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Author Tierney, S.M.; Friedrich, M.; Humphreys, W.F.; Jones, T.M.; Warrant, E.J.; Wcislo, W.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Consequences of evolutionary transitions in changing photic environments: Transitions in photic environments Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Austral Entomology Abbreviated Journal Austral Entomology  
  Volume 56 Issue 1 Pages 23-46  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Light represents one of the most reliable environmental cues in the biological world. In this review we focus on the evolutionary consequences to changes in organismal photic environments, with a specific focus on the class Insecta. Particular emphasis is placed on transitional forms that can be used to track the evolution from (1) diurnal to nocturnal (dim-light) or (2) surface to subterranean (aphotic) environments, as well as (3) the ecological encroachment of anthropomorphic light on nocturnal habitats (artificial light at night). We explore the influence of the light environment in an integrated manner, highlighting the connections between phenotypic adaptations (behaviour, morphology, neurology and endocrinology), molecular genetics and their combined influence on organismal fitness. We begin by outlining the current knowledge of insect photic niches and the organismal adaptations and molecular modifications that have evolved for life in those environments. We then outline concepts and guidelines for future research in the fields of natural history, ethology, neurology, morphology and particularly the advantages that high throughput sequencing provides to these aspects of investigation. Finally, we highlight that the power of such integrative science lies in its ability to make phylogenetically robust comparative assessments of evolution, ones that are grounded by empirical evidence derived from a concrete understanding of organismal natural history.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2052174X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1610  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author You, X.; Monahan, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A thirst for development: mapping water stress using night-time stable lights as predictors of province-level water stress in China Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Area Abbreviated Journal Area  
  Volume 49 Issue 4 Pages 477-485  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Given the rapid development within China, the inequality of available water resources has been increasingly of interest. Current methods for assessing water stress are inadequate for province‐scale rapid monitoring. A more responsive indicator at a finer scale is needed to understand the distribution of water stress in China. This paper selected Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Line‐scan System night‐time stable lights as a proxy for water stress at the province level in China from 2004 to 2012, as night‐time lights are closely linked with population density, electricity consumption and other social, economic and environmental indicators associated with water stress. The linear regression results showed the intensity of night‐time lights can serve as a predictive tool to assess water stress across provinces with an R2 from 0.797 to 0.854. The model worked especially well in some regions, such as East China, North China and South West China. Nonetheless, confounding factors interfered with the predictive relationship, including population density, level of economic development, natural resource endowment and industrial structures, etc. The model was not greatly improved by building a multi‐variable linear regression including agricultural and industrial indicators. A straightforward predictor of water stress using remotely sensed data was developed.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-0894 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2030  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Van Geffen, K.G.; Groot, A.T.; Van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Donners, M.; Berendse, F.; Veenendaal, E.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial night lighting disrupts sex pheromone in a noctuid moth: Moth sex pheromone in illuminated nights Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Ecol Entomol  
  Volume 40 Issue 4 Pages 401-408  
  Keywords Animals; moths; Disruption; light pollution; Mamestra brassicae; sex pheromone composition; sexual communication  
  Abstract 1. One major, yet poorly studied, change in the environment is the increase in nocturnal light pollution. Although this strongly alters the habitat of nocturnal species, the ecological consequences are poorly known. Moths are well known to be attracted to artificial light sources, but artificial light may affect them in other ways as well.

2. In this study, female Mamestra brassicae moths were subjected to various types of low-intensity artificial night lighting with contrasting spectral compositions (green-rich, red-rich, warm white) or to a dark control treatment and the effects on their sex pheromone production and composition were tested.

3. Artificial night lighting reduced sex pheromone production and altered the chemical composition of the pheromone blend, irrespective of spectral composition. Specifically, amounts of the main pheromone component Z11-16:Ac were reduced, while the deterring compounds Z9-14:Ac, Z9-16:Ac, and Z11-16:OH were increased relative to Z11-16:Ac when females were kept under artificial light. These changes may reduce the effectiveness of the sex pheromones, becoming less attractive for males.

4. These results show for the first time that artificial light at night affects processes that are involved in moth reproduction. The potential for mitigation through manipulation of the spectral composition of artificial light appears limited.
 
  Address Astrid T. Groot, Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam, the Netherlands. E-mail: a.t.groot(at)uva.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1153  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Persons, W.E.; Eason, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human activity and habitat type affect perceived predation risk in urban white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 123 Issue 5 Pages 348-356  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Predation risk is one of the largest costs associated with foraging in small mammals. Small mammals select microhabitat features such as tree and shrub canopy cover, woody debris and vegetative ground cover that can lower the risk of detection from predators and provide greater protection if discovered. Small mammals also increase foraging activity and decrease selection for cover when cloud cover increases and moon illumination is less. Often researchers assume small mammals in urban areas respond to these cues in the same manner as in natural areas, but these cues themselves are altered in urban zones. In this study, we investigated how Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) and coarse woody debris (CWD) affected giving-up density (GUD) in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Each of three habitat treatments (open flood channel, the edge and interior of the honeysuckle patch) contained cover treatments with coarse woody debris present or absent. The six treatment combinations were compared to environmental variables (temperature, humidity and illumination) and habitat variables to test their effect on GUD. Peromyscus leucopus foraged to lower densities in areas with CWD present and also under the honeysuckle canopy, using this invasive shrub to decrease predation risk, potentially increasing survivability within this urban park. Increased human presence negatively affected foraging behavior across treatments. Human presence and light pollution significantly influenced P. leucopus, modifying their foraging behavior and demonstrating that both fine- and coarse-scale urban factors can affect small mammals. Foraging increased as humidity increased, particularly under the honeysuckle canopy. Changes in illumination due to moonlight and cloud cover did not affect foraging behavior, suggesting urban light pollution may have altered behavioral responses to changes in light levels. Lonicera maackii seemed to facilitate foraging in P. leucopus, even though it adversely affects the plant community, suggesting that its impact may not be entirely negative.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1642  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Underhill, V.A.; Höbel, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) is robust to anthropogenic light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology  
  Volume 124 Issue 8 Pages 537-548  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Human activities are drastically changing the amount of artificial light entering natural habitats. Because light pollution alters the sensory environment, it may interfere with behaviors ranging from prey detection and vigilance to mate choice. Here, we test the hypothesis that anthropogenic light pollution affects the mate choice behavior of female Eastern Gray Treefrogs (Hyla versicolor). We tested this hypothesis under two experimental light treatments that simulate the light pollution created by streetlights (expansion of lit areas and increased light intensity), and the light pollution created by headlights of passing vehicles (rapid fluctuations between bright and dark conditions). The hypothesis predicts that females tested under conditions simulating light pollution will show behavioral changes geared toward mitigating detection by predators, such as relaxed preferences, decreased choosiness for the normally preferred call, and differences in approach behavior (either more directional, faster, or stealthier movements, or no approach at all). Contrary to our prediction, we found that light pollution did not affect mate choice behavior in Gray Treefrogs, and should therefore neither interfere with population persistence nor affect the sexual selection regimes on male call traits of this species. However, we caution that this result does not imply that anthropogenic light pollution is of no concern for amphibian conservation, because behavioral responses to variation in nocturnal light levels (both in the natural as well as anthropogenically enhanced range) seem to be highly species‐specific in anurans. We encourage additional studies to help gage the vulnerability of anurans to anthropogenic light pollution.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2090  
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