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Author Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Kurumatani, N.
Title Obayashi et al. Respond to “Light at Night Predicts Depression—What Next?” Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication American Journal of Epidemiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 187 Issue 3 Pages 439-440
Keywords Commentary; Human Health
Abstract Our research includes some strengths and limitations. The most important strength is objective measurement of light at night (LAN) intensity using a bedside light meter. Most previous studies evaluating the association between LAN and health outcomes have assessed indoor LAN levels using a self-reported questionnaire or outdoor LAN levels using satellite data; however, self-reported indoor LAN levels has not yet been validated with objective measurement and outdoor LAN levels are surrogates for an individual LAN exposure. The second strength of our study includes its longitudinal design using multivariable methods to adjust for confounders, which indicated LAN exposure may be a cause of the incidence of depressive symptoms. Indeed, the depressive score evaluated by questionnaires may be above or below the cut-off value over the short term; therefore, a long-term study considering such unstable outcomes should be conducted. In the current study, LAN exposure was measured for only two nights; thus, an amplitude of LAN intensity has been focused. However, multiple measurements over time in the future study would allow an analysis of fluctuations in LAN exposure, which might be important for circadian physiology.
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ISSN 0002-9262 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1717
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Author Shi, K.; Chen, Y.; Yu, B.; Xu, T.; Yang, C.; Li, L.; Huang, C.; Chen, Z.; Liu, R.; Wu, J.
Title Detecting spatiotemporal dynamics of global electric power consumption using DMSP-OLS nighttime stable light data Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Applied Energy Abbreviated Journal Applied Energy
Volume (down) 184 Issue Pages 450-463
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The rapid development of global industrialization and urbanization has resulted in a great deal of electric power consumption (EPC), which is closely related to economic growth, carbon emissions, and the long-term stability of global climate. This study attempts to detect spatiotemporal dynamics of global EPC using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime stable light (NSL) data. The global NSL data from 1992 to 2013 were intercalibrated via a modified invariant region (MIR) method. The global EPC at 1 km resolution was then modeled using the intercalibrated NSL data to assess spatiotemporal dynamics of EPC from a global scale down to continental and national scales. The results showed that the MIR method not only reduced the saturated lighted pixels, but also improved the continuity and comparability of the NSL data. An accuracy assessment was undertaken and confined that the intercalibrated NSL data were relatively suitable and accurate for estimating EPC in the world. Spatiotemporal variations of EPC were mainly identified in Europe, North America, and Asia. Special attention should be paid to China where the high grade and high-growth type of EPC covered 0.409% and 1.041% of the total country area during the study period, respectively. The results of this study greatly enhance the understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of global EPC at the multiple scales. They will provide a scientific evidence base for tracking spatiotemporal dynamics of global EPC.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-2619 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2486
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Author Pauwels, J.; Le Viol, I.; Azam, C.; Valet, N.; Julien, J.-F.; Bas, Y.; Lemarchand, C.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kerbiriou, C.
Title Accounting for artificial light impact on bat activity for a biodiversity-friendly urban planning Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume (down) 183 Issue Pages 12-25
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing
Abstract Light pollution constitutes a major threat to biodiversity by decreasing habitat quality and landscape connectivity for nocturnal species. While there is an increasing consideration of biodiversity in urban management policies, the impact of artificial light is poorly accounted for. This is in a large part due to the lack of quantitative information and relevant guidelines to limit its negative effects. Here we compared the potential of two sources of information on light pollution, remote sensing (nocturnal picture taken from the International Space Station ISS) and ground-based (location of streetlights) data, to measure its impact on bats. Our aims were to (i) evaluate how light pollution affected Pipistrellus pipistrellus activity at the city scale, (ii) determine which source of information was the most relevant to measure light pollution’s effect and (iii) define a reproducible methodology applicable in land management to account for biodiversity in lighting planning. We used citizen science data to model the activity of P. pipistrellus, a species considered light tolerant, within three cities of France while accounting for artificial light through a variable based on either source of information. We showed that at the city scale, P. pipistrellus activity is negatively impacted by light pollution irrespective of the light variable used. This detrimental effect was better described by variables based on ISS pictures than on streetlights location. Our methodology can be easily reproduced and used in urban planning to help take the impact of light pollution into consideration and promote a biodiversity-friendly management of artificial light.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2118
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Author Willis, G.L.; Freelance, C.B.
Title The effect of directed photic stimulation of the pineal on experimental Parkinson's disease Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav
Volume (down) 182 Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords Animals
Abstract The role of the circadian system in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. This has emerged from recent studies demonstrating an altered response of PD patients to treatment in relation to the phase of the light/dark cycle and from other work defining the functional significance of melanocytes in PD: a cell type that the nigro-striatal dopamine (NSD) system and circadian system both contain. The present study was undertaken to determine the sensitivity of the pineal, as the final common pathway of the circadian system, to light delivered directly to the pineal via surgical implantation of LEDs. Direct photic stimulation of the pineal altered the course of experimental PD while anatomical controls receiving stimulation of the frontal cortex exhibited a negative impact on the course of recovery of these animals. These effects were closely linked to the phase of the light/dark cycle. The present results suggest that while pineal photoreceptors are regarded as vestigial, functional photo-reactivity of the pineal remains. It is inferred that melanocytes are the active cells responsible for the observed effect since they remain functionally intact in mammalian pineal even though pineal photoreceptors are functionally inert. Although the stimuli applied in the present study may be regarded as artificial this study demonstrates that brain parenchyma remains differentially reactive to direct light exposure and presents a novel mechanism in circadian structures that needs to be explored.
Address The Bronowski Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience, Coliban Medical Centre, 19 Jennings Street, Kyneton, Victoria 3444, Australia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28919247 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1732
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Author Zamorano, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Ocaña, F.; Pila-Diez, B.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Pascual, S.; Tapia, C.; Gallego, J.; Fernandez, A.; Nievas, M.
Title Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: a dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal JQSRT
Volume (down) 181 Issue Pages 52-66
Keywords Skyglow; measurements; light pollution; artificial light at night; modeling; Madrid; Spain
Abstract We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the center of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are neccessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population, and ii) that the orography of the region should be taken into account when deriving geo-specific models from general first-principles models. We show the tight relationship between these two luminance measures. This finding sets up an alternative roadmap to extended studies over the globe that will not require the local deployment of photometers or trained personnel.
Address Dept. Astrof´ısica y CC. de la Atm´osfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1323
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