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Author Hoffmann, J.; Palme, R.; Eccard, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Long-term dim light during nighttime changes activity patterns and space use in experimental small mammal populations Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume (down) 238 Issue Pages 844-851  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is spreading worldwide and thereby is increasingly interfering with natural dark-light cycles. Meanwhile, effects of very low intensities of light pollution on animals have rarely been investigated. We explored the effects of low intensity ALAN over seven months in eight experimental bank vole (Myodes glareolus) populations in large grassland enclosures over winter and early breeding season, using LED garden lamps. Initial populations consisted of eight individuals (32 animals per hectare) in enclosures with or without ALAN. We found that bank voles under ALAN experienced changes in daily activity patterns and space use behavior, measured by automated radiotelemetry. There were no differences in survival and body mass, measured with live trapping, and none in levels of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites. Voles in the ALAN treatment showed higher activity at night during half moon, and had larger day ranges during new moon. Thus, even low levels of light pollution as experienced in remote areas or by sky glow can lead to changes in animal behavior and could have consequences for species interactions.  
  Address Animal Ecology, University of Potsdam, Maulbeerallee 1, 14469, Potsdam, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29627754 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1848  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Haddock, J.K.; Threlfall, C.G.; Law, B.; Hochuli, D.F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution at the urban forest edge negatively impacts insectivorous bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 236 Issue Pages 17-28  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Connectivity and quality of vegetation in cities, including urban forests, can promote urban biodiversity. However the impact of anthropogenic pressures at the forest-matrix edge, particularly artificial light at night (ALAN), on connectivity has received little attention. We assessed the influence of artificial light at forest edges on insectivorous bats. We acoustically surveyed 31 forest edges across greater Sydney, Australia, half with mercury vapour streetlights and half in ambient darkness, and compared the bat assemblage and activity levels to urban forest interiors. We also sampled the flying insect community to establish whether changes in insect densities under lights drive changes in insectivorous bat activity. We recorded 9965 bat passes from 16 species or species groups throughout our acoustic survey. The activity of all bats, and bats hypothesised to be sensitive to artificial light, was consistently higher in forest interiors as opposed to edges. We found that slower flying bats adapted to cluttered vegetation or with a relatively high characteristic echolocation call frequency; Chalinolobus morio, Miniopterus australis, Vespadelus vulturnus, and Nyctophilus spp., were negatively affected by artificial light sources at the forest edge. The emergence time of Vespadelus vulturnus was also significantly delayed by the presence of streetlights at the forest edge. Conversely, generalist faster flying bats; Chalinolobus gouldii, Ozimops ridei, Austronomous australis, Saccolaimus flaviventris, and Miniopterus orianae oceanensis, were unaffected by artificial light at the edge of urban forest, and used light and dark forest edges in a similar way. Insect surveys showed that larger lepidopterans seemed to be attracted to lit areas, but in low numbers. Artificial light sources on the edges of urban forest have diverse effects on bats and insects, and should be considered an anthropogenic edge effect that can reduce available habitat and decrease connectivity for light-sensitive species.  
  Address  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2505  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kotarba, A.Z.; Chacewicz, S.; Żmudzka, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night sky photometry over Warsaw (Poland) evaluated simultaneously with surface-based and satellite-based cloud observations Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume (down) 235 Issue Pages 95-107  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Light pollution is a widely distributed form of anthropogenic pollution that threatens both biodiversity and human health. One of the most popular indicators is known as night sky brightness (NSB), measured with photometric techniques. In the study, we report results of the very first, long-term photometric survey of NSB over Poland's capital, Warsaw, for 636 nights between 2014 and 2016 using a sky quality meter (SQM). Data were collected for all-weather conditions and, for the first time, we simultaneously use two independent sources of cloud amount data: surface-based (SYNOP) and satellite-based (Meteosat/SEVIRI). Results show that Warsaw is significantly polluted by light, with average NSB of 18.65 ± 0.06 magSQM/arcsec2 (15 times higher than unpolluted sky). Zenithal NSB is almost unaffected by moonlight. During astronomical nights, cloud cover was the dominant determinant of NSB, increasing by 7 times for overcast sky. In general, the sky brightened by ∼0.2 magSQM/arcsec2 for each 10% increase in cloud fraction. Satellite-based cloud amount data was found to be a very reliable alternative to traditional SYNOP observations. No statistically significant difference was found for average NSB calculated using satellite and SYNOP datasets. This finding is of particular importance, since the coverage of surface-based data is limited, while satellite observations can be obtained for any location on Earth, and collocate with any NSB photometric station. Our investigation also highlighted that SYNOP data are unreliable when cloud amount is low. This is due to the different fields of view for SQM (20°) and SYNOP (180°) observations of broken cloud.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2580  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Rebke, M.; Dierschke, V.; Weiner, C.N.; Aumüller, R.; Hill, K.; Hill, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Attraction of nocturnally migrating birds to artificial light: The influence of colour, intensity and blinking mode under different cloud cover conditions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 233 Issue Pages 220-227  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A growing number of offshore wind farms have led to a tremendous increase in artificial lighting in the marine environment. This study disentangles the connection of light characteristics, which potentially influence the reaction of nocturnally migrating passerines to artificial illumination under different cloud cover conditions. In a spotlight experiment on a North Sea island, birds were exposed to combinations of light colour (red, yellow, green, blue, white), intensity (half, full) and blinking mode (intermittent, continuous) while measuring their number close to the light source with thermal imaging cameras.

We found that no light variant was constantly avoided by nocturnally migrating passerines crossing the sea. The number of birds did neither differ between observation periods with blinking light of different colours nor compared to darkness. While intensity did not influence the number attracted, birds were drawn more towards continuous than towards blinking illumination, when stars were not visible. Red continuous light was the only exception that did not differ from the blinking counterpart. Continuous green, blue and white light attracted significantly more birds than continuous red light in overcast situations.

Our results suggest that light sources offshore should be restricted to a minimum, but if lighting is needed, blinking light is to be preferred over continuous light, and if continuous light is required, red light should be applied.
 
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2255  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Coulthard, E.; Norrey, J.; Shortall, C.; Harris, W.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ecological traits predict population changes in moths Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation  
  Volume (down) 233 Issue Pages 213-219  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Understanding the ecological traits which predispose species to local or global extinction allows for more effective pre-emptive conservation management interventions. Insect population declines are a major facet of the global biodiversity crisis, yet even in Europe they remain poorly understood. Here we identify traits linked to population trends in ‘common and widespread’ UK moths. Population trend data from the Rothamsted Research Insect Survey spanning 40 years was subject to classification and regression models to identify common traits among species experiencing a significant change in occurrence. Our final model had an accuracy of 76% and managed to predict declining species on 90% of occasions, but was less successful with increasing species. By far the most powerful predictor associated for declines was moth wingspan with large species declining more frequently. Preference for woody or herbaceous larval food sources, nocturnal photoperiod activity, and richness of habitats occupied also proved to be significantly associated with decline. Our results suggest that ecological traits can be reliably used to predict declines in moths, and that this model could be used for Data Deficient species, of which there are many.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2260  
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