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Author de Jong, M.; Lamers, K.P.; Eugster, M.; Ouyang, J.Q.; Da Silva, A.; Mateman, A.C.; van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of experimental light at night on extra-pair paternity in a songbird Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 441-448  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract Light pollution is increasing worldwide and significantly affects animal behavior. In birds, these effects include advancement of morning activity and onset of dawn song, which may affect extra-pair paternity. Advanced dawn song of males may stimulate females to engage in extra-pair copulations, and the earlier activity onset may affect the males' mate guarding behavior. Earlier work showed an effect of light at night on extra-pair behavior, but this was in an area with other anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we present a two-year experimental study on effects of light at night on extra-pair paternity of great tits (Parus major). Previously dark natural areas were illuminated with white, red, and green LED lamps and compared to a dark control. In 2014, the proportion of extra-pair young in broods increased with distance to the red and white lamps (i.e., at lower light intensities), but decreased with distance to the poles in the dark control. In 2013, we found no effects on the proportion of extra-pair young. The total number of offspring sired by a male was unaffected by artificial light at night in both years, suggesting that potential changes in female fidelity in pairs breeding close to white and red light did not translate into fitness benefits for the males of these pairs. Artificial light at night might disrupt the natural patterns of extra-pair paternity, possibly negates potential benefits of extra-pair copulations and thus could alter sexual selection processes in wild birds.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29952126 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1953  
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Author Kumar, J.; Malik, S.; Bhardwaj, S.K.; Rani, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright light at night alters the perception of daylength in Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 488-496  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The brighter nights have posed new challenges to the wild species by affecting their temporal physiology. The present study on Indian weaver bird (Ploceus philippinus) investigated if exposure to bright light at different phases of night affects their clock-mediated daily functions. Birds were placed individually in specially designed activity cages under short days and long nights (8L:16D; L = 100 lux, D < 0.1 lux) for approximately 3 weeks (19 days). Thereafter, they were divided into four groups (n = 6-9), and given approximately 2 lux light either for the entire night (ZT 08-24; zeitgeber time 0 = time of light on; pattern A) or for 4 hr (pattern B), placed in 16 hr night such that its onset coincides with the onset of night (early night group, ZT 08-12), its end with the end of night (late night group, ZT 20-24), or the night was interrupted in the middle (midnight group, ZT 14-18). The results showed that bright light in entire night induced early onset of day activity and fragmented rest at night, however, if given at different phases of night, it made the days longer by delaying end (early night group) or advancing onset of daily activity (late night group). It also suppressed the melatonin levels and increased body temperature. These results suggest that bright light at night alters the perception of daylength and affects the underlying physiology. The findings may be useful in adopting a strategy for use of night light without disturbing species fitness in their environment.  
  Address Department of Zoology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30043408 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1971  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Middleton, B.; Stone, B.M.; Arendt, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human circadian phase in 12:12 h, 200:<8 lux and 1000:<8 lux light-dark cycles, without scheduled sleep or activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Neuroscience Letters Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience Letters  
  Volume (down) 329 Issue 1 Pages 41-44  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract The light levels required to maintain human circadian phase in the absence of other strong time cues are not defined. We investigated circadian phase in two groups of men, living in partial temporal isolation, exposed to 12 h:12 h light:dark cycles of: (A) 200:<8 lux, broad spectrum white light for 14 days; and (B) 1000:<8lux for 14 days. The rhythm variables measured were urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin, rectal temperature, activity and rest (actigraphy and sleep logs). In 200:<8 lux four/six individuals showed phase delays. Exposure to 1000:<8 lux appeared to maintain synchronisation of rest-activity to 24 h, but with a significant overall phase advance of 0.81 h in temperature. These observations suggest that domestic intensity light does not maintain phase without scheduled sleep/activity, possibly due to indirect effects on behaviour influencing light exposure.  
  Address  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3940 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2247  
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Bedrosian, T.A.; Zhang, N.; Weil, Z.M.; DeVries, A.C.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night impairs recovery from global cerebral ischemia Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Experimental Neurology Abbreviated Journal Exp Neurol  
  Volume (down) 317 Issue Pages 100-109  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; cerebral ischemia  
  Abstract Nighttime lighting is one of the great conveniences of modernization; however, there is mounting evidence that inopportune light exposure can disrupt physiological and behavioral functions. Hospital patients may be particularly vulnerable to the consequences of light at night due to their compromised physiological state. Cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA) was used to test the hypothesis in mice that exposure to dim light at night impairs central nervous system (CNS) recovery from a major pathological insult. Mice exposed to dim light at night (5lx) had higher mortality in the week following cardiac arrest compared to mice housed in dark nights (0lx). Neuronal damage was significantly greater in surviving mice exposed to dim light at night after CA versus those housed in dark nights. Dim light at night may have elevated neuronal damage by amplifying pro-inflammatory pathways in the CNS; Iba1 immunoreactivity (an indication of microglia activation) and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression were elevated in mice exposed to dim light at night post-CA. Furthermore, selective inhibition of IL-1beta or TNFalpha ameliorated damage in mice exposed to dim light at night. The effects of light at night on CA outcomes were also prevented by using a wavelength of nighttime light that has minimal impact on the endogenous circadian clock, suggesting that replacing broad-spectrum nighttime light with specific circadian-inert wavelengths could be protective. Together, these data indicate that exposure to dim light at night after global cerebral ischemia increases neuroinflammation, in turn exacerbating neurological damage and potential for mortality.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0014-4886 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30822422 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2235  
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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Melendez-Fernandez, O.H.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prior exposure to dim light at night impairs dermal wound healing in female C57BL/6 mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Archives of Dermatological Research Abbreviated Journal Arch Dermatol Res  
  Volume (down) 311 Issue 7 Pages 573-576  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; Skin; Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (LAN) is a pervasive phenomenon in today's society, and the detrimental consequences of LAN exposure are becoming apparent. LAN is associated with the increased incidence of metabolic disorders, cancers, mood alterations, and immune dysfunction in mammals. Consequently, we examined the effects of dim LAN (DLAN) on wound healing. Female C57BL/6 mice were housed for 3 weeks in DLAN or LD conditions prior to wounding. Following wounding, mice were maintained in either their previous light conditions or switched to the opposite lighting conditions for 3 weeks. DLAN prior to wounding impaired healing; specifically, mice in DLAN/DLAN had significantly larger wounds on day 8. Additionally, mice in DLAN/LD had significantly larger wounds on days 5, 7, 8, and 9, and increased average time to closure. These data demonstrate a potential harmful effect of DLAN on wound healing that should be considered and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention.  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-3696 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31144020 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2515  
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