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Author Zhang, W.; Jiang, L.; Cui, Y.; Xu, Y.; Wang, C.; Yu, J.; Streets, D.G.; Lin, B.
Title Effects of urbanization on airport CO2 emissions: A geographically weighted approach using nighttime light data in China Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Resources, Conservation and Recycling Abbreviated Journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling
Volume (down) 150 Issue Pages 104454
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Regional disparities in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from airports at the city level are of increasing importance for low-carbon development of the civil aviation sector. However, CO2 emissions from airport operations have rarely been estimated and discussed. We investigate the main driving forces of airport CO2 emissions by using Ordinary Least Square (OLS) and Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) models, separately, to investigate whether urbanization drives airport CO2 emissions and to investigate spatial heterogeneity at the city level. Nighttime light (NTL) data from satellite observations are adopted as a proxy for urbanization. We obtained energy consumption data by end-use purpose for 70 airports in China and calculated the CO2 emissions from on-ground airport operations. The median CO2 emissions of the 70 sample airports are estimated to be 15.9 million tonnes for 2015. Results from the GWR model indicate that airport CO2 emissions are affected by five main factors: urbanization, foreign direct investment, the share of tertiary industry in gross domestic output, passenger turnover of civil aviation and passenger turnover of railways. The elasticity of urbanization shows an increasing trend from the east of China to the west. The spatial heterogeneity of the CO2 emissions of the five airport clusters that are located in five urban agglomerations is discussed. In order to achieve effective reductions of CO2 emissions from airports, policy-makers should consider the spatial heterogeneity of the major driving factors of carbon emissions in different regions to avoid carbon lock-in.
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ISSN 0921-3449 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2657
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Author Edison, T.A.
Title The dangers of electric lighting Type Journal Article
Year 1889 Publication The North American Review Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 149 Issue 396 Pages 625-634
Keywords Public Safety
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2377
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Author Richter, A.; Ng, K.T.W.; Karimi, N.
Title A data driven technique applying GIS, and remote sensing to rank locations for waste disposal site expansion Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Resources, Conservation and Recycling Abbreviated Journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling
Volume (down) 149 Issue Pages 352-362
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Landfilling is the most common method for final treatment of municipal solid waste worldwide. Canadians generated 973 kg/cap of waste in 2016, and 73% of that was sent to landfills or incinerators. This study proposes a novel method which combines remote sensing and vector data to rank the suitability of current landfill sites and their area of influence for expansion in Saskatchewan, Canada; where there are currently more than 500 active landfills. This study found that using average normalized data, 55.3% of the land in the study area was suitable or moderately suitable for landfill expansion while 45% of the area was unsuitable for landfill expansion. Polygon 32, an area dominated by agriculture and pasture land, is the most suitable for landfill expansion based on the mean normalized rank and was ranked 9th (out of 39) in terms of standard deviation. Polygon 27 is the least suitable for landfill expansion, having the largest mean normalized rank, and was ranked 38th (out of 39) in terms of standard deviation. This method is advantageous compared to other decision-making tools which rely on expert opinion. This method relies solely on remote sensing and vector data; but is flexible enough that weighting of data sets can be applied by policy makers if so desired. Results show that using remote sensing data and vector data together are capable of capturing distinctly different aspects of the study area, and that vector data can be used as a proxy for imagery where cloud cover is present.
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ISSN 0921-3449 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2582
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Author Shinobu Yasuo, Ayaka Iwamoto, Sang-il Lee, Shotaro Ochiai, Rina Hitachi, Satomi Shibata, Nobuo Uotsu, Chie Tarumizu, Sayuri Matsuoka, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shigekazu Higuchi
Title L-Serine Enhances Light-Induced Circadian Phase Resetting in Mice and Humans Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Nutrition Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 147 Issue 12 Pages 2347-2355
Keywords Animals; Human Health
Abstract Background: The circadian clock is modulated by the timing of ingestion or food composition, but the effects of specific nutrients are poorly understood.

Objective: We aimed to identify the amino acids that modulate the circadian clock and reset the light-induced circadian phase in mice and humans.

Methods: Male CBA/N mice were orally administered 1 of 20 L-amino acids, and the circadian and light-induced phase shifts of wheel-running activity were analyzed. Antagonists of several neurotransmitter pathways were injected before L-serine administration, and light-induced phase shifts were analyzed. In addition, the effect of L-serine on the light-induced phase advance was investigated in healthy male students (mean ± SD age 22.2 ± 1.8 y) by using dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) determined by saliva samples as an index of the circadian phase.

Results: L-Serine administration enhanced light-induced phase shifts in mice (1.86-fold; P < 0.05). Both L-serine and its metabolite D-serine, a coagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, exerted this effect, but D-serine concentrations in the hypothalamus did not increase after L-serine administration. The effect of L-serine was blocked by picrotoxin, an antagonist of &#947;-aminobutyric acid A receptors, but not by MK801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. L-Serine administration altered the long-term expression patterns of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. After advancing the light-dark cycle by 6 h, L-serine administration slightly accelerated re-entrainment to the shifted cycle. In humans, L-serine ingestion before bedtime induced significantly larger phase advances of DLMO after bright-light exposure during the morning (means ± SEMs—L-serine: 25.9 ± 6.6 min; placebo: 12.1 ± 7.0 min; P < 0.05).

Conclusion: These results suggest that L-serine enhances light-induced phase resetting in mice and humans, and it may be useful for treating circadian disturbances.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1784
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Author O'Connor, J.J.; Fobert, E.K.; Besson, M.; Jacob, H.; Lecchini, D.
Title Live fast, die young: Behavioural and physiological impacts of light pollution on a marine fish during larval recruitment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume (down) 146 Issue Pages 908-914
Keywords Animals; Ecosystem; Environmental Pollution/adverse effects; Fishes/growth & development/*physiology; Larva/growth & development/physiology/*radiation effects; Light/*adverse effects; Metamorphosis, Biological/radiation effects; Predatory Behavior/radiation effects; Coral reefs; Fish larvae; Light pollution; Metamorphosis; Recruitment
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a recently acknowledged form of anthropogenic pollution of growing concern to the biology and ecology of exposed organisms. Though ALAN can have detrimental effects on physiology and behaviour, we have little understanding of how marine organisms in coastal areas may be impacted. Here, we investigated the effects of ALAN exposure on coral reef fish larvae during the critical recruitment stage, encompassing settlement, metamorphosis, and post-settlement survival. We found that larvae avoided illuminated settlement habitats, however those living under ALAN conditions for 10days post-settlement experienced changes in swimming behaviour and higher susceptibility to nocturnal predation. Although ALAN-exposed fish grew faster and heavier than control fish, they also experienced significantly higher mortality rates by the end of the experimental period. This is the first study on the ecological impacts of ALAN during the early life history of marine fish.
Address Institute for Pacific Coral Reefs, IRCP, 98729, Moorea, French Polynesia; PSL Research University: EPHE-UPVD-CNRS, USR3278 CRIOBE, BP 1013, 98729 Papetoai, Moorea, French Polynesia; Laboratoire d'Excellence “CORAIL”, Moorea, French Polynesia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31426235 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2812
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