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Author Wang, J., Zhang, J., Gong, L., Li, Q., Zhou, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Seismic Indirect Economic Loss Assessment and Recovery Evaluation Using Night-time Light Images – Application for Wenchuan Earthquake Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics  
  Abstract Seismic indirect economic loss not only has a major impact on regional economic recovery policies, but also related to the economic assistance at the national level. Due to the Cross-regional economic activities and the difficulty of obtaining data, it's difficult that the indirect economic loss survey covers all economic activities. However, night-time light in an area can reflect the economic activity of the region. This paper focuses on the indirect economic losses caused by the Wenchuan earthquake in 2008 and evaluated the progress of restoration and reconstruction based on night-time light Images. First, the functional relationship between GDP and night-time light parameters was established based on the pre-earthquake data. Next, the indirect loss of the earthquake was evaluated by the night-time light attenuation in the disaster area after the earthquake. Then, the capacity recovery, which is characterized by the brightness recovery process of the light area, was evaluated. Lastly, the process of light expansion in the disaster area was analyzed to evaluate the economic expansion speed and efficiency.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2064  
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Author Ahmed M. A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Avoiding room light during night may stimulate immunity in COVID-19 patients by promoting melatonin production Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Melatonin Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 476-481  
  Keywords Human Health; Commentary  
  Abstract COVID-19 is one of the greatest health issues facing humankind for many decades; it emerged in Wuhan, China, late in December 2019, and rapidly spread over the world within the short period. This report emphasizes the potential hazards of exposure to room light at night which affects the immunity of COVID-19 patients by suppressing their melatonin, which is only released from the pineal gland at night. Exposure to light at night is especially common in the hospital setting. This may make the symptom worse for the hospitalized patients and the light at night should not be ignored. Thus, I suggest that COVID-19 patients should avoid light at night either by wearing eye masks or darkening the room to enhance pineal melatonin synthesis and increase their serum melatonin levels.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3204  
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Author Gagliardi, G.; Lupia, M.; Cario, G.; Tedesco, F.; Cicchello Gaccio, F.; Lo Scudo, F.; Casavola, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Advanced Adaptive Street Lighting Systems for Smart Cities Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Smart Cities Abbreviated Journal Smart Cities  
  Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 1495-1512  
  Keywords Lighting; Energy  
  Abstract This paper reports the results of a recently concluded R&D project, SCALS (Smart Cities Adaptive Lighting System), which aimed at the development of all hardware/software components of an adaptive urban smart lighting architecture allowing municipalities to manage and control public street lighting lamps. The system is capable to autonomously adjust street lamps’ brightness on the basis of the presence of vehicles (busses/trucks, cars, motorcycles and bikes) and/or pedestrians in specific areas or segments of the streets/roads of interest to reduce the energy consumption. The main contribution of this work is to design a low cost smart lighting system and, at same time, to define an IoT infrastructure where each lighting pole is an element of a network that can increase their amplitude. More generally, the proposed smart infrastructure can be viewed as the basis of a wider technological architecture aimed at offering value-added services for sustainable cities. The smart architecture combines various sub-systems (local controllers, motion sensors, video-cameras, weather sensors) and electronic devices, each of them in charge of performing specific operations: remote street segments lamp management, single street lamp brightness control, video processing for vehicles motion detection and classification, wireless and wired data exchanges, power consumptions analysis and traffic evaluation. Two pilot sites have been built up in the project where the smart architecture has been tested and validated in real scenarios. Experimental results show that energy savings of up to 80% are possible compared to a traditional street lamp system.  
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  ISSN 2624-6511 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3274  
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Author Aulsebrook, A.E.; Johnsson, R.D.; Lesku, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light, Sleep and Performance in Diurnal Birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 115-131  
  Keywords Review; Animals  
  Abstract Sleep has a multitude of benefits and is generally considered necessary for optimal performance. Disruption of sleep by extended photoperiods, moonlight and artificial light could therefore impair performance in humans and non-human animals alike. Here, we review the evidence for effects of light on sleep and subsequent performance in birds. There is accumulating evidence that exposure to natural and artificial sources of light regulates and suppresses sleep in diurnal birds. Sleep also benefits avian cognitive performance, including during early development. Nevertheless, multiple studies suggest that light can prolong wakefulness in birds without impairing performance. Although there is still limited research on this topic, these results raise intriguing questions about the adaptive value of sleep. Further research into the links between light, sleep and performance, including the underlying mechanisms and consequences for fitness, could shed new light on sleep evolution and urban ecology.  
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  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3328  
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Author Höhn, C.; Schmid, S.R.; Plamberger, C.P.; Bothe, K.; Angerer, M.; Gruber, G.; Pletzer, B.; Hoedlmoser, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Preliminary Results: The Impact of Smartphone Use and Short-Wavelength Light during the Evening on Circadian Rhythm, Sleep and Alertness Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 66-86  
  Keywords Human health  
  Abstract Smartphone usage strongly increased in the last decade, especially before bedtime. There is growing evidence that short-wavelength light affects hormonal secretion, thermoregulation, sleep and alertness. Whether blue light filters can attenuate these negative effects is still not clear. Therefore, here, we present preliminary data of 14 male participants (21.93 ± 2.17 years), who spent three nights in the sleep laboratory, reading 90 min either on a smartphone (1) with or (2) without a blue light filter, or (3) on printed material before bedtime. Subjective sleepiness was decreased during reading on a smartphone, but no effects were present on evening objective alertness in a GO/NOGO task. Cortisol was elevated in the morning after reading on the smartphone without a filter, which resulted in a reduced cortisol awakening response. Evening melatonin and nightly vasodilation (i.e., distal-proximal skin temperature gradient) were increased after reading on printed material. Early slow wave sleep/activity and objective alertness in the morning were only reduced after reading without a filter. These results indicate that short-wavelength light affects not only circadian rhythm and evening sleepiness but causes further effects on sleep physiology and alertness in the morning. Using a blue light filter in the evening partially reduces these negative effects.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3295  
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