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Author Richter, A.; Ng, K.T.W.; Karimi, N.
Title A data driven technique applying GIS, and remote sensing to rank locations for waste disposal site expansion Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Resources, Conservation and Recycling Abbreviated Journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling
Volume (down) 149 Issue Pages 352-362
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Landfilling is the most common method for final treatment of municipal solid waste worldwide. Canadians generated 973 kg/cap of waste in 2016, and 73% of that was sent to landfills or incinerators. This study proposes a novel method which combines remote sensing and vector data to rank the suitability of current landfill sites and their area of influence for expansion in Saskatchewan, Canada; where there are currently more than 500 active landfills. This study found that using average normalized data, 55.3% of the land in the study area was suitable or moderately suitable for landfill expansion while 45% of the area was unsuitable for landfill expansion. Polygon 32, an area dominated by agriculture and pasture land, is the most suitable for landfill expansion based on the mean normalized rank and was ranked 9th (out of 39) in terms of standard deviation. Polygon 27 is the least suitable for landfill expansion, having the largest mean normalized rank, and was ranked 38th (out of 39) in terms of standard deviation. This method is advantageous compared to other decision-making tools which rely on expert opinion. This method relies solely on remote sensing and vector data; but is flexible enough that weighting of data sets can be applied by policy makers if so desired. Results show that using remote sensing data and vector data together are capable of capturing distinctly different aspects of the study area, and that vector data can be used as a proxy for imagery where cloud cover is present.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-3449 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2582
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Author Shinobu Yasuo, Ayaka Iwamoto, Sang-il Lee, Shotaro Ochiai, Rina Hitachi, Satomi Shibata, Nobuo Uotsu, Chie Tarumizu, Sayuri Matsuoka, Mitsuhiro Furuse, Shigekazu Higuchi
Title L-Serine Enhances Light-Induced Circadian Phase Resetting in Mice and Humans Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Nutrition Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 147 Issue 12 Pages 2347-2355
Keywords Animals; Human Health
Abstract Background: The circadian clock is modulated by the timing of ingestion or food composition, but the effects of specific nutrients are poorly understood.

Objective: We aimed to identify the amino acids that modulate the circadian clock and reset the light-induced circadian phase in mice and humans.

Methods: Male CBA/N mice were orally administered 1 of 20 L-amino acids, and the circadian and light-induced phase shifts of wheel-running activity were analyzed. Antagonists of several neurotransmitter pathways were injected before L-serine administration, and light-induced phase shifts were analyzed. In addition, the effect of L-serine on the light-induced phase advance was investigated in healthy male students (mean ± SD age 22.2 ± 1.8 y) by using dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) determined by saliva samples as an index of the circadian phase.

Results: L-Serine administration enhanced light-induced phase shifts in mice (1.86-fold; P < 0.05). Both L-serine and its metabolite D-serine, a coagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, exerted this effect, but D-serine concentrations in the hypothalamus did not increase after L-serine administration. The effect of L-serine was blocked by picrotoxin, an antagonist of &#947;-aminobutyric acid A receptors, but not by MK801, an antagonist of NMDA receptors. L-Serine administration altered the long-term expression patterns of clock genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. After advancing the light-dark cycle by 6 h, L-serine administration slightly accelerated re-entrainment to the shifted cycle. In humans, L-serine ingestion before bedtime induced significantly larger phase advances of DLMO after bright-light exposure during the morning (means ± SEMs—L-serine: 25.9 ± 6.6 min; placebo: 12.1 ± 7.0 min; P < 0.05).

Conclusion: These results suggest that L-serine enhances light-induced phase resetting in mice and humans, and it may be useful for treating circadian disturbances.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1784
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Author O'Connor, J.J.; Fobert, E.K.; Besson, M.; Jacob, H.; Lecchini, D.
Title Live fast, die young: Behavioural and physiological impacts of light pollution on a marine fish during larval recruitment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Marine Pollution Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Mar Pollut Bull
Volume (down) 146 Issue Pages 908-914
Keywords Animals; Ecosystem; Environmental Pollution/adverse effects; Fishes/growth & development/*physiology; Larva/growth & development/physiology/*radiation effects; Light/*adverse effects; Metamorphosis, Biological/radiation effects; Predatory Behavior/radiation effects; Coral reefs; Fish larvae; Light pollution; Metamorphosis; Recruitment
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a recently acknowledged form of anthropogenic pollution of growing concern to the biology and ecology of exposed organisms. Though ALAN can have detrimental effects on physiology and behaviour, we have little understanding of how marine organisms in coastal areas may be impacted. Here, we investigated the effects of ALAN exposure on coral reef fish larvae during the critical recruitment stage, encompassing settlement, metamorphosis, and post-settlement survival. We found that larvae avoided illuminated settlement habitats, however those living under ALAN conditions for 10days post-settlement experienced changes in swimming behaviour and higher susceptibility to nocturnal predation. Although ALAN-exposed fish grew faster and heavier than control fish, they also experienced significantly higher mortality rates by the end of the experimental period. This is the first study on the ecological impacts of ALAN during the early life history of marine fish.
Address Institute for Pacific Coral Reefs, IRCP, 98729, Moorea, French Polynesia; PSL Research University: EPHE-UPVD-CNRS, USR3278 CRIOBE, BP 1013, 98729 Papetoai, Moorea, French Polynesia; Laboratoire d'Excellence “CORAIL”, Moorea, French Polynesia
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0025-326X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31426235 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2812
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Author Jiang, Z.; Zhai, W.; Meng, X.; Long, Y.
Title Identifying Shrinking Cities with NPP-VIIRS Nightlight Data in China Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Urban Planning and Development Abbreviated Journal J. Urban Plann. Dev.
Volume (down) 146 Issue 4 Pages 04020034
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Although there has been a rapid urbanization in China since the 1980s, the simultaneous urban shrinkage phenomenon has existed for a long time. The study of shrinking cities is particularly important for China as the current urban development has changed from physical expansion to built-up area improvement. After redefining what constitutes a city (what we term a natural city), we compared the adjusted nightlight intensity of National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) data between 2013 and 2016 to accurately identify shrinking cities throughout China. The results indicate that there are 2,862 redefined natural cities in China and that the total area reaches 53,275 km2, about 0.5% of the national territory. Based on this, we identified 798 shrinking cities with a total area of 13,839 km2. After analyzing the relative position of shrinking cities and internal shrinking pixels in the geometric space, the morphological characteristics of shrinking cities were systematically classified into six patterns. The majority of shrinking cities belong to scatter shrinkage, central shrinkage, and local shrinkage; only 5% are complete shrinkage; the rest are unilateral shrinkage and peripheral shrinkage. In addition, six shrinkage causes were quantitatively classified and summarized by referring to multiple-source urban data and municipal yearbooks. To enrich the methodological system for urban shrinkage, the research provides a reminder of the need to consider the other side of urbanization (i.e., dissolution of social networks) and proposes appropriate strategies and policies to address shrinkage issues.
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ISSN 0733-9488 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3065
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Author Fehrer, D.; Krarti, M.
Title Spatial distribution of building energy use in the United States through satellite imagery of the earth at night Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Building and Environment Abbreviated Journal Building and Environment
Volume (down) 142 Issue Pages 252-264
Keywords remote sensing
Abstract Despite the importance of geospatial analysis of energy use in buildings, the data available for such exercises is limited. A potential solution is to use geospatial information, such as that obtained from satellites, to disaggregate building energy use data to a more useful scale. Many researchers have used satellite imagery to estimate the extent of human activities, including building energy use and population distribution. Much of the reported work has been carried out in rapidly developing countries such as India and China where urban development is dynamic and not always easy to measure. In countries with less rapid urbanization, such as the United States, there is still value in using satellite imagery to estimate building energy use for the purposes of identifying energy efficiency opportunities and planning electricity transmission. This study evaluates nighttime light imagery obtained from the VIIRS instrument aboard the SUOMI NPP satellite as a predictor of building energy use intensity within states, counties, and cities in the United States. It is found that nighttime lights can explain upwards of 90% of the variability in energy consumption in the United States, depending on conditions and geospatial scale. The results of this research are used to generate electricity and fuel consumption maps of the United States with a resolution of less than 200 square meters. The methodologies undertaken in this study can be replicated globally to create more opportunities for geospatial energy analysis without the hurdles often associated with disaggregated building energy use data collection.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-1323 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1938
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