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Author Nam, S.; Park, S.-E.; Shin, H.-C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Accessing the economic value of night view of bridge using contingent valuation method: the case of South Korea's Han-River bridge Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research Abbreviated Journal Int. J. of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Res.  
  Volume 9 Issue 3 Pages 360-370  
  Keywords Economics; South Korea; Korea; Han River Bridge; contingent valuation method; Viewshed analysis; Seoul  
  Abstract Purpose

The purpose of this study is to estimate an individual’s probability of preservation the night view of Han-River Bridge at tax using the CVM; and to present the effects of 4Es on experience economy theory.

Design/methodology/approach

The on-site survey was conducted in the 11 district Han-river parks; Gwangnaru, Jamsil, Ttukseom, Jamwon, Banpo, Yeechon, Yeouido, Mangwon, Nanji, Ganseo and Yanghwa district including 24 bridge ssuch as Banpo, Olympic Bridge during the 8-9pm around the lighting and 9-10pm peak time of lighting.

Findings

Truncated mean WTP indicates that the economic value of the night view of Han-River Bridge is 49,575 won (about U.S. $50) per household, which implies the significance of the preservation value of the night view.

Research limitations/implications

This study sets a hypothetical market and there are limitations on hypothetical bias of the DC CVM. For the future study, a survey with a specific real payment vehicle in an attempt to reduce hypothetical bias can be a tool for the prevention of the overestimation.

Practical implications

Through the study, Seoul city has to invest aggressively on the night view landscape business of Han River bridge, which can become a landmark and lots of attraction effect of tourists. Since this study’s core aim was to justify the economic value of the night-view of the Han-River bridges, the estimated amount strongly supports the lighting business of the Han-River bridge.

Originality/value

The results of this research may help policy makers of Han-River to establish practical decision whether improving and preserving the Han-River’s night view lighting business are worth the value.
 
  Address Kyunghee University, Seoul, South Korea  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Emerald Group Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1750-6182 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1216  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pauwels, J.; Le Viol, I.; Azam, C.; Valet, N.; Julien, J.-F.; Bas, Y.; Lemarchand, C.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kerbiriou, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Accounting for artificial light impact on bat activity for a biodiversity-friendly urban planning Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning  
  Volume 183 Issue Pages 12-25  
  Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Light pollution constitutes a major threat to biodiversity by decreasing habitat quality and landscape connectivity for nocturnal species. While there is an increasing consideration of biodiversity in urban management policies, the impact of artificial light is poorly accounted for. This is in a large part due to the lack of quantitative information and relevant guidelines to limit its negative effects. Here we compared the potential of two sources of information on light pollution, remote sensing (nocturnal picture taken from the International Space Station ISS) and ground-based (location of streetlights) data, to measure its impact on bats. Our aims were to (i) evaluate how light pollution affected Pipistrellus pipistrellus activity at the city scale, (ii) determine which source of information was the most relevant to measure light pollution’s effect and (iii) define a reproducible methodology applicable in land management to account for biodiversity in lighting planning. We used citizen science data to model the activity of P. pipistrellus, a species considered light tolerant, within three cities of France while accounting for artificial light through a variable based on either source of information. We showed that at the city scale, P. pipistrellus activity is negatively impacted by light pollution irrespective of the light variable used. This detrimental effect was better described by variables based on ISS pictures than on streetlights location. Our methodology can be easily reproduced and used in urban planning to help take the impact of light pollution into consideration and promote a biodiversity-friendly management of artificial light.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2118  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brandt, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Accuracy of satellite-derived estimates of flaring volume for offshore oil and gas operations in nine countries Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 2 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Flaring of natural gas contributes to climate change and wastes a potentially valuable energy resource. Various groups have estimated flaring volumes via remote sensing by nighttime detection of flares using multi-spectral imaging. However, only limited efforts have been made to independently assess the accuracy of these estimation methods. I analyze the accuracy of the VIIRS Nightfire published flare detection results, comparing yearly estimated flaring rates to reported flaring data from governments in 9 countries(Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Mexico, Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, USA, UK) and 7 years(2012–2018 inclusive). We analyze only flares occurring at offshore oil and gas production platforms and floating production units. A total of 1054 flare volume estimates were compared to volumes reported to government agencies. 80.8% of flare estimates lie within 0.5 orders of magnitude (OM) of reported volumes, which 93.7% fall within 1 OM of the reported volume. Little systematic bias is found except in the smallest size classes(<106 m3 y−1 ). Relative error ratios are larger for smaller flares. No significant trend was observed across years, and variation by country is in line with that expected by size distribution of flares by country. Wide aggregate estimates for groups of flares will exhibit little bias and dispersion, with the sum of 1000 flares having an expected interquartile range of −6% to +3% of actual reported volumes. Social media blurb: Test of remote sensing for flare detection shows accuracy across 9 countries and 8 years.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2958  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hannibal, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Action of Light on the Neuroendocrine Axis Type Book Chapter
  Year 2021 Publication Neuroendocrine Clocks and Calendars Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health; Photoentrainment; circadian rhythm; Neuroendocrine Axis; neuroendocrine system; hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis; hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis; artificial light at night  
  Abstract Photoentrainment of the circadian clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is fundamental for the stable regulation of neuroendocrine function underlying physiological functions such as metabolism, sleep, immune responses, and reproduction. Masking by light directly suppresses melatonin secretion independent of the circadian system, with impact on several neuroendocrine axes. This chapter describes recent findings in anatomy and physiology on how light mediates its effects on SCN-regulated timing of the neuroendocrine system, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and melatonin and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) secretion. In modern societies, artificial light at night (ALAN) seems to affect circadian and neuroendocrine systems, and should be considered in the understanding the health problems of the industrialized human population.  
  Address Department of Clinical Biochemistry Bispebjerg Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; j.hannibal ( at ) dadlnet.dk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Ebling F.J.P., Piggins H.D. Series Title Masterclass in Neuroendocrinology Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume 10 Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3411  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eriksen, A.; Wabakken, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Activity patterns at the Arctic Circle: nocturnal eagle owls and interspecific interactions during continuous midsummer daylight Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol  
  Volume 49 Issue 7 Pages e01781  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Circadian rhythms result from adaptations to biotic and abiotic environmental conditions that cycle through the day, such as light, temperature, or temporal overlap between interacting species. At high latitudes, close to or beyond the polar circles, uninterrupted midsummer daylight may pose a challenge to the circadian rhythms of otherwise nocturnal species, such as eagle owls Bubo bubo. By non‐invasive field methods, we studied eagle owl activity in light of their interactions with their main prey the water vole Arvicola amphibius, and their competitor the white‐tailed eagle Haliaeetus albicilla during continuous midsummer daylight on open, treeless islands in coastal Northern Norway. We evaluated circadian rhythms, temporal overlap, exposure, and spatial distribution. The owls maintained a nocturnal activity pattern, possibly because slightly dimmer light around midnight offered favourable hunting conditions. The eagles were active throughout the 24‐hour period as opposed to the strictly diurnal rhythm reported elsewhere, thus increasing temporal overlap and the potential for interference competition between the two avian predators. This may indicate an asymmetry, with the owls facing the highest cost of interference competition. The presence of eagles combined with constant daylight in this open landscape may make the owls vulnerable to interspecific aggression, and contrary to the available literature, eagle owls rarely exposed themselves visually during territorial calls, possibly to avoid detection by eagles. We found indications of spatial segregation between owls and eagles reflecting differences in main prey, possibly in combination with habitat‐mediated avoidance. Eagle owl vocal activity peaked in the evening before a nocturnal peak in visual observations, when owls were active hunting, consistent with the hypothesis of a dusk chorus in nocturnal bird species. The owls may have had to trade‐off between calling and foraging during the few hours around midnight when slightly dimmer light reduced the detection risk while also providing better hunting conditions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1881  
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