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Author Lee, E.; Kim, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light and Life at Night as Circadian Rhythm Disruptors Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Chronobiology in Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 95-102  
  Keywords Review; Human Health  
  Abstract Light is an important entraining agent for endogenous circadian rhythms. Artificial light at night (ALAN) negatively influences the circadian system, inducing acute effects on sleep and cognition, as well as chronic endocrine-disrupting effects resulting in obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. Although shift workers may be exposed to extreme ALAN, its impact on their health is obscured by factors such as daylight exposure, meal and sleep scheduling, and physical and social behavior. Studies have revealed a significant increase in breast cancer in high ALAN-polluted areas, although the correlation with outdoor or indoor lighting conditions is controversial. Increasing use of electronic devices makes it difficult to assess ALAN exposure in the general population. The development of surrogate markers and critical parameters is crucial for health study by ALAN exposure, and such markers should include risk factors related to ALAN exposure. The present review considers articles investigating the risk of ALAN for shift workers, the general population, and users of electronic devices, and addresses susceptibility factors, including age, sex, and chronotype. Shift workers may be regarded as an extreme ALAN-exposure group, but the growing use of electronic devices and lifestyle changes in the general population make difficult to differentiate ALAN risks to health.  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2903  
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Author Mascovich, K. A., Larson, L. R., & Andrews, K. M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lights On, or Lights Off? Hotel Guests' Response to Nonpersonal Educational Outreach Designed to Protect Nesting Sea Turtles Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Chelonian Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 206-215  
  Keywords Education; Psychology  
  Abstract Light pollution from beachfront hotels has the potential to impact nesting and hatching sea turtles. Education strategies could be used to alter visitor behavior and mitigate this threat. We tested the efficacy of a sea turtle–friendly education card that encouraged visitors to “protect the night, hide the light.” Cards were placed in beachfront hotel rooms at a prominent sea turtle nesting site: Jekyll Island, Georgia. We assessed visitor responses by conducting nightly observations to determine the proportion of occupied guest rooms with beach-visible lights under 2 different scenarios (cards present or cards absent). We found that less than half of all hotel guests closed room blinds to minimize artificial light on the nesting beach, and compliance rates seemed to be lower during peak visitation times. The nonpersonal educational treatment (card) had little effect on visitors' sea turtle–friendly lighting choices and behaviors, highlighting the need for other approaches to encourage responsible tourist behavior at ecologically sensitive beach destinations.  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2316  
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Author Papalambrou, A.; Bali, N. url  openurl
  Title Dark Sky Sim: An Open-Design Dark Sky Simulator Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Communicating Astronomy with the Public Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue Pages 24-26  
  Keywords Education; Skyglow  
  Abstract This article describes the key steps on how to construct the Dark Sky Simulator, the outcome of the Dark Sky Sim project. The Dark Sky Simulator is a “physical simulator” to demonstrate the effects of light pollution on the starry sky and the concept of proper lighting. The simulator consists of an LED sky model simulating the starry sky and LED model streetlighting. The simulator creates for users a first-hand experience of light pollution caused by various light fixtures. The simulator was successfully completed, and information on how to construct a simulator with simple tools and inexpensive components are made available online for free. Building the simulator is a very exciting STEM project involving hands-on construction and programming skills in addition to learning astronomy concepts, making it a useful resource for both educational and outreach communities. The project was funded by the International Astronomical Union Office of Astronomy for Development (IAU OAD).  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2875  
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Author Fabian, M.; Lessmann, C.; Sofke, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Natural disasters and regional development – the case of earthquakes Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environment and Development Economics Abbreviated Journal Envir. Dev. Econ.  
  Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 479-505  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract We analyze the impact of earthquakes on nighttime lights at a sub-national level, i.e., on grids of different size. We argue that existing studies on the impact of natural disasters on economic development have several important limitations, both at the level of the outcome variable as well as at the level of the independent variable, e.g., the timing of an event and the measuring of its intensity. We aim to overcome these limitations by using geophysical event data on earthquakes together with satellite nighttime lights. Using panel fixed effects regressions covering the entire world for the period 1992–2013, we find that earthquakes reduce both light growth rates and light levels significantly. The effects persist for approximately 5 years, but we find no long-run effects. Effects are stronger the smaller the area of a unit of observation. National institutions and economic conditions are relevant moderating factors.  
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  ISSN 1355-770X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3000  
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Author Bowden, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An Analysis of Factors Affecting Catches of Insects in Light-Traps Type Journal Article
  Year 1982 Publication Bulletin of Entomological Research Abbreviated Journal Bull. Entomol. Res.  
  Volume 72 Issue 4 Pages 535-556  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals  
  Abstract Analysis of published data on catches of insects in light-traps with a variety of light sources and of different designs showed that all conformed to the previously proposed model describing the functioning of a light-trap: catch = constant × where W = trap illumination and I = background illumination. Light-trap catches in differing cloud conditions and in open and woodland situations also varied as predicted by the model. A table of correction factors for different amounts of cloud cover is provided. The results are discussed in relation to use of light-traps and interpretation of light-trap data.  
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  ISSN 0007-4853 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2589  
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