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Author Hozer, C.; Pifferi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Physiological and cognitive consequences of a daily 26 h photoperiod in a primate: exploring the underlying mechanisms of the circadian resonance theory Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 287 Issue 1931 Pages 20201079  
  Keywords Animals; Body Temperature; Cheirogaleidae/*physiology; Circadian Clocks; *Circadian Rhythm; Cognition; Male; Motor Activity; Photoperiod; Vibration; *circadian clock resonance; *cognition; *physiological costs; *synchronization  
  Abstract The biological clock expresses circadian rhythms, whose endogenous period (tau) is close to 24 h. Daily resetting of the circadian clock to the 24 h natural photoperiod might induce marginal costs that would accumulate over time and forward affect fitness. It was proposed as the circadian resonance theory. For the first time, we aimed to evaluate these physiological and cognitive costs that would partially explain the mechanisms of the circadian resonance hypothesis. We evaluated the potential costs of imposing a 26 h photoperiodic regimen compared to the classical 24 h entrainment measuring several physiological and cognitive parameters (body temperature, energetic expenditure, oxidative stress, cognitive performances) in males of a non-human primate (Microcebus murinus), a nocturnal species whose endogenous period is about 23.5 h. We found significant higher resting body temperature and energy expenditure and lower cognitive performances when the photoperiodic cycle length was 26 h. Together these results suggest that a great deviation of external cycles from tau leads to daily greater energetic expenditure, and lower cognitive capacities. To our knowledge, this study is the first to highlight potential mechanisms of circadian resonance theory.  
  Address UMR CNRS MNHN 7179 MECADEV, 1 Avenue du Petit Chateau 91800 Brunoy, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32693726; PMCID:PMC7423648 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3243  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Thawley, C.J.; Kolbe, J.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night increases growth and reproductive output in Anolis lizards Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 287 Issue 1919 Pages 20191682  
  Keywords Animals; Female; Lighting; Lizards; Male; Reproduction; artificial light at night; invasive species; life history; reproduction; urbanization  
  Abstract Since the invention of electric lighting, artificial light at night (ALAN) has become a defining, and evolutionary novel, feature of human-altered environments especially in cities. ALAN imposes negative impacts on many organisms, including disrupting endocrine function, metabolism, and reproduction. However, we do not know how generalized these impacts are across taxa that exploit urban environments. We exposed brown anole lizards, an abundant and invasive urban exploiter, to relevant levels of ALAN in the laboratory and assessed effects on growth and reproduction at the start of the breeding season. Male and female anoles exposed to ALAN increased growth and did not suffer increased levels of corticosterone. ALAN exposure induced earlier egg-laying, likely by mimicking a longer photoperiod, and increased reproductive output without reducing offspring quality. These increases in growth and reproduction should increase fitness. Anoles, and potentially other taxa, may be resistant to some negative effects of ALAN and able to take advantage of the novel niche space ALAN creates. ALAN and both its negative and positive impacts may play a crucial role in determining which species invade and exploit urban environments.  
  Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA; cthawley ( at ) gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31964308; PMCID:PMC7015333 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3308  
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Author Becker, D.J.; Singh, D.; Pan, Q.; Montoure, J.D.; Talbott, K.M.; Wanamaker, S.M.; Ketterson, E.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night amplifies seasonal relapse of haemosporidian parasites in a widespread songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 287 Issue 1935 Pages 20201831  
  Keywords *Animal Migration; Animals; Breeding; Parasitemia; Parasites; Recurrence; Seasons; Songbirds/*parasitology; *Junco hyemalis; *avian malaria; *ecoimmunology; *generalized additive models; *photoperiod; *urbanization  
  Abstract Urban habitats can shape interactions between hosts and parasites by altering not only exposure rates but also within-host processes. Artificial light at night (ALAN) is common in urban environments, and chronic exposure can impair host immunity in ways that may increase infection. However, studies of causal links between this stressor, immunity, and infection dynamics are rare, particularly in migratory animals. Here, we experimentally tested how ALAN affects cellular immunity and haemosporidian parasite intensity across the annual cycle of migrant and resident subspecies of the dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis). We monitored an experimental group exposed to light at night and a control group under natural light/dark cycles as they passed through short days simulating early spring to longer days simulating the breeding season, followed by autumn migration. Using generalized additive mixed models, we show that ALAN increased inflammation, and leucocyte counts were greatest in early spring and autumn. At the start of the experiment, few birds had active infections based on microscopy, but PCR revealed many birds had chronic infections. ALAN increased parasitaemia across the annual cycle, with strong peaks in spring and autumn that were largely absent in control birds. As birds were kept in indoor aviaries to prevent vector exposure, this increased parasitaemia indicates relapse of chronic infection during costly life-history stages (i.e. reproduction). Although the immunological and parasitological time series were in phase for control birds, cross-correlation analyses also revealed ALAN desynchronized leucocyte profiles and parasitaemia, which could suggest a general exaggerated inflammatory response. Our study shows how a common anthropogenic influence can shape within-host processes to affect infection dynamics.  
  Address Environmental Resilience Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; danbeck ( at ) iu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32962545; PMCID:PMC7542808 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3368  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Winger, B.M.; Weeks, B.C.; Farnsworth, A.; Jones, A.W.; Hennen, M.; Willard, D.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal flight-calling behaviour predicts vulnerability to artificial light in migratory birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 286 Issue 1900 Pages 20190364  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract Understanding interactions between biota and the built environment is increasingly important as human modification of the landscape expands in extent and intensity. For migratory birds, collisions with lighted structures are a major cause of mortality, but the mechanisms behind these collisions are poorly understood. Using 40 years of collision records of passerine birds, we investigated the importance of species' behavioural ecologies in predicting rates of building collisions during nocturnal migration through Chicago, IL and Cleveland, OH, USA. We found that the use of nocturnal flight calls is an important predictor of collision risk in nocturnally migrating passerine birds. Species that produce flight calls during nocturnal migration tended to collide with buildings more than expected given their local abundance, whereas those that do not use such communication collided much less frequently. Our results suggest that a stronger attraction response to artificial light at night in species that produce flight calls may mediate these differences in collision rates. Nocturnal flight calls probably evolved to facilitate collective decision-making during navigation, but this same social behaviour may now exacerbate vulnerability to a widespread anthropogenic disturbance. Our results also suggest that social behaviour during migration may reflect poorly understood differences in navigational mechanisms across lineages of birds.  
  Address 4 Gantz Family Collections Center, The Field Museum , 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 , USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30940055 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2287  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ulgezen, Z.N.; Kapyla, T.; Meerlo, P.; Spoelstra, K.; Visser, M.E.; Dominoni, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The preference and costs of sleeping under light at night in forest and urban great tits Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 286 Issue 1905 Pages 20190872  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasing phenomenon associated with worldwide urbanization. In birds, broad-spectrum white ALAN can have disruptive effects on activity patterns, metabolism, stress response and immune function. There has been growing research on whether the use of alternative light spectra can reduce these negative effects, but surprisingly, there has been no study to determine which light spectrum birds prefer. To test such a preference, we gave urban and forest great tits (Parus major) the choice where to roost using pairwise combinations of darkness, white light or green dim light at night (1.5 lux). Birds preferred to sleep under artificial light instead of darkness, and green was preferred over white light. In a subsequent experiment, we investigated the consequence of sleeping under a particular light condition, and measured birds' daily activity levels, daily energy expenditure (DEE), oxalic acid as a biomarker for sleep debt and cognitive abilities. White light affected activity patterns more than green light. Moreover, there was an origin-dependent response to spectral composition: in urban birds, the total daily activity and night activity did not differ between white and green light, while forest birds were more active under white than green light. We also found that individuals who slept under white and green light had higher DEE. However, there were no differences in oxalic acid levels or cognitive abilities between light treatments. Thus, we argue that in naive birds that had never encountered light at night, white light might disrupt circadian rhythms more than green light. However, it is possible that the negative effects of ALAN on sleep and cognition might be observed only under intensities higher than 1.5 lux. These results suggest that reducing the intensity of light pollution as well as tuning the spectrum towards long wavelengths may considerably reduce its impact.  
  Address 5 Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow , Glasgow , UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31213184; PMCID:PMC6599990 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2557  
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