine night skies are not necessarily viewed as the ideal, likely due to being viewed as unfamiliar or unrealistic because so few have experienced the true baseline.  
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  ISSN 0272-4944 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1941  
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Author Roberts, T.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A Lapland Longspur Tragedy: Being an Account of a Great Destruction of These Birds during a Storm in Southwestern Minnesota and Northwestern Iowa in March, 1904 Type Journal Article
  Year 1907 Publication The Auk Abbreviated Journal The Auk  
  Volume 24 Issue 4 Pages 369-377  
  Keywords Animals  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-8038 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2417  
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Author Zhang, D.; Jones, R.R.; Powell-Wiley, T.M.; Jia, P.; James, P.; Xiao, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A large prospective investigation of outdoor light at night and obesity in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Health : a Global Access Science Source Abbreviated Journal Environ Health  
  Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 74  
  Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing; Circadian rhythms; Light at night; Light pollution; Obesity  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Research has suggested that artificial light at night (LAN) may disrupt circadian rhythms, sleep, and contribute to the development of obesity. However, almost all previous studies are cross-sectional, thus, there is a need for prospective investigations of the association between LAN and obesity risk. The goal of our current study was to examine the association between baseline LAN and the development of obesity over follow-up in a large cohort of American adults. METHODS: The study included a sample of 239,781 men and women (aged 50-71) from the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study who were not obese at baseline (1995-1996). We used multiple logistic regression to examine whether LAN at baseline was associated with the odds of developing obesity at follow-up (2004-2006). Outdoor LAN exposure was estimated from satellite imagery and obesity was measured based on self-reported weight and height. RESULTS: We found that higher outdoor LAN at baseline was associated with higher odds of developing obesity over 10 years. Compared with the lowest quintile of LAN, the highest quintile was associated with 12% and 19% higher odds of developing obesity at follow-up in men (OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.00, 1.250)) and women (1.19 (1.04, 1.36)), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that high LAN exposure could predict a higher risk of developing obesity in middle-to-older aged American adults.  
  Address Department of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health, Houston, TX, USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1476-069X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32611430; PMCID:PMC7329409 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3029  
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Author Li, C.; Li, G.; Zhu, Y.; Ge, Y.; Kung, H.-te; Wu, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A likelihood-based spatial statistical transformation model (LBSSTM) of regional economic development using DMSP/OLS time series and nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Spatial Statistics Abbreviated Journal Spatial Statistics  
  Volume 21 Issue B Pages 421-439  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract In a regional economy, the central city of a metropolitan area has a radiative effect and an accumulative effect on its surrounding cities. Considering the limitations of traditional data sources (e.g., its subjectivity) and the advantages of nighttime light data, including its objectivity, availability and cyclicity, this paper proposes a likelihood spatial statistical transformation model (LBSSTM) to invert for the gross domestic product (GDP) of the surrounding cities, using time series of Sum of Lights (SOL) data covering the central city and taking advantage of the economic and spatial association between the central city and the surrounding cities within a metropolitan area and the correlation between SOL and GDP. The Wuhan Metropolitan Area is chosen to verify the model using time series analysis and exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA). The experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed LBSSTM. The prediction accuracy of our model is verified by cross-validation using data from 1998, 2004 and 2011, based on the 3σ rule. This model can quantitatively express the agglomeration and diffusion effect of the central city and reveal the spatial pattern of this effect. The results of this work are potentially useful in making spatio-temporal economic projections and filling in missing data from some regions, as well as gaining a deeper quantitative and spatio-temporal understanding of the laws underlying regional economic development.  
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  ISSN 2211-6753 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1644  
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Author Falchi, F.; Bará, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) A linear systems approach to protect the night sky: implications for current and future regulations Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal R. Soc. open sci.  
  Volume 7 Issue 12 Pages 201501  
  Keywords Skyglow; Regulation; Lighting  
  Abstract The persistent increase of artificial light emissions is causing a progressive brightening of the night sky in most regions of the world. This process is a threat for the long-term sustainability of the scientific and educational activity of ground-based astronomical observatories operating in the optical range. Huge investments in building, scientific and technical workforce, equipment and maintenance can be at risk if the increasing light pollution levels hinder the capability of carrying out the top-level scientific observations for which these key scientific infrastructures were built. Light pollution has other negative consequences, as e.g. biodiversity endangering and the loss of the starry sky for recreational, touristic and preservation of cultural heritage. The traditional light pollution mitigation approach is based on imposing conditions on the photometry of individual sources, but the aggregated effects of all sources in the territory surrounding the observatories are seldom addressed in the regulations. We propose that this approach shall be complemented with a top-down, ambient artificial skyglow immission limits strategy, whereby clear limits are established to the admissible deterioration of the night sky above the observatories. We describe the general form of the indicators that can be employed to this end, and develop linear models relating their values to the artificial emissions across the territory. This approach can be easily applied to other protection needs, like e.g. to protect nocturnal ecosystems, and it is expected to be useful for making informed decisions on public lighting, in the context of wider spatial planning projects.  
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  ISSN 2054-5703 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3260  
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