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Author Murphy, B.A.; O’Brien, C.; Elliott, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Red light at night permits the nocturnal rise of melatonin production in horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal The Veterinary Journal  
  Volume (down) 252 Issue Pages 105360  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Exposure to white light at night suppresses melatonin production, impacts circadian rhythms and contributes to ill-health in humans. Human interaction with horses frequently occurs at night. We tested the hypothesis that dim red light would not suppress the nightly rise in serum melatonin levels in horses. In a crossover design, six horses were maintained for consecutive 48 h periods under a Light:Red (LR) and a Light:Dark (LD) photo-schedule. Transitions from light (>200 lux, polychromatic white light) to red (5 lux, peak wavelength 625 nm) or dark (<0.5 lux), and vice versa, coincided with ambient sunset and sunrise times. Blood was collected at 2 h intervals for 24 h during each treatment via indwelling jugular catheters. Samples were harvested for serum and stored at −20 °C until assayed for melatonin by radioimmunoassay. Repeated measures two-way ANOVA and t-tests analysed for differences in LR and LD melatonin profiles and their circadian rhythm parameters.

No time x treatment interaction or effect of treatment on serum melatonin levels were demonstrated (P > 0.05). A robust main effect of time (P<0.0001) predominated, with melatonin levels rising at night under both treatments. Statistically significant differences were not observed when LR and LD were compared for circadian rhythm measures of night time peak, area under the curve (AUC), or for times of onset (evening rise), offset (morning decline), or peak duration. Low intensity red light at night did not impact the pattern of melatonin secretion in this study and is, therefore, unlikely to impact the physiology of circadian or seasonal regulation.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2656  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author May, D.; Shidemantle, G.; Melnick-Kelley, Q.; Crane, K.; Hua, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of intensified illuminance and artificial light at night on fitness and susceptibility to abiotic and biotic stressors Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume (down) 251 Issue Pages 600-608  
  Keywords Animals; frogs; amphibians; Lithobates sylvaticus  
  Abstract Changing light conditions due to human activities represents an important emerging environmental concern. Although changes to natural light conditions can be independently detrimental, in nature, organisms commonly face multiple stressors. To understand the consequences of altered light conditions, we exposed a model amphibian (wood frog; Lithobates sylvaticus) to a control and two anthropogenic light conditions: intensified daytime illuminance and artificial light at night – ALAN (intensified daytime illuminance + extended photoperiod). We measured (1) metrics of fitness (hatching success as well as survival to, size at, and time to metamorphosis) (2) susceptibility (time to death) to a commonly co-occurring anthropogenic stressor, road salt (NaCl) and (3) susceptibility (infection load) to a common parasite (trematode). We also explored behavioral (swimming activity) and physiological (baseline corticosterone (CORT) release rates) changes induced by these light conditions, which may mediate changes in the other measured parameters. We found that both intensified daytime illuminance and ALAN reduced hatching success. In contrast, for amphibians that successfully hatched, neither treatment affected amphibian survival or time to metamorphosis but individuals exposed to ALAN were larger at metamorphosis. The light treatments also had marginal effects; individuals in ALAN treatments were more susceptible to NaCl and trematodes. Finally, tadpoles exposed to ALAN moved significantly less than tadpoles in the control and intensified daytime illuminance treatments, while light had no effect on CORT release rate. Overall, changes in light conditions, in particular ALAN, significantly impacted an amphibian model in laboratory conditions. This work underscores the importance of considering not only the direct effects of light on fitness metrics but also the indirect effects of light with other abiotic and biotic stressors. Anthropogenic-induced changes to light conditions are expected to continue increasing over time so understanding the diverse consequences of shifting light conditions will be paramount to protecting wildlife populations.  
  Address Biological Sciences Department, Binghamton University (SUNY), Binghamton, NY 13902, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2381  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lamphar, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spatio-temporal association of light pollution and urban sprawl using remote sensing imagery and GIS: A simple method based in Otsu's algorithm Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume (down) 251 Issue Pages 107060  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Automatic thresholding methods are used to detect spatio-temporal changes in the land subject to different natural and anthropogenic processes. Image segmentation plays an important role in this analysis, where urban sprawl detection take place with daylight images. However, recently some investigators have used nocturnal images in remote sensing imagery research. Such georeferenced data represent a good tool for analysis of the light pollution and urban sprawl. There are various physical processes involved in the radiative transfer of the light projected from the cities. Though, with a correct method based on background subtraction, any satellite remotely sensed nocturnal image can be useful in detecting urban sprawl. We base this work on thresholding processes of georeferenced nocturnal satellite images. We used a method combining digital classification techniques, geographic information systems and statistical analyzes. The proposed method is helpful because of a simple implementation and time saving. The pixel intensity of nocturnal images can offer a tool to calculate aspects related to electricity consumption and the efficiency of public lighting. We hope the results motivates other authors to study relationships with other social, natural and economic issues.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2990  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kocifaj, M.; Kundracik, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multi-wavelength radiometry of aerosols designed for more accurate night sky brightness predictions Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume (down) 250 Issue Pages 106998  
  Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Scattering by aerosols and gases cause a certain fraction of artificial light emitted upwards is redirected to the ground. Of all atmospheric constituents just the aerosols are most important modulators of night-sky brightness under cloudless conditions. Unlike most of the previous we highlight a crucial role of solar radiometry for determining the atmospheric optical depth before night-time observation is to be made. Aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths extracted from the data measured provides then the information on size distribution or mean refractive index of aerosol particles that in turn are both necessary to make night sky brightness prediction more accurate. Therefore, combining daytime and night-time radiometry we can achieve accuracy much higher than ever before. This is due to significantly reduced uncertainty in aerosol properties.

The aerosol data are retrieved from a new portable multi-wavelength optical analyzer that operates Ocean Optics spectrometer. The equipment provides the radiance data from 350 nm to 1000 nm with spectral resolution of 1 nm. Due to high sun radiance levels we use a system of mirrors each reducing the signal to about 4%, while keeping the integration time short. The minimum integration time of 3 ms allows for detection of direct sunlight. The system developed is sensitive to small changes in the aerosol system, while showing a good detection limit even under low turbidity conditions. The system performance is demonstrated in field experiment conducted shortly after front passage when most of aerosol particles is effectively removed by rain.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2906  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhang, X.; Yang, W.; Liang, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Intensity dependent disruptive effects of light at night on activation of the HPG axis of tree sparrows (Passer montanus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume (down) 249 Issue Pages 904-909  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis; HPG axis; wild tree sparrow; Passer montanus; endocrine  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become increasingly recognized as a disruptor of the reproductive endocrine process and behavior of wild birds. However, there is no evidence that ALAN directly disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and no information on the effects of different ALAN intensities on birds. We experimentally tested whether ALAN affects reproductive endocrine activation in the HPG axis of birds, and whether this effect is related to the intensity of ALAN, in wild tree sparrows (Passer montanus). Forty-eight adult female birds were randomly assigned to four groups. They were first exposed to a short light photoperiod (8 h light and 16 h dark per day) for 20 days, then exposed to a long light photoperiod (16 h light and 8 h dark per day) to initiate the reproductive endocrine process. During these two kinds of photoperiod treatments, the four groups of birds were exposed to 0, 85, 150, and 300 lux light in the dark phase (night) respectively. The expression of the reproductive endocrine activation related TSH-β, Dio2 and GnRH-I gene was significantly higher in birds exposed to 85 lux light at night, and significantly lower in birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux, relative to the 0 lux control. The birds exposed to 85 lux had higher peak values of plasma LH and estradiol concentration and reached the peak earlier than birds exposed to 0, 150, or 300 lux did. The lower gene expression of birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux reduced their peak LH and estradiol values, but did not delay the timing of these peaks compared to the control group. These results reveal that low intensity ALAN accelerates the activation of the reproductive endocrine process in the HPG axis, whereas high intensity ALAN retards it.  
  Address College of Life and Environment Science, Minzu University of China, Beijing, 100081, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2281  
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