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Author Bissonnette, T.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Modification of mammalian sexual cycles. V. The avenue of reception of sexually stimulating light Type Journal Article
  Year 1936 Publication Journal of Comparative Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Comparative Psychology  
  Volume 22 Issue 1 Pages 93-103  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The author subjected female ferrets of controlled previous light and sexual history to added nightly lighting (1) without hoods, (2) with hoods which exposed the eyes through holes, and (3) with heads covered by light-tight hoods. The conditions of decreased light on the eyes were associated with delayed oestrus. “The facts indicate that the eyes are the receptors for photo-periodic sexual stimulation in ferrets, mediated by the anterior hypophysis, and that closing their eyes in sleep does not prevent the activation.”  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0093-4127 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2400  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brundin, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light reactions of terrestrial amphipods Type Journal Article
  Year 1913 Publication Journal of Animal Behavior Abbreviated Journal Journal of Animal Behavior  
  Volume 3 Issue 5 Pages 334-352  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Investigated the responses of amphipods to light. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the mechanism of the phototactic response, and the cause of reversal in the sense of phototaxis. Varying numbers of Ss were tested on reaction time to light and heat. The more terrestrial forms among the amphipoda were more positive. Concluded that the conditions which brought about the positive phototaxis were the same, as prevailed in the environment of the more terrestrial amphipoda. Heat and dryness favored positive reactions, while cold, moisture and silence favored negative reactions. The small specimen of O. traskiana had shorter periods of negative reactions than the more sluggish specimen, which could be made positive to the light by enforced activity, dryness and heat, resulting in metabolic processes through which chemical responses necessary for a response took place. The modification of the response helped in adaptation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0095-9928 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2419  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dutta, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Insights into the impacts of three current environmental problems on Amphibians Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 4 Issue 2 Pages 15-27  
  Keywords Animals; Review  
  Abstract Global warming, light pollution and noise are common human-induced environmental problems that are escalating at a high rate. Their consequences on wildlife have mostly been overlooked, with the exception of a few species with respect to climate change. The problems often occur simultaneously and exert their negative effects together at the same time. In other words, their impacts are combined. Studies have never focused on more than one problem, and so, such combined effects have never been understood properly. The review addresses this lacuna in the case of amphibians, which are a highly vulnerable group. It divides the overall impacts of the problems into seven categories (behaviour, health, movement, distribution, phenology, development and reproductive success) and then assesses their combined impact through statistical analyses. It revealed that amphibian calling is the most vulnerable aspect to the combined impacts. This could provide important input for conservation of amphibians.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1339-8474 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2166  
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Author Grove, L. pdf  url
openurl 
  Title Reducing Acadia's Light Pollution Type Manuscript
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Conservation; Society; Economics; Acadia National Park; Maine; benefit cost analysis; astrotourism; contingent valuation method; dark sky places; dark sky park  
  Abstract Acadia National Park is among the most visited national parks in the United States, attracting millions of people per year. Thousands of those visitors come to the park for “astro-tourism,” as Acadia has become one of the premier stargazing locations on the east coast. There remains, however, the continued threat from light pollution from the surrounding communities that negatively affects Acadia's darkness, contributing to a lesser visitor experience and potentially harming native ecosystems. Although park management and community organizations have engaged in significant efforts to decrease Acadia's nighttime light levels and raise awareness among visitors and locals regarding the importance of darkness, the park still seek to continue to decrease light pollution. This report developed policy options that could help solve the long-term policy goal of decreasing nighttime lighting levels within and around Acadia while also using the International Dark-Sky Association's Dark-Sky Park designation requirements as a reasonable, short-term policy benchmark.

Working within existing organizations, the policy options crafted to address Acadia’s nighttime lighting levels were analyzed both qualitatively through a criteria evaluation and quantitatively through a Benefit Cost Analysis.

The options included 1) the formation of a Darkness Coalition within the League of Towns, 2) a reimagining of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Dark-Sky Project into the Dark-Sky Taskforce, 3) the creation of a Lighting Consultant position paid through the Friends of Acadia Wild Acadia initiative, and 4) the combination of Coalition and the Taskforce into the League of Towns – Dark-Sky Partnership (LOT-DSP). The report recommends the adoption of Option 4 – the creation of the LOT – DSP. While this option does not provide the greatest estimated monetary net value compared to the Status Quo in the quantitative evaluation, it still provides an estimated benefit of about $105 million over the course of five years and is the strongest option in the qualitative analysis. The LOT – DSP provides the best opportunity for Acadia to achieve legitimate and long-lasting nighttime light level reduction.
 
  Address Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Garrett Hall, 235 McCormick Road, P.O. Box 400893, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4893 USA; locher.grove(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher University of Virginia Place of Publication Charlottesville Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1449  
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Author Briggs, R. C. url  openurl
  Title Why does aid not target the poorest? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication AIDDATA Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Foreign aid projects typically have local effects, so if they are to reduce poverty then they need to be placed close to the poor. I show that, conditional on local population, World Bank (WB) project aid targets richer parts of countries. This relationship holds over time and across world regions. I test five explanations for pro-rich targeting using a pre-registered conjoint experiment on WB task team leaders (TTLs). TTLs perceive aid-receiving governments as most interested in targeting aid politically and controlling implementation. They also believe that aid works better in poorer or more remote areas, but that implementation in these areas is uniquely difficult. These results speak to debates in distributive politics, international bargaining over aid, and principal-agent issues in international organizations. The results also suggest that tweaks to WB incentive structures to make ease of project implementation less important may encourage aid to flow to poorer parts of countries.  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2719  
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