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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Melendez-Fernandez, O.H.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Prior exposure to dim light at night impairs dermal wound healing in female C57BL/6 mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Archives of Dermatological Research Abbreviated Journal Arch Dermatol Res  
  Volume (down) 311 Issue 7 Pages 573-576  
  Keywords Animals; mouse models; Skin; Human Health  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (LAN) is a pervasive phenomenon in today's society, and the detrimental consequences of LAN exposure are becoming apparent. LAN is associated with the increased incidence of metabolic disorders, cancers, mood alterations, and immune dysfunction in mammals. Consequently, we examined the effects of dim LAN (DLAN) on wound healing. Female C57BL/6 mice were housed for 3 weeks in DLAN or LD conditions prior to wounding. Following wounding, mice were maintained in either their previous light conditions or switched to the opposite lighting conditions for 3 weeks. DLAN prior to wounding impaired healing; specifically, mice in DLAN/DLAN had significantly larger wounds on day 8. Additionally, mice in DLAN/LD had significantly larger wounds on days 5, 7, 8, and 9, and increased average time to closure. These data demonstrate a potential harmful effect of DLAN on wound healing that should be considered and may represent a target for therapeutic intervention.  
  Address Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0340-3696 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31144020 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2515  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wang, X.; Cheng, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Study on the Temporal and Spatial Pattern Differences of Chinese Light Curl Based on DMSP/OLS Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal IOP Conf. Ser.: Earth Environ. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 310 Issue Pages 032072  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Nighttime light data can detect surface gleams that can intuitively reflect human socioeconomic activity.This paper uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime lighting data from 2001 to 2007 to analyze the coupling relationship between regional economic development and nighttime light intensity in China using regression model.The results show that the brightest areas of nighttime light are mainly concentrated in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, the Yangtze River Delta region, and the Pearl River Delta region. With the change of theyear, the brightness of the three regions is brighter year by year, indicating that the economy is more and more developed.The linear regression model of total brightness and GDP of regional light: Y=792.218+0.024X, linear slope is 0.024, indicating a positive correlation trend.The provinces and cities with the highest total brightness of the provinces and cities are Guangdong Province, Shandong Province, and Jiangsu Province, and the lowest provinces and cities are Qinghai Province and Tibet Autonomous Region.The total brightness of regional lights in China's provinces and cities is well coupled with GDP. The total brightness of regional lights in all provinces and cities is weakened from east to west. The brightness of the 11 provinces in the eastern region is the strongest, including Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Liaoning, Shanghai, and Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Fujian, Shandong, Guangdong, Hainan Province.The second most powerful lighting is the eight provinces in the central region including Shanxi, Jilin, Heilongjiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Henan, Hubei, and Hunan.The weakest lighting is in the western regions of Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Yunnan, Tibet, Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia, Xinjiang, Guangxi, Inner Mongolia and other provinces (cities).In the east of the Hu Huanyong line, the nighttime lighting is higher than the west of the Hu Huanyong line.The eastern part of China's seven geographical divisions (Shanghai, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Anhui, Jiangxi, Shandong, Fujian, and Taiwan) has the brightest night lights.The northwestern region (Shaanxi, Gansu, Qinghai, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region) has a weak night light.The brightness information of nighttime remote sensing data selected in this study can reflect the level of regional economic development.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1755-1315 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2670  
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Author Seymoure, B. M., Linares, C., & White, J. doi  openurl
  Title Connecting spectral radiometry of anthropogenic light sources to the visual ecology of organisms Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 308 Issue 2 Pages 93-110  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; color space; ecological consequences; just noticeable difference; light pollution; photoreceptors; radiance; visual models; visual systems  
  Abstract Humans have drastically altered nocturnal environments with electric lighting. Animals depend on natural night light conditions and are now being inundated with artificial lighting. There are numerous artificial light sources that differ in spectral composition that should affect the perception of these light sources and due to differences in animal visual systems, the differences in color perception of these anthropogenic light sources should vary significantly. The ecological and evolutionary ramifications of these perceptual differences of light sources remain understudied. Here, we quantify the radiance of nine different street lights comprised of four different light sources: Metal Halide, Mercury Vapor, Light Emitting Diodes, and High‐Pressure Sodium and model how five animal visual systems will be stimulated by these light sources. We calculated the number of photons that photoreceptors in different visual systems would detect. We selected five visual systems: avian UV/VIS, avian V/VIS, human, wolf and hawk moth. We included non‐visual photoreceptors of vertebrates known for controlling circadian rhythms and other physiological traits. The nine light types stimulated visual systems and the photoreceptors within the visual systems differently. Furthermore, we modelled the chromatic contrast (Just Noticeable Differences [JNDs]) and color space overlap for each light type comparison for each visual system to see if organisms would perceive the lights as different colors. The JNDs of most light type comparisons were very high, indicating most visual systems would detect all light types as different colors, however mammalian visual systems would perceive many lights as the same color. We discuss the importance of understanding not only the brightness of artificial light types, but also the spectral composition of light types, as most organisms have different visual systems from humans. Thus, for researchers to understand how artificial light sources affect the visual environment of specific organisms and thus mitigate the effects, spectral information is crucial.  
  Address Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA; brett.seymoure(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher ZSL Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2306  
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Author Villamizar, N.; García-Alcazar, A.; Sánchez-Vázquez, F. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of light spectrum and photoperiod on the growth, development and survival of European sea bass (Dicentrarchuslabrax) larvae Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 292 Issue 1-2 Pages 80-86  
  Keywords animals; fish; light spectrum; photoperiod  
  Abstract This study investigates how the characteristics (spectrum and photoperiod) of artificial light affect European sea bass eggs and larvae from &#8722; 1 to 40 days post-hatching. Fertilised eggs and larvae were reared under five different light treatments: 12L:12D red light (LDR; half-peak bandwidth = 641–718 nm), 12L:12D blue light (LDB; half-peak bandwidth = 435–500 nm), 12L:12D broad-spectrum white light (LDW; 367 < &#955; < 1057 nm), 24L:0D broad-spectrum white light (LL) and 0L:24D (DD). The results showed that total length at day post-hatching 40 was significantly larger in larvae reared under LDB (15.4 ± 0.6 mm) and LL (15.2 ± 0.6 mm) than in larvae reared under LDR (11.7 ± 0.7 mm). Overall wet weight was highest under LDB (21.6 ± 2.02 mgr) and lowest in LDR larvae (13.6 ± 1.48 mgr). Yolk sac and oil globule absorption occurred more slowly in LDR and DD larvae, while LDB larvae developed their fin, teeth and swim bladder significantly earlier than the rest of the groups. DD larvae were unable to capture food and mortality was 100% by day post-hatching 18, while LDR larvae did not feed on rotifers, but fed on Artemia from day post-hatching 16 onwards. The best survival was obtained with the LL treatment, although significantly more problems with swim bladder development and lower jaw malformations were also identified in this group. In summary, these results highlight the key role of the light spectrum and photoperiod for European sea bass larvae, the best performance being achieved under the light conditions that best approached those of their natural aquatic environment (LDB). These findings should be considered when designing rearing protocols for larvae in aquaculture.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1606  
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Author Winger, B.M.; Weeks, B.C.; Farnsworth, A.; Jones, A.W.; Hennen, M.; Willard, D.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal flight-calling behaviour predicts vulnerability to artificial light in migratory birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume (down) 286 Issue 1900 Pages 20190364  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract Understanding interactions between biota and the built environment is increasingly important as human modification of the landscape expands in extent and intensity. For migratory birds, collisions with lighted structures are a major cause of mortality, but the mechanisms behind these collisions are poorly understood. Using 40 years of collision records of passerine birds, we investigated the importance of species' behavioural ecologies in predicting rates of building collisions during nocturnal migration through Chicago, IL and Cleveland, OH, USA. We found that the use of nocturnal flight calls is an important predictor of collision risk in nocturnally migrating passerine birds. Species that produce flight calls during nocturnal migration tended to collide with buildings more than expected given their local abundance, whereas those that do not use such communication collided much less frequently. Our results suggest that a stronger attraction response to artificial light at night in species that produce flight calls may mediate these differences in collision rates. Nocturnal flight calls probably evolved to facilitate collective decision-making during navigation, but this same social behaviour may now exacerbate vulnerability to a widespread anthropogenic disturbance. Our results also suggest that social behaviour during migration may reflect poorly understood differences in navigational mechanisms across lineages of birds.  
  Address 4 Gantz Family Collections Center, The Field Museum , 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 , USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30940055 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2287  
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