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Author Kernbach, M.E.; Newhouse, D.J.; Miller, J.M.; Hall, R.J.; Gibbons, J.; Oberstaller, J.; Selechnik, D.; Jiang, R.H.Y.; Unnasch, T.R.; Balakrishnan, C.N.; Martin, L.B.
Title Light pollution increases West Nile virus competence of a ubiquitous passerine reservoir species Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume (down) 286 Issue 1907 Pages 20191051
Keywords Animals; Human Health; anthropogenic; ecoimmunology; host competence; light pollution; reservoir host
Abstract Among the many anthropogenic changes that impact humans and wildlife, one of the most pervasive but least understood is light pollution. Although detrimental physiological and behavioural effects resulting from exposure to light at night are widely appreciated, the impacts of light pollution on infectious disease risk have not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that artificial light at night (ALAN) extends the infectious-to-vector period of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), an urban-dwelling avian reservoir host of West Nile virus (WNV). Sparrows exposed to ALAN maintained transmissible viral titres for 2 days longer than controls but did not experience greater WNV-induced mortality during this window. Transcriptionally, ALAN altered the expression of gene regulatory networks including key hubs (OASL, PLBD1 and TRAP1) and effector genes known to affect WNV dissemination (SOCS). Despite mounting anti-viral immune responses earlier, transcriptomic signatures indicated that ALAN-exposed individuals probably experienced pathogen-induced damage and immunopathology, potentially due to evasion of immune effectors. A simple mathematical modelling exercise indicated that ALAN-induced increases of host infectious-to-vector period could increase WNV outbreak potential by approximately 41%. ALAN probably affects other host and vector traits relevant to transmission, and additional research is needed to advise the management of zoonotic diseases in light-polluted areas.
Address Center for Global Health Infectious Disease Research, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA
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ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31337318; PMCID:PMC6661335 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2611
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Author Bullock, B.; McGlashan, E.M.; Burns, A.C.; Lu, B.S.; Cain, S.W.
Title Traits related to bipolar disorder are associated with an increased post-illumination pupil response Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Psychiatry Research Abbreviated Journal Psychiatry Res
Volume (down) 278 Issue Pages 35-41
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Mood states in bipolar disorder appear to be closely linked to changes in sleep and circadian function. It has been suggested that hypersensitivity of the circadian system to light may be a trait vulnerability for bipolar disorder. Healthy persons with emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder also appear to exhibit problems with circadian rhythms, which may be associated with individual differences in light sensitivity. This study investigated the melanopsin-driven post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) in relation to emotional-behavioural traits associated with bipolar disorder (measured with the General Behavior Inventory) in a non-clinical group (n=61). An increased PIPR was associated with increased bipolar disorder-related traits. Specifically, the hypomania scale of the General Behavior Inventory was associated with an increased post-blue PIPR. Further, both the full hypomania and shortened '7 Up' scales were significantly predicted by PIPR, after age, sex and depressive traits were controlled. These findings suggest that increased sensitivity to light may be a risk factor for mood problems in the general population, and support the idea that hypersensitivity to light is a trait vulnerability for, rather than symptom of, bipolar disorder.
Address School of Psychological Sciences and Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: sean.cain@monash.edu
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0165-1781 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31136914 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2510
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Author Ye, Y.; Xue, X.; Huang, L.; Gan, M.; Tong, C.; Wang, K.; Deng, J.
Title A new perspective to map the supply and demand of artificial night light based on Loujia1-01 and urban big data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume (down) 276 Issue Pages 123244
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The notable increase in artificial night light (ANL) induced by the rapid urbanization process has been widely studied, but a deep understanding of the supply and demand status of ANL is still lacking. This paper attempts to map the supply and demand of ANL from the human perspective by using advanced Loujia1-01 nighttime imagery and social media derived population density (PD) data, which provides a new tool for light regulation in urban management. The bivariate clustering based k-means algorithm and template matching technique are integrated to delineate mismatch regions at the block scale to further analyze the underlying reason for unbalanced status. The results showed that the high supply but low demand (HSLD) ANL status was the leading component in the mismatch regions, occupying more than 650,000 ha and mainly occurring in the city center. The HSLD proportion was considerable in terms of public services (44%), commercial (40%), industrial (39%), transportation (56%), and green space areas (53%). Moreover, the HSLD area notably increased 946 ha over time from 18:00 to 22:00. The measurements for validation obtained by field investigation showed highly linear relationship with ANL (R2 = 0.75) and PD (R2 = 0.62), and the mapping results were consistent with the actual conditions. This study reveals the highly unbalanced ANL status, and appeals to planners for the establishment of optimal lighting regulations to alleviate disruptive effects.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3070
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Author Zhang, W.; Cui, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, C.; Streets, D.G.
Title How does urbanization affect CO2 emissions of central heating systems in China? An assessment of natural gas transition policy based on nighttime light data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume (down) 276 Issue Pages 123188
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Understanding the different impacts of urbanization on sectorial carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at different spatial scales is of great importance for the evaluation of energy transition policies and reduction of environmental inequality. However, how urbanization affects the CO2 emissions of central heating systems at high spatial resolution in China has not been fully studied before. Based on satellite-observed NPP-VIIRS nighttime light (NTL) data, we develop a 5 km × 5 km annual CO2 emission inventory for coal boilers, thermal power plants (TPPs), and natural gas boilers in China’s central heating systems for the period 2012–2017 by using the geographical and temporally weighted regression (GTWR) model. It is observed that nonurban areas generated 2–4 times the CO2 emissions of coal boilers in urban areas. The largest increments of CO2 emissions of gas boilers are observed in urban areas of the eastern (6.80 times) and central regions (2.86 times) in 2013–2014, due to the clean heating policy in the “2 + 26” cities in China. The effects of urbanization on CO2 emissions from natural gas boilers are approximately 2–3 times those of coal boilers, and the differences are largest in western cities with only minor differences in northeastern cities. Our results will aid in designing low-carbon development goals and provide micro-level information on central heating facilities in urbanized and less developed regions.
Address
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3072
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Author Peregrym, M.; Penzesne Konya, E.; Falchi, F.
Title Very important dark sky areas in Europe and the Caucasus region Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Environmental Management Abbreviated Journal J Environ Manage
Volume (down) 274 Issue Pages 111167
Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Alan; Caucasus; Europe; Light pollution; Protected areas; Very important dark area
Abstract ALAN (artificial light at night) can give, if done adequately, a lot of benefits for human society, but it affects reproduction, navigation, foraging, habitat selection, communication, trophic and social interactions of the biota in the same time. Taking into account dramatic increase in light pollution of the night sky and night environment during the past decades, the creation of refugia where natural habitats are not influenced by ALAN is very important. We selected promising territories without, or with a low impact of, ALAN for the development of a VIDA (Very Important Dark Area) Network in Europe and the Caucasus region. 54 VIDAs within the borders of 30 countries were chosen, located in different biogeographic regions, at different altitudes, and in juxtaposition with protected areas. Special attention has been paid to sea and ocean islands, non-polluted by ALAN, as well as to large parts of European Russia and Kazakhstan where there is still a low level of light pollution. These places might be a basis for the protection of biodiversity from the consequences of ALAN, and they can also serve as key education centers for increasing the awareness of the problem of light pollution of the sky at night. Due to the fact that light propagates far away in the atmosphere, the protection of VIDAs can be obtained only if a strong anti-light pollution action is enforced also in the surrounding areas, at least 100 km from the borders of the VIDAs.
Address Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dell'Inquinamento Luminoso (Light Pollution Science and Technology Institute), 36016, Thiene, Italy; Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0301-4797 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32791325 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3074
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