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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K. M., & Schieck, A. F.
Title Designing digital displays and interactive media in today’s cities by night. Do we know enough about attracting attention to do so? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Conscious Cities Anthology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Commentary; Lighting
Abstract With the huge transformation in the development of digital screen technology and its consistently decreasing cost, digital billboards are progressively replacing traditional static, two-dimensional poster advertisements in our cities1. Previously, due to the substantial expenditure involved, they were only available to major international brands with vast promotional resources to build their brand fame. Today, however, they are being used increasingly by advertisers to deliver all kinds of messages from simple ones to more sophisticated, interactive storytelling. Soon, however, even newer ways of purchasing advertisements using computers will be introduced by the outdoor media industry to address the public, so potentially everybody will be able to rent out available advertising space and communicate the message. But are we ready for this next step? As there are no proper guidelines or regulations in place for this new medium in the urban realm, today we are facing issues such as no integration of the display’s location into the built environment, no specifications based on knowledge of human perception and the human centric design approach, no control over its content quality, and so called ‘display blindness’2 seems to be a common collective urban experience at night. Taking London as one of the most cutting-edge outdoor digital advertising environments in the world3 (with the largest number of these screens traditionally located in or in close proximity to Piccadilly Circus) this paper discusses various aspects of this new medium. Besides the layout and geometry of the space, it also focuses on navigation and attracting the visual attention of passers-by at night in a practical human oriented context. Additionally, questions regarding complex sensory, social, special and interactional issues and the necessity for interdisciplinary collaboration have been addressed.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2351
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Author Deng, J., Che, T., Xiao, C., Wang, S., Dai, L., & Meerzhan, A.
Title Suitability Analysis of Ski Areas in China: An Integrated Study Based on Natural and Socioeconomic Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Cryosphere Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The successful bidding of the 2022 Winter Olympics (Beijing 2022, officially known as the XXIV Olympic Winter Games) has greatly stimulated Chinese enthusiasm to participate in winter sports. Consequently, the Chinese ski industry is rapidly booming driven by enormous market demand and government support. However, investing in ski area at an unreasonable location will cause problems both from economic perspective (in terms of operation and management) as well as geographical concerns (such as environmental degradation). To evaluate the suitability of a ski area based on scientific 20 metrics has since become a prerequisite to the sustainable development of ski industry. In this study, we evaluate the locational suitability of ski areas in China by integrating their natural and socioeconomic conditions using linear weighted method based

on geographic information systems (GIS) spatial analysis combined with remote sensing, online and field survey data. Key indexes for evaluating the natural suitability include snow cover, air temperature, topographic conditions, groundwater, and vegetation, whereas socioeconomic suitability is evaluated based on economic conditions, accessibility of transportation, 25 distance to tourist attractions, and distance to cities. As such, an integrated metrics considering both natural and socioeconomic suitability is defined to be a threshold and used to identify the suitability of a candidate region for ski area development. The

results show that 92% of existing ski areas are located in areas with an integrated index greater than 0.5. In contrary, a ski area is considered to be a dismal prospect when the locational integrated index is less than 0.5. Finally, corresponding development strategies for decision-makers are proposed based on the multi-criteria metrics, which will be extended to incorporate potential

30 influences from future climate change and socioeconomic development.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2522
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Author Wicht, M.; Kuffer, M.
Title The continuous built-up area extracted from ISS night-time lights to compare the amount of urban green areas across European cities Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication European Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal European Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The presence of urban green areas significantly impacts urban inhabitants’ well-being. However, comparative studies across European cities are constraint by urban administrative boundaries, which commonly do not match the continuous built-up urban area. This makes comparative research on environmental indicators very problematic, as administrative boundaries are not usually appropriate to define the urban human environment. Therefore, this study aimis to explore the use of night-time light (NTL) images of the International Space Station (ISS) to delineate the continuous built-up area (CBA) of selected European cities to calculate the urban green area share per alternatively derived city extent. The result of the CBA shows that NTL images provide a robust data source to make the urban extent of European cities comparable. By comparing results of different datasets on green areas, we discuss the limitations of existing indicators and opportunities for new ones. Results show that green areas are rarely in close proximity to human living environment, even though the share of urban green areas within the CBA might be larger, as in comparison to the administrative boundary. We conclude that ISS NTL imagery is very suitable for mapping the CBA when aiming at comparability of environmental indicators across cities.
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ISSN 2279-7254 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2506
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Author Davoudian, N.
Title Background lighting clutters: how do they affect visual saliency of urban objects? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation
Volume 5 Issue 1-2 Pages 95-103
Keywords Vision
Abstract The current study aims to create some general guidance for designers to better understand the impact of background lighting in their design and as a result minimize its effect on the visual saliency of urban objects. There are few studies about how lighting clutters can affect and decrease the visual saliency of illuminated urban objects at night. Lack of information in this area has resulted in increasing luminance to be recognized as one of the main tools to enhance the saliency of urban objects at night. To address this matter a study was performed to investigate the effect of proximity of lighting clutters on visual saliency of urban objects. A forced choice pair comparison method was employed, in which two test images of an urban object in different conditions of luminance contrast and proximity of light patterns were compared. Test participants reported in which image the target appeared more salient. Results show there is a progressive increase in saliency value by increasing the gap between the target and the background lighting when the luminance contrast of the target is three or higher. However, the critical area around the object with the highest effect lies between 0.5° and 1° visual angle. Removing light patterns beyond that point creates negligible effect. The findings of this study could inform development of future models of visual recognition in the road environment, models which can address the important effects of environmental context in addition to photometric variables (luminance and contrast) that are the only factors considered in traditional models of ‘Visibility Level.’
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ISSN 2165-0349 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2527
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Author Stone, T.
Title Light Pollution: A Case Study in Framing an Environmental Problem Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ethics, Policy & Environment Abbreviated Journal Ethics, Policy & Environment
Volume 20 Issue 3 Pages 279-293
Keywords Society
Abstract Light pollution is a topic gaining importance and acceptance in environmental discourse. This concept provides a framework for categorizing the adverse effects of nighttime lighting, which advocacy groups and regulatory efforts are increasingly utilizing. However, the ethical significance of the concept has, thus far, received little critical reflection. In this paper, I analyze the moral implications of framing issues in nighttime lighting via the concept of light pollution. First, the moral and political importance of problem framing is discussed. Next, the origins and contemporary understandings of light pollution are presented. Finally, the normative limitations and practical ambiguities of light pollution are discussed, with the aim of strengthening the framework through which decisions about urban nighttime lighting strategies are increasingly approached.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2155-0085 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2226
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