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Author Kerbiriou, C.; Barré, K.; Mariton, L.; Pauwels, J.; Zissis, G.; Robert, A.; Le Viol, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Switching LPS to LED Streetlight May Dramatically Reduce Activity and Foraging of Bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Diversity Abbreviated Journal Diversity  
  Volume 12 Issue 4 Pages 165  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night is considered a major threat to biodiversity, especially for nocturnal species, as it reduces habitat availability, quality, and functionality. Since the recent evolution in light technologies in improving luminous efficacy, developed countries are experiencing a renewal of their lighting equipment that reaches its end-of-life, from conventional lighting technologies to light emitting diodes (LEDs). Despite potential cascading impacts of such a shift on nocturnal fauna, few studies have so far dealt with the impact of the renewal of street lighting by new technologies. Specifically, only one study, by Rowse et al.2016, examined the effects of switching from widely used low pressure sodium (LPS) lamps to LEDs, using bats as biological models. This study was based on a before-after-control-impact paired design (BACIP) at 12 pairs in the UK, each including one control and one experimental streetlight. If Rowse et al. 2016 showed no effect of switching to LEDs streetlights on bat activity, the effects of respective changes in light intensity and spectrum were not disentangled when testing switch effects. Here, we conduct a retrospective analysis of their data to include these covariates in statistical models with the aim of disentangling the relative effects of these light characteristics. Our re-analysis clearly indicates that the switches in spectrum and in intensity with replacement of LPS with LED lamps have significant additive and interactive effects, on bat activity. We also show that bat activity and buzz ratio decrease with increasing LED intensity while an opposite effect is observed with LPS lamps. Hence, the loss or the gain in bat activity when lamp types, i.e., spectrum, are switched strongly depends on the initial and new lamp intensities. Our results stress the need to consider simultaneously the effects of changes in the different lights characteristics when street lighting changes. Because switches from LPS to LED lamps can lead to an increase in light intensity, such technological changes may involve a reduction of bat activity in numerous cases, especially at high LED intensities. Since we are currently at an important crossroad in lighting management, we recommend to limit LED intensity and improve its spectral composition toward warmer colors to limit potential deleterious impacts on bat activity.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-2818 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2892  
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Author Barentine, J. url  openurl
  Title Who speaks for the night? The regulation of light pollution in the ‘Rights of Nature’ legal framework Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Sustainable Lighting Abbreviated Journal IJSL  
  Volume 22 Issue 2 Pages 28-36  
  Keywords Society; Law; Rights of Nature  
  Abstract Efforts to control artificial light at night (ALAN) through public policies began in the late 1950s, yet light pollution continues to grow at a global average rate roughly twice that of population growth. The current global ALAN regulatory regime is clearly inadequate to solve the problem, and achieving meaningful light pollution reductions requires a new approach. This paper reviews the legal status quo, introduces the “Rights of Nature” doctrine, and advances the idea of nighttime darkness as a natural characteristic of sufficient inherent value to merit legal consideration in the Rights of Nature context. It concludes with a series of recommendations for ways forward, including the recognition of the intrinsic value of dark skies in the preambulatory language of legislation, formulating new policies in anticipation of broad adoption of Rights of Nature statutes, and advancing the significance of natural nighttime darkness in case law arguments.  
  Address International Dark-Sky Association, 5049 E Broadway Blvd, Suite 105 Tucson, AZ 85711-3646 USA; john ( at ) darksky ( dot ) org  
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  Publisher IJSL Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2586-1247 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3258  
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Author Sung, C. Y., & Kim, Y.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Analysis of the Status of Light Pollution and its Potential Effect on Ecosystem of the Deogyusan National Park Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Korean Journal of Environment and Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 34 Issue 1 Pages 63-71  
  Keywords Conservation; Ecology; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This study characterized the spatial and seasonal patterns of light pollution in the Deogyusan National Park and examined the potential effects of light pollution on ecosystems in the park using light intensities derived from VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) DNB (Day and Night Band) nightlight images collected in January and August 2018. Results showed that the Muju Deogyusan resort had the greatest light intensity than other sources of light pollution in the park, and light intensity of the resort was much higher in January than in August, suggesting that artificial lights in ski slopes and facilities were the major source of light pollution in the park. An analysis of an urban-natural light pollution gradient along a neighboring urban area through the inside of the park indicated that light radiated from a light pollution source permeated for up to 1km into the adjacent area and contaminated the edge area of the park. Of the legally protected species whose distributions were reported in literature, four mammals (Martes flavigula, Mustela nivalis, Prionailurus bengalensis, Pteromys volans aluco), two birds (Falco subbuteo, Falco tinnunculus), and nine amphibians and reptiles (Onychodactylus koreanus, Hynobius leechii, Karsenia koreana, Rana dybowskii, Rana huanrenensis, Elaphe dione, Rhabdophis tigrinus, Gloydius ussuriensis, Gloydius saxatilis) inhabited light-polluted areas. Of those species inhabiting light-polluted areas, nocturnal species, such as Prionailurus bengalensis and Pteromys volans aluco, in particular, were vulnerable to light pollution. These results implied that protecting ecosystems from light pollution in national parks requires managing nighttime light in the parks and surrounding areas and making a plan to manage nighttime light pollution by taking into account ecological characteristics of wild animals in the parks.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2948  
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Author Nam, K. H., Kim, C. H., & Nam, K. H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Research on the Improvement of Visibility Using Low Deck Lighting in Bad Weather Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Korean Institute of Electrical and Electronic Material Engineers Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 33 Issue 3 Pages 186-193  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract We investigate a fog-detection CCT control system using low deck lighting as a solution to the forward visibility of pole-type street lamps employed on existing roads. The lighting standards were met with a light source that has less compared with those of pole-type street lamps. The results show that the transmission rate was increased by changing the color temperature by automatically recognizing fog in bad weather and minimizing the phenomenon of lighting. In addition, it was allowed to create a safer and more comfortable driving environment for drivers owing to flicker or light pollution of existing pole-type street lamps. As a result, if lighting is used at a lower level than pole-type street lamps, the accident rate caused by securing the driver's forward visibility can be reduced sharply and existing problems can be resolved.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2953  
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Author Percival, D. url  openurl
  Title Street Furniture in Town and Countryside Type Journal Article
  Year 1958 Publication Official Architecture and Planning Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 570-573  
  Keywords Lighting; Design  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2432  
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