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Author BjÖRnberg, T.K.S.; Wilbur, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Copepod Phototaxis And Vertical Migration Influenced By Xanthene Dyes Type Journal Article
  Year 1968 Publication The Biological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal The Biological Bulletin  
  Volume 134 Issue 3 Pages 398-410  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract 1. Phototaxis of the copepods Paracalanus crassirostris, Calanopia americana, and Acartia lillijeborgi has been measured by determining the percentage of a population moving toward or away from a point source of light per unit time. Quantitative differences in positive phototaxis were found between the species. Photopositive responses differed during the day and night in Acartia but not in Paracalanus and Calanopia.

2. Rhodamine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) brought about the following effects: (a) Locomotor activity was reversibly inhibited in all species. (b) Photopositive responses were increased in Calanopia and Acartia but decreased in Paracalanus. (c) The difference between day and night responses to a point source of light was abolished in Acartia and induced in Calanopia. (d) Somersaulting was induced in Paracalanus but not in the other species.

3. Pyronine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) also decreased locomotor activity. Fluorescein sodium (1.1 x 10-5 M and 1.1 x 10-4 M) was without significant effect.

4. Paracalanus, Calanopia, and Acartia exhibited characteristically distinct diurnal migratory cycles in vertical cylinders, which correlated well with behavior in natural waters. Calanopia and Acartia migrated to the bottom in the daylight whereas Paracalanus and young forms of Acartia were widely distributed vertically during daylight. Specimens of Calanopia and Acartia kept in the dark did not migrate.

5. The effects of rhodamine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) on vertical migration depended upon species, developmental stage, and time of day. In general, rhodamine increased the concentration of animals at the surface at night and at the bottom in daylight. Fluorescein sodium (1.1 x 10-5 M and 1.1 x 10-4 M) had little effect on vertical migration.

6. The effectiveness of rhodamine B and pyronine B is probably related to the presence of diethylamine groups lacking in fluorescein.
 
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3185 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2469  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime Ecology: The “Nocturnal Problem” Revisited Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The American Naturalist Abbreviated Journal The American Naturalist  
  Volume 193 Issue 4 Pages  
  Keywords Ecology; activity; diel; ecosystems; macroecology; nighttime; nocturnal; time partitioning  
  Abstract The existence of a synthetic program of research on what was then termed the “nocturnal problem” and that we might now call “nighttime ecology” was declared more than 70 years ago. In reality, this failed to materialize, arguably as a consequence of practical challenges in studying organisms at night and instead concentrating on the existence of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms that give rise to them, and their consequences. This legacy is evident to this day, with consideration of the ecology of the nighttime markedly underrepresented in ecological research and literature. However, several factors suggest that it would be timely to revive the vision of a comprehensive research program in nighttime ecology. These include (i) that the study of the ecology of the night is being revolutionized by new and improved technologies; (ii) suggestions that, far from being a minor component of biodiversity, a high proportion of animal species are active at night; (iii) that fundamental questions about differences and connections between the ecology of the daytime and the nighttime remain largely unanswered; and (iv) that the nighttime environment is coming under severe anthropogenic pressure. In this article, I seek to reestablish nighttime ecology as a synthetic program of research, highlighting key focal topics and questions and providing an overview of the current state of understanding and developments.  
  Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, United Kingdom; and Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study, Wallotstrasse 19, 14193 Berlin, Germany; k.j.gaston(at)exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher University of Chicago Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0147 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2254  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Langbehn, T.; Aksnes, D.; Kaartvedt, S.; Fiksen, Ø.; Jørgensen, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light comfort zone in a mesopelagic fish emerges from adaptive behaviour along a latitudinal gradient Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 623 Issue Pages 161-174  
  Keywords Animals; Moonlight  
  Abstract Throughout the oceans, small fish and other micronekton migrate between daytimedepths of several hundred meters and near-surface waters at night. These diel vertical migrationsof mesopelagic organisms structure pelagic ecosystems through trophic interactions, and are akey element in the biological carbon pump. However, depth distributions and migration ampli-tude vary greatly. Suggested proximate causes of the migration such as oxygen, temperature, andlight often correlate and therefore the causal underpinnings have remained unclear. Using meso-pelagic fishes and the Norwegian Sea as a study system, we developed a dynamic state variablemodel that finds optimal migration patterns that we validate with acoustic observations along alatitudinal gradient. The model describes predation risk and bioenergetics, and maximizes ex -pected energy surplus, a proxy for Darwinian fitness. The model allows us to disentangle the driv-ers of migration and make predictions about depth distribution and related fitness consequencesalong a latitudinal trajectory with strong gradients in environmental drivers and vertical distribu-tion of scattering layers. We show that the model-predicted vertical migration of mesopelagicfishes matches that observed along this transect. For most situations, modelled mesopelagic fishbehaviour can be well described by a light comfort zone near identical to that derived from obser-vations. By selectively keeping light or temperature constant, the model reveals that temperature,in comparison with light, has little effect on depth distribution. We find that water clarity, whichlimits how deeply light can penetrate into the ocean, structures daytime depths, while surfacelight at night controlled the depth of nocturnal ascents.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2598  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maggi, E.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Trophic compensation stabilizes marine primary producers exposed to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 606 Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Plants; Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread phenomenon along coastal areas. Despite increasing evidence of pervasive effects of ALAN on patterns of species distribution and abundance, the potential of this emerging threat to alter ecological processes in marine ecosystems has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show how exposure to white LED lighting, comparable to that experienced along local urbanized coasts, significantly enhanced the impact of grazing gastropods on epilithic microphytobenthos (MPB). ALAN increased both the photosynthetic biomass of MPB and the grazing pressure of gastropods, such that consumers compensated for the positive effect of night lighting on primary producers. Our results indicate that trophic interactions can provide a stabilizing compensatory mechanism against ALAN effects in natural food webs.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2063  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ruan, Y.L.; Zou, Y.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Monitoring The Spatio-Temporal Trajectory Of Urban Area Hotspots In Wuhan, China Using Time-Series Nighttime Light Images Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication ISPRS – International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci.  
  Volume Xlii-4/W20 Issue Pages 71-76  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2194-9034 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2762  
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