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Author Garstang, R.H.
Title Mount Wilson Observatory: The Sad Story of Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication The Observatory Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 124 Issue Pages 14-21
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The brightness of night sky at the Mount Wilson Observatory has been calculated for the years from 1900 to 2000. Data on the street lighting in Los Angeles City and estimates for light from residences, shops, and businesses have been used to calculate the per capita light-emission rates. These have been used in model brightness calculations with the populations of many cities in the Los Angeles Basin. The results show the relentless increase in night-sky brightness that is continuing at this time.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2538
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Author Strutt, R.J.
Title A photoelectric method of measuring the light of the night sky with studies of the course of variation through the night Type Journal Article
Year 1929 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Containing Papers of a Mathematical and Physical Character Abbreviated Journal Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A
Volume (down) 124 Issue 794 Pages 395-408
Keywords Instrumentation; Natural Sky Brightness; Airglow
Abstract The investigations already published on the intensity of the night sky have been made by means of visual photometry, using a convenient instrument with a self-contained luminous source of radioactive origin. Nothing could rival this for simplicity and portability; it is always ready and requires no attention. On the other hand visual photometry is not a very satisfactory process even for ordinary light, and with this faint light it is far from giving the desirable degree of accuracy. I have therefore spent much effort in trying to replace it by some photoelectric method of measurement. A satisfactory method has now been evolved, and will be described, together with the results. A preliminary notice of the earlier results was given in a paper written at the request of Prof. S. Chapman, F. R. S., Chairman of the International Committee on Terrestrial and Solar Relationships, the receipt of which was acknowledged by him on June 19, 1928. The relevant passage is:- “Most of the difficulties have been overcome and preliminary observations have been in progress for some months past. I have been able to follow the changes of intensity from hour to hour on clear nights. Some evidence has been found suggesting diurnal periodicity. The observed intensity nearly always increases between nightfall and midnight, beyond which the observations have not usually been carried.”
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ISSN 0950-1207 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3124
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Author Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S.F.; Aceituno, F.J.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Negro, J.J.; Soriguer, R.C.; Gomez, G.S.
Title An All-Sky Transmission Monitor: ASTMON Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
Volume (down) 123 Issue 907 Pages 1076-1086
Keywords monitoring; light at night; light pollution; skyglow
Abstract We present here the All-Sky Transmission Monitor (ASTMON), designed to perform a continuous monitoring of the surface brightness of the complete night sky in several bands. The data acquired are used to derive, in addition, a subsequent map of the multiband atmospheric extinction at any location in the sky and a map of the cloud coverage. The instrument has been manufactured to withstand extreme weather conditions and to remain operative. Designed to be fully robotic, it is ideal to be installed outdoors as a permanent monitoring station. The preliminary results based on two of the currently operative units (at Doñana National Park, Huelva, and at the Calar Alto Observatory, Almería, Spain) are presented here. The parameters derived using ASTMON are in good agreement with those previously reported, which illustrates the validity of the design and the accuracy of the manufacturing. The information provided by this instrument will be presented in forthcoming articles, once we have accumulated a statistically significant amount of data.
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ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 195
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Author Persons, W.E.; Eason, P.
Title Human activity and habitat type affect perceived predation risk in urban white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Ethology Abbreviated Journal Ethology
Volume (down) 123 Issue 5 Pages 348-356
Keywords Animals
Abstract Predation risk is one of the largest costs associated with foraging in small mammals. Small mammals select microhabitat features such as tree and shrub canopy cover, woody debris and vegetative ground cover that can lower the risk of detection from predators and provide greater protection if discovered. Small mammals also increase foraging activity and decrease selection for cover when cloud cover increases and moon illumination is less. Often researchers assume small mammals in urban areas respond to these cues in the same manner as in natural areas, but these cues themselves are altered in urban zones. In this study, we investigated how Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) and coarse woody debris (CWD) affected giving-up density (GUD) in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). Each of three habitat treatments (open flood channel, the edge and interior of the honeysuckle patch) contained cover treatments with coarse woody debris present or absent. The six treatment combinations were compared to environmental variables (temperature, humidity and illumination) and habitat variables to test their effect on GUD. Peromyscus leucopus foraged to lower densities in areas with CWD present and also under the honeysuckle canopy, using this invasive shrub to decrease predation risk, potentially increasing survivability within this urban park. Increased human presence negatively affected foraging behavior across treatments. Human presence and light pollution significantly influenced P. leucopus, modifying their foraging behavior and demonstrating that both fine- and coarse-scale urban factors can affect small mammals. Foraging increased as humidity increased, particularly under the honeysuckle canopy. Changes in illumination due to moonlight and cloud cover did not affect foraging behavior, suggesting urban light pollution may have altered behavioral responses to changes in light levels. Lonicera maackii seemed to facilitate foraging in P. leucopus, even though it adversely affects the plant community, suggesting that its impact may not be entirely negative.
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ISSN 0179-1613 ISBN Medium
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1642
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Author Garstang, R. H.
Title Light Pollution at Mount Wilson and at Palomar in 1931-32 Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication The Observatory Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 122 Issue Pages
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract I present a short summary of an unpublished letter by Joel Stebbins on light pollution at Mount Wilson Observatory and on Palmar Mountain in 1931-32. I analyzed his results and show that the light emission per capita in 1932 – o was about 3*1*10^17 photons s^-1 in the blue region, equivalent to about 220 lumens per head in the visual region. These my be compared with about 1*4*10^18 photons s^-1 in the blue region and about 1000 lumens per head in the visual region for California cities in 1970.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2622
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