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Author Froidevaux, J.S.P.; Fialas, P.C.; Jones, G.; Pettorelli, N.; Merchant, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Catching insects while recording bats: impacts of light trapping on acoustic sampling Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Remote Sens Ecol Conserv  
  Volume 4 Issue 3 Pages 240-247  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Collecting information on bat prey availability usually involves the use of light traps to capture moths and flies that constitute the main prey items of most insectivorous bats. However, despite the recent awareness on the adverse effects of light on bats, little is known regarding the potential impacts of light trapping on the bat sampling outcomes when passive acoustic sampling and light trapping are implemented simultaneously. Using a before–after experimental design that involved the installation of a 6 W actinic light trap 1 m away from the bat detector, we tested the predictions that (1) slow‐flying bat species will be less active when the light trap is present, while the opposite will be true for fast‐flying species; and (2) bat species richness will be lower at lit conditions compared to dark ones. Our results suggest that the use of light traps in combination with bat detectors may considerably influence the outcomes of acoustic sampling. Although the activity of fast‐flying bat species did not differ between the two treatments, we found that the activity of slow‐flying ones such as Rhinolophus ferrumequinum and Rhinolophus hipposideros decreased significantly at lit conditions. Furthermore, we recorded fewer bat species when the light trap was deployed. To overcome this issue, we strongly recommend either (1) placing light traps at a considerable distance from bat detectors; or (2) using light traps during the night that follows the bat sampling if sampling needs to be at the same position; or (3) deploying non‐attractant insect traps such as Malaise traps if Lepidoptera is not the main order targeted.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2056-3485 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2092  
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Author Sheehan, R.E.; Carovillano, R.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Characteristics of the Equatorward Auroral Boundary Near Midnight Determined from DMSP Images Type Journal Article
  Year 1978 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.  
  Volume 83 Issue A10 Pages 4749-4754  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The latitude of the equatorward auroral boundary near local midnight has been determined for 162 Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) images in November‐December 1972. When grouped according to Kp and AE, these observations show approximate linear decreases in the average boundary latitude with increasing values of these magnetic indices. There appears also to be a slight diurnal variation in the boundary location. Mapping of the appropriate McIlwain injection boundaries to auroral latitudes shows good agreement with the average DMSP equatorward auroral boundary latitude. Similar analyses at 2000 and 2200 CGLT (corrected geomagnetic local time) using a different set of DMSP images yield similar results, with somewhat poorer agreement under quiet conditions.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2386  
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Author Eather, R.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title DMSP calibration Type Journal Article
  Year 1979 Publication Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics Abbreviated Journal J. Geophys. Res.  
  Volume 84 Issue A8 Pages 4134-4144  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Although DMSP satellite data are widely used, there has been no reliable absolute calibration. Coordinated data with ground‐based photometers allow a calibration curve of film density versus 4728 N2+ intensity to be derived. The DMSP satellites (5C series) record airglow and can detect auroral forms of intensities ≥50 R of 4278 N2+. It is estimated that the 5D series satellites are capable of detecting auroras with ∼25 R of 4278 N2+.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0148-0227 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2385  
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Author Becker, A.; Whitfield, A.K.; Cowley, P.D.; Järnegren, J.; Naesje, T.F.; Crispo, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Potential effects of artificial light associated with anthropogenic infrastructure on the abundance and foraging behaviour of estuary-associated fishes Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol  
  Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 43-50  
  Keywords fish; biology; ecology  
  Abstract As a consequence of a positive phototaxic response, the findings of this study suggest that artificial light often associated with man-made structures has the potential to alter fish communities within urban estuarine ecosystems by creating optimal conditions for predators. Future coastal developments should consider the ecological implications of lighting on aquatic communities. We recommend that lighting be minimized around coastal infrastructure and the use of red lights, which have limited penetration though water, be considered.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 64  
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Author Minnaar, C.; Boyles, J.G.; Minnaar, I.A.; Sole, C.L.; McKechnie, A.E.; McKenzie, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Stacking the odds: light pollution may shift the balance in an ancient predator-prey arms race Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Journal of Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Appl Ecol  
  Volume 52 Issue 2 Pages 522-531  
  Keywords Ecology; animals; bats; insects; predation; Neoromicia capensis; moths; Cape serotine bat; co-evolution; eared moth; Lepidoptera; predator–prey interactions; prey selection  
  Abstract 1. Artificial night lighting threatens to disrupt strongly conserved light-dependent processes in animals and may have cascading effects on ecosystems as species interactions become altered. Insectivorous bats and their prey have been involved in a nocturnal, co-evolutionary arms race for millions of years. Lights may interfere with anti-bat defensive behaviours in moths, and disrupt a complex and globally ubiquitous interaction between bats and insects, ultimately leading to detrimental consequences for ecosystems on a global scale.

2. We combined experimental and mathematical approaches to determine effects of light pollution on a free-living bat–insect community. We compared prey selection by Cape serotine bats Neoromicia capensis in naturally unlit and artificially lit conditions using a manipulative field experiment, and developed a probabilistic model based on a suite of prey-selection factors to explain differences in observed diet.

3.Moth consumption by N. capensis was low under unlit conditions (mean percentage volume ± SD: 5·91 ± 6·25%), while moth consumption increased sixfold (mean percentage volume ± SD: 35·42 ± 17·90%) under lit conditions despite a decrease in relative moth abundance. Predictive prey-selection models that included high-efficacy estimates for eared-moth defensive behaviour found most support given diet data for bats in unlit conditions. Conversely, models that estimated eared-moth defensive behaviour as absent or low found more support given diet data for bats in lit conditions. Our models therefore suggest the increase in moth consumption was a result of light-induced, decreased eared-moth defensive behaviour.

4. Policy implications. In the current context of unyielding growth in global light pollution, we predict that specialist moth-eating bats and eared moths will face ever-increasing challenges to survival through increased resource competition and predation risk, respectively. Lights should be developed to be less attractive to moths, with the goal of reducing effects on moth behaviour. Unfortunately, market preference for broad-spectrum lighting and possible effects on other taxa make development of moth-friendly lighting improbable. Mitigation should therefore focus on the reduction of temporal, spatial and luminance redundancy in outdoor lighting. Restriction of light inside nature reserves and urban greenbelts can help maintain dark refugia for moth-eating bats and moths, and may become important for their persistence.
 
  Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Mammal Research Institute, University of Pretoria, Hatfield, South Africa  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1085  
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