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Author Garrett, J. K., Donald, P. F., & Gaston, K. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Skyglow extends into the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; Conservation  
  Abstract The proportion of the Earth’s surface that experiences a naturally dark environment at night is rapidly declining with the introduction of artificial light. Biological impacts of this change have been documented from genes to ecosystems, and for a wide diversity of environments and organisms. The likely severity of these impacts depends heavily on the relationship between the distribution of artificial night-time lighting and biodiversity. Here, we carry out a global assessment of the overlap between areas of conservation priority and the most recent atlas of artificial skyglow. We show that of the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs), less than a third have completely pristine night-time skies, about a half lie entirely under artificially bright skies and only about a fifth contain no area in which night-time skies are not polluted to the zenith. The extent of light pollution of KBAs varies by region, affecting the greatest proportion of KBAs in Europe and the Middle East. Statistical modelling revealed associations between light pollution within KBAs and associated levels of both gross domestic product and human population density. This suggests that these patterns will worsen with continued economic development and growth in the human population  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2309  
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Author Russo, D., Ancillotto, L., Cistrone, L., Libralato, N., Domer, A., Cohen, S., Korine, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial illumination on drinking bats: a field test in forest and desert habitats Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Bats show pronounced and often‐adverse reactions to artificial illumination at night (ALAN) when commuting, roosting or foraging. ALAN also affects bat drinking activity, at least when lighting occurs over short intervals. We tested whether continuous illumination of drinking sites over 4‐h periods would lead bats to tolerate ALAN and resume drinking in the course of the night. We conducted our experiments in forest (Italy) and desert (Israel) sites to test whether in the latter habitat, where water is scarce, a greater motivation to drink might lead to less adverse bat reactions. We recorded 6853 drinking buzzes and 1647 feeding buzzes from 17 species and one species group. In the forest sites, species that hunt in open spaces or along forest edges showed little (P. pipistrellus and H. savii) or no (P. kuhlii and N. leisleri) drinking activity decrease, while those associated with forest interiors (Barbastella barbastellus, Plecotus auritus and bats in the genus Myotis) exhibited a strong negative response. In the desert sites, all studied species reduced drinking activity, yet in the desert populations of P. kuhlii we recorded stronger adverse reactions only far from human settlements. The harsh reactions that the desert bat species showed towards ALAN rule out any effect of a greater motivation to drink. Illumination had no effect on foraging by most species, except in the forest sites, where Pipistrellus kuhlii and Nyctalus leisleri increased foraging when the light was on, and in the desert sites, where Hypsugo bodenheimeri decreased foraging in such situations. The progressive human encroachment that is taking place in many world regions on both forests and especially deserts, where few sites for drinking are available, may jeopardize bat populations also through increased exposure to ALAN.  
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  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2075  
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Author Bará, S., Ulla, A. url  openurl
  Title Light Pollution in the Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park 2018 Report Type Report
  Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Conservation; Spain; Galicia; Europe; national park  
  Abstract The Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park (PNMTIAG), with the exception of the island of Cortegada, still has night skies of acceptable quality. However, the PNMTIAG islands are under strong photic pressures, both internal and external, that hinder the preservation of the basic features of the natural night, and call for an immediate action of all concerned stakeholders  
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  Publisher USC Tragsa Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Galician Summary Language Galician Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2187  
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Author Penchalaiah, K., Kumari, A.V., Naik, R.S., Deepthi, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Paederus Dermatitis: A Clinical Study of 200 Cases Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Indian Journal of Applied Research Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue 4 Pages 65-67  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Introduction: Paederus dermatitis is peculiar irritant dermatitis seen in regions with warm, tropical and subtropical regions, like India, causes significant morbidity and can be misleading in diagnosis. The study was conducted to know the clinical profile of Paederus dermatitis and to create awareness among medical practitioners about this condition. Materials & Methods: All clinically diagnosed cases of Paederus dermatitis were included in the study. Detailed history was taken and a thorough clinical examination was conducted in all the cases. Results: A total of 200 cases comprising of 124 males and 76 females were studied. Morphology of lesions was mainly linear, but zosteriform, kissing and bizarre lesions were also observed. Conclusion: Paederus dermatitis should be included in differential diagnosis while examining erythemato– vesicular lesions of sudden onset, especially on exposed body parts during rainy and post rainy season. Awareness of this condition and its clinical features among the physicians and medical practitioners will prevent misdiagnosis.  
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  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2069  
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K. M. & Xavia, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An overview of the cognitive and biological effects of city nighttime illumination including a London case study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Centre for Conscious Design Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Current scientific research demonstrates how critical the effects of city nighttime illumination are upon cognitive and biological health1 – which needs to be adequately acknowledged, understood and addressed by conscious cities and the plans they develop. Until recent decades, the design of nighttime lighting was determined mostly by electrical engineers who often applied technical standards to meet the requirements of vehicle-focused cities. Unfortunately, consideration of pedestrians and their visual needs to navigate throughout urbanscapes at night were ignored, and so too, was the impact that artificial lighting might have on them, and the environment. Today, the majority of urban city lighting has been installed without full awareness of its impact, and as a result, artificial light at night (ALAN) and light pollution have become an obvious public nuisance, a health risk and an environmental burden2,3. While poor lighting has its drawbacks, a lack of lighting can have many positive aspects, and urban settings can benefit from protecting, preserving and promoting natural darkness. We present two recent planning and design initiatives of London, in the UK, where the quality of light and value of darkness were not given the degree of attention and consideration they deserve. This paper has particular relevance for urban policy makers, city planners, architects, designers, consultants and researchers as it explores the various problems caused by the obvious lack of responsible nighttime illumination.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2296  
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