|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Molcan, L.; Sutovska, H.; Okuliarova, M.; Senko, T.; Krskova, L.; Zeman, M.
Title Dim light at night attenuates circadian rhythms in the cardiovascular system and suppresses melatonin in rats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci
Volume (down) 231 Issue Pages 116568
Keywords Animals
Abstract AIMS: Cardiovascular parameters exhibit significant 24-h variability, which is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and light/dark cycles control SCN activity. We aimed to study the effects of light at night (ALAN; 1-2lx) on cardiovascular system control in normotensive rats. MAIN METHODS: Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured by telemetry during five weeks of ALAN exposure. From beat-to-beat telemetry data, we evaluated spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (sBRS). After 2 (A2) and 5 (A5) weeks of ALAN, plasma melatonin concentrations and the response of BP and HR to norepinephrine administration were measured. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and endothelin-1 was determined in the aorta. Spontaneous exploratory behaviour was evaluated in an open-field test. KEY FINDINGS: ALAN significantly suppressed the 24-h variability in the HR, BP, and sBRS after A2, although the parameters were partially restored after A5. The daily variability in the BP response to norepinephrine was reduced after A2 and restored after A5. ALAN increased the BP response to norepinephrine compared to the control after A5. Increased eNOS expression was found in arteries after A2 but not A5. Endothelin-1 expression was not affected by ALAN. Plasma melatonin levels were suppressed after A2 and A5. Spontaneous exploratory behaviour was reduced. SIGNIFICANCE: ALAN decreased plasma melatonin and the 24-h variability in the haemodynamic parameters and increased the BP response to norepinephrine. A low intensity ALAN can suppress circadian control of the cardiovascular system with negative consequences on the anticipation of a load.
Address Department of Animal Physiology and Ethology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31202842 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2548
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Russart, K.L.G.; Chbeir, S.A.; Nelson, R.J.; Magalang, U.J.
Title Light at night exacerbates metabolic dysfunction in a polygenic mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci
Volume (down) 231 Issue Pages 116574
Keywords Animals; diabetes; human health; mouse models; Type 2 diabetes; Insulin Resistance
Abstract AIMS: Electric lighting is beneficial to modern society; however, it is becoming apparent that light at night (LAN) is not without biological consequences. Several studies have reported negative effects of LAN on health and behavior in humans and nonhuman animals. Exposure of non-diabetic mice to dim LAN impairs glucose tolerance, whereas a return to dark nights (LD) reverses this impairment. We predicted that exposure to LAN would exacerbate the metabolic abnormalities in TALLYHO/JngJ (TH) mice, a polygenic model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We exposed 7-week old male TH mice to either LD or LAN for 8-10weeks in two separate experiments. After 8weeks of light treatment, we conducted intraperitoneal glucose tolerance testing (ipGTT) followed by intraperitoneal insulin tolerance testing (ipITT). In Experiment 1, all mice were returned to LD for 4weeks, and ipITT was repeated. KEY FINDINGS: The major results of this study are i) LAN exposure for 8weeks exacerbates glucose intolerance and insulin resistance ii) the effects of LAN on insulin resistance are reversed upon return to LD, iii) LAN exposure results in a greater increase in body weight compared to LD exposure, iv) LAN increases the incidence of mice developing overt T2DM, and v) LAN exposure decreases survival of mice with T2DM. SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, LAN exacerbated metabolic abnormalities in a polygenic mouse model of T2DM, and these effects were reversed upon return to dark nights. The applicability of these findings to humans with T2DM needs to be determined.
Address Department of Neuroscience, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31207311 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2549
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brady, A.; Willis, B.; Harder, L.; Vizel, P.
Title Lunar Phase Modulates Circadian Gene Expression Cycles in the Broadcast Spawning Coral Acropora millepora Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Biological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Biol Bullet
Volume (down) 230 Issue 2 Pages 130-142
Keywords Animals; corals; Acropora millepora; lunar cycle; Circadian Rhythm; gene expression; moon
Abstract Many broadcast spawning corals in multiple reef regions release their gametes with incredible temporal precision just once per year, using the lunar cycle to set the night of spawning. Moonlight, rather than tides or other lunar-regulated processes, is thought to be the proximate factor responsible for linking the night of spawning to the phase of the Moon. We compared patterns of gene expression among colonies of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora at different phases of the lunar cycle, and when they were maintained under one of three experimentally simulated lunar lighting treatments: i) lunar lighting conditions matching those on the reef, or lunar patterns mimicking either ii) constant full Moon conditions, or iii) constant new Moon conditions. Normal lunar illumination was found to shift both the level and timing of clock gene transcription cycles between new and full moons, with the peak hour of expression for a number of genes occurring earlier in the evening under a new Moon when compared to a full Moon. When the normal lunar cycle is replaced with nighttime patterns equivalent to either a full Moon or a new Moon every evening, the normal monthlong changes in the level of expression are destroyed for most genes. In combination, these results indicate that daily changes in moonlight that occur over the lunar cycle are essential for maintaining normal lunar periodicity of clock gene transcription, and this may play a role in regulating spawn timing. These data also show that low levels of light pollution may have an impact on coral biological clocks.
Address Department of Biological Science, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada; pvize(at)ucalgary.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Marine Biological Laboratory Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1476
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Hines, C.W.; Fang, Y.; Chan, V.K.S.; Stiller, K.T.; Brauner, C.J.; Richards, J.G.
Title The effect of salinity and photoperiod on thermal tolerance of Atlantic and coho salmon reared from smolt to adult in recirculating aquaculture systems Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol
Volume (down) 230 Issue Pages 1-6
Keywords Animals
Abstract Land-based, closed containment salmon aquaculture involves rearing salmon from smolt to adult in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). Unlike in open-net pen aquaculture, rearing conditions can be specified in RAS in order to optimize growth and physiological stress tolerance. The environmental conditions that yield optimal stress tolerance in salmon are, however, unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we reared Atlantic (Salmo salar) and coho (Oncorhynchus kisutch) salmon in 7 separate RASs for 400days post-smoltification under 2 photoperiods (24:0 or 12:12, light:dark) and 4 salinities (2.5, 5, 10 or 30ppt.) and assessed the effects of these conditions on thermal tolerance. We found that over the first 120days post-smoltification, rearing coho under a 24:0 photoperiod resulted in a ~2 degrees C lower critical thermal maxima (CTmax) than in coho reared under a 12:12 photoperiod. This photoperiod effect did not persist at 200 and 400days, which was coincident with an overall decrease in CTmax in coho. Finally, Atlantic salmon had a higher CTmax (~28 degrees C) compared to coho (~26 degrees C) at 400days post-smoltification. Overall, these findings are important for the future implications of RAS and for the aquaculture industry to help identify physiologically sensitive time stages.
Address Department of Zoology, The University of British Columbia, 6270 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30590111 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2149
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Min, J.-young; Min, K.-bok
Title Outdoor light at night and the prevalence of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors: a cross-sectional study in a nationally representative sample of Korean adults Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal Journal of Affective Disorders
Volume (down) 227 Issue Pages 199-205
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Background

Outdoor light at night (LAN) is an increasingly prevalent type of environmental pollution. Studies have demonstrated that outdoor LAN can disrupt circadian rhythms, potentially contributing to insomnia, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic changes in humans. We investigated the association of outdoor LAN with depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors in South Korean adults.

Methods

This study used data from the 2009 Korean Community Health Survey, a representative sample dataset. Study population consisted of 113,119 participants for the assessment of depressive symptoms and 152,159 participants for the assessment of suicidal behavior. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Korean version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (depressive symptoms, score of > 16). Suicidal behaviors were defined as the experience of suicidal ideation or attempt. Outdoor LAN was estimated by satellite data from the National Centers for Environmental Information.

Results

Participants with depressive symptoms or history of suicidal behaviors were more likely to have exposure to outdoor LAN than those without depressive symptoms or suicidal behaviors. Compared with adults living in areas exposed to the lowest outdoor LAN, those living in areas exposed to the highest levels had higher likelihood depressive symptoms (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.15–1.46) or suicidal behaviors (OR = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.16–1.39). Significant dose-response relationships were observed between outdoor LAN and the odds of depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors.

Conclusion

Outdoor LAN was found to be significantly associated with depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviors, suggesting that it may be an environmental contributor to mental health problems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1777
Permanent link to this record