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Author Rebke, M.; Dierschke, V.; Weiner, C.N.; Aumüller, R.; Hill, K.; Hill, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Attraction of nocturnally migrating birds to artificial light: The influence of colour, intensity and blinking mode under different cloud cover conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 233 Issue Pages 220-227  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A growing number of offshore wind farms have led to a tremendous increase in artificial lighting in the marine environment. This study disentangles the connection of light characteristics, which potentially influence the reaction of nocturnally migrating passerines to artificial illumination under different cloud cover conditions. In a spotlight experiment on a North Sea island, birds were exposed to combinations of light colour (red, yellow, green, blue, white), intensity (half, full) and blinking mode (intermittent, continuous) while measuring their number close to the light source with thermal imaging cameras.

We found that no light variant was constantly avoided by nocturnally migrating passerines crossing the sea. The number of birds did neither differ between observation periods with blinking light of different colours nor compared to darkness. While intensity did not influence the number attracted, birds were drawn more towards continuous than towards blinking illumination, when stars were not visible. Red continuous light was the only exception that did not differ from the blinking counterpart. Continuous green, blue and white light attracted significantly more birds than continuous red light in overcast situations.

Our results suggest that light sources offshore should be restricted to a minimum, but if lighting is needed, blinking light is to be preferred over continuous light, and if continuous light is required, red light should be applied.
 
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  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2255  
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Author Coulthard, E.; Norrey, J.; Shortall, C.; Harris, W.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ecological traits predict population changes in moths Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 233 Issue Pages 213-219  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Understanding the ecological traits which predispose species to local or global extinction allows for more effective pre-emptive conservation management interventions. Insect population declines are a major facet of the global biodiversity crisis, yet even in Europe they remain poorly understood. Here we identify traits linked to population trends in ‘common and widespread’ UK moths. Population trend data from the Rothamsted Research Insect Survey spanning 40 years was subject to classification and regression models to identify common traits among species experiencing a significant change in occurrence. Our final model had an accuracy of 76% and managed to predict declining species on 90% of occasions, but was less successful with increasing species. By far the most powerful predictor associated for declines was moth wingspan with large species declining more frequently. Preference for woody or herbaceous larval food sources, nocturnal photoperiod activity, and richness of habitats occupied also proved to be significantly associated with decline. Our results suggest that ecological traits can be reliably used to predict declines in moths, and that this model could be used for Data Deficient species, of which there are many.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2260  
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Author Saini, C.; Hutton, P.; Gao, S.; Simpson, R.K.; Giraudeau, M.; Sepp, T.; Webb, E.; McGraw, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to artificial light at night increases innate immune activity during development in a precocial bird Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol  
  Volume (down) 233 Issue Pages 84-88  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; king quail; Excalfactoria chinensis; immunity  
  Abstract Humans have greatly altered Earth's night-time photic environment via the production of artificial light at night (ALAN; e.g. street lights, car traffic, billboards, lit buildings). ALAN is a problem of growing importance because it may significantly disrupt the seasonal and daily physiological rhythms and behaviors of animals. There has been considerable interest in the impacts of ALAN on health of humans and other animals, but most of this work has centered on adults and we know comparatively little about effects on young animals. We exposed 3-week-old king quail (Excalfactoria chinensis) to a constant overnight blue-light regime for 6 weeks and assessed weekly bactericidal activity of plasma against Escherichia coli – a commonly employed metric of innate immunity in animals. We found that chronic ALAN exposure significantly increased bactericidal activity and that this elevation in immune performance manifested at different developmental time points in males and females. Whether this short-term increase in immune activity can be extended to wild animals, and whether ALAN-mediated increases in immune activity have positive or negative fitness effects are unknown and will provide interesting avenues for future studies.  
  Address School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, United States of America. Electronic address: Kevin.McGraw@asu.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30974186 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2291  
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Author Li, X.; Ma, R.; Zhang, Q.; Li, D.; Liu, S.; He, T.; Zhao, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Anisotropic characteristic of artificial light at night – Systematic investigation with VIIRS DNB multi-temporal observations Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume (down) 233 Issue Pages 111357  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation  
  Abstract The released VIIRS DNB nightly images, also known as VIIRS DNB daily nighttime images, provide rich information for time series analysis of global socioeconomic dynamics. Anisotropic characteristic is a possible factor that influences the VIIRS DNB radiance at night and its time series analysis. This study aims to investigate the relationship between viewing angles and VIIRS DNB radiance of Suomi NPP satellite in urban areas. First, twenty-nine points were selected globally to explore the angle variation of Suomi NPP satellite views at night. We found that the variation of the satellite viewing zenith angle (VZA) is consistent (e.g. between 0° and 70°) since the range of VZA is fixed depending on the sensor design, and the range of viewing azimuth angle (VAA) increases with the increase of latitude. Second, thirty points in cities of Beijing, Houston, Los Angeles, Moscow, Quito and Sydney, were used to investigate the angle-radiance relationship. We proposed a zenith-radiance quadratic (ZRQ) model and a zenith-azimuth-radiance binary quadratic (ZARBQ) model to quantify the relationship between satellite viewing angles and artificial light radiance, which has been corrected by removing the moonlight and atmospheric impact from VIIRS DNB radiance products. For all the thirty points, the ZRQ and ZARBQ analysis have averaged R2 of 0.50 and 0.53, respectively, which indicates that the viewing angles are important factors influencing the variation of the artificial light radiance, but extending zenith to zenith-azimuth does not much better explain the variation of the observed artificial light. Importantly, based on the data analysis, we can make the hypothesis that building height may affect the relationship between VZA and artificial light, and cold and hot spot effects are clearly found in tall building areas. These findings are potentially useful to reconstruct more stable time series VIIRS DNB images for socioeconomic applications by removing the angular effects.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2621  
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Author Morelli, F.; Benedetti, Y.; Moravec, D.; Jerzak, L.; Tryjanowski, P.; Liang, W.; Møller, A.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global congruence between cuckoo species richness and biodiversity hotspots Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 232 Issue Pages 28-34  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Considering loss of biodiversity a global threat, cost-effective tools for monitoring spatial distribution of species are relevant for conservation planning. The aims of this study were (a) to compare the global pattern of species richness in Cuculidae with species richness of birds, amphibians and mammals; (b) whether it is spatially congruent with hotspot areas of biodiversity at a global scale; and (c) whether the distribution of night light intensity reflecting human population density is associated with cuckoo species richness. We mapped the global distribution of all cuckoo species, classified as parasitic or non-parasitic species. Species richness was calculated at a fixed spatial scale for: Cuculidae, amphibians, birds and mammals. We applied Generalized Linear Mixed Models in order to explore the associations between species richness of each group of animals, night light intensity and hotspots of biodiversity areas at a global scale.

Worldwide patterns of species richness of parasitic and non-parasitic cuckoos reflected species richness of birds, amphibians and mammals. In addition, and importantly, species richness of cuckoos was spatially congruent with hotspot areas of biodiversity across the world. Finally, night light intensity was slightly positively associated with species richness of parasitic cuckoos. Our findings confirmed that cuckoos constitute an important surrogate of high species richness of different animal taxa at a global scale: It is easy to learn how to identify cuckoos, whereas other species of birds, mammals or amphibians can only be identified by specialists. Our findings also suggest that other parasitic cuckoo species can be used as a biodiversity surrogate in a similar way as the common cuckoo in Eurasia.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2207  
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