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Author Esaki, Y.; Kitajima, T.; Obayashi, K.; Saeki, K.; Fujita, K.; Iwata, N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light exposure at night and sleep quality in bipolar disorder: the APPLE cohort study Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Affective Disorders Abbreviated Journal Journal of Affective Disorders  
  Volume (down) 257 Issue Pages 314-320  
  Keywords Human Health; mood disorders; Bipolar Disorder; Sleep; sleep efficiency; sleep quality  
  Abstract Background

Sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder (BD) is common and is associated with a risk for mood episode recurrence. Thus, it is important to identify factors that are related to sleep disturbance in BD. This cross-sectional study investigated the association between exposure to light at night (LAN) and sleep parameters in patients with BD.

Methods

The sleep parameters of 175 outpatients with BD were recorded using actigraphy at their homes for seven consecutive nights and were evaluated using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). The average LAN intensity in the bedroom during bedtime and rising time was measured using a portable photometer, and the participants were divided into two groups: “Light” (≥5 lux) and “Dark” (<5 lux). The association between LAN and sleep parameters was tested with multivariable analysis by adjusting for potential confounder such as age, gender, current smoker, mood state, day length, daytime light exposure, and sedative medications.

Results

After adjusting for potential confounder, the actigraphy sleep parameters showed significantly lower sleep efficiency (mean, 80.1% vs. 83.4%; p = 0.01), longer log-transformed sleep onset latency (2.9 vs. 2.6 min; p = 0.01), and greater wake after sleep onset (51.4 vs. 41.6 min; p = 0.02) in the Light group than in the Dark group. Whereas, there were no significant differences in the ISI scores between the groups.

Limitations

This was a cross-sectional study; therefore, the results do not necessarily imply that LAN causes sleep disturbance.

Conclusions

Reducing LAN exposure may contribute to improved sleep quality in patients with BD.
 
  Address Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital, Aichi, Japan; esakiz(at)fujita-hu.ac.jp  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0165-0327 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2561  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dominoni, D.M.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume (down) 256 Issue Pages 113314  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24 h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.  
  Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, the Netherlands; avide.dominoni(at)glasgow.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2744  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Renthlei, Z.; Trivedi, A.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of urban environment on pineal machinery and clock genes expression of tree sparrow (Passer montanus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume (down) 255 Issue Pages 113278  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Increasing urbanisation is altering the physiology of wild animals and the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. We hypothesised that altering the physiology of urban organisms is due to the effect of extra light at night on the circadian clock by modulating the expression of pineal machinery and clock genes. Two experiments were performed. In Experiment 1, immediately after being procured from their respective sites (urban and rural sites), birds were released individually in LLdim light conditions. Circadian rhythm period, activity duration, and total activity count were calculated and did not differ between urban and rural birds. In Experiment 2, birds (from urban and rural habitats) were sampled at six time points at regular 4-h intervals, beginning 1 h after sunrise. We measured daily variations in plasma melatonin levels. We also analysed the expression levels of Aanat, Mel1A and Mel1B as an indicator of melatonin biosynthesis and action machinery. Clock and clock-controlled genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per2, Per3, Cry1 and Npas2) were studied in the hypothalamus, the pineal gland, and retina to investigate the effects of urban habitats on the circadian clock. Our results show that there is a lower expression of Aanat in the pineal gland and relatively low plasma melatonin levels in urban birds. Further, clock genes are also differentially expressed in all three central tissues of urban birds. We propose that alterations in the melatonin biosynthesis machinery and the expression of clock genes could result in miscalculations in the internal timing of the organism, with environmental timings leading to altered physiology in urban wild animals.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2682  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Russo, D.; Cosentino, F.; Festa, F.; De Benedetta, F.; Pejic, B.; Cerretti, P.; Ancillotto, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial illumination near rivers may alter bat-insect trophic interactions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume (down) 252 Issue Pt B Pages 1671-1677  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial illumination at night represents an increasingly concerning threat to ecosystems worldwide, altering persistence, behaviour, physiology and fitness of many organisms and their mutual interactions, in the long-term affecting ecosystem functioning. Bats are very sensitive to artificial light at night because they are obligate nocturnal and feed on insects which are often also responsive to lights. Here we tested the effects of LED lighting on prey-predator interactions at riverine ecosystems, using bats and their insect prey as models, and compared bat and insect reactions in terms of bat activity and prey insect abundance and diversity, respectively, on artificially lit vs. unlit nights. Artificial light influenced both insect and bat assemblages in taxon-specific directions: insect abundances increased at lit sites, particularly due to an increase in small dipterans near the light source. Composition of insect assemblages also differed significantly between lit and unlit sites. Total bat activity declined at lit sites, but this change was mainly due to the response of the most abundant species, Myotis daubentonii, while opportunistic species showed no reaction or even an opposite pattern (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We show that artificial lighting along rivers may affect trophic interactions between bats and insects, resulting in a profound alteration of community structure and dynamics.  
  Address Wildlife Research Unit, Dipartimento di Agraria, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Universita, 100, 80055, Portici, Italy  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31284209 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2572  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Murphy, B.A.; O’Brien, C.; Elliott, J.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Red light at night permits the nocturnal rise of melatonin production in horses Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal The Veterinary Journal  
  Volume (down) 252 Issue Pages 105360  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Exposure to white light at night suppresses melatonin production, impacts circadian rhythms and contributes to ill-health in humans. Human interaction with horses frequently occurs at night. We tested the hypothesis that dim red light would not suppress the nightly rise in serum melatonin levels in horses. In a crossover design, six horses were maintained for consecutive 48 h periods under a Light:Red (LR) and a Light:Dark (LD) photo-schedule. Transitions from light (>200 lux, polychromatic white light) to red (5 lux, peak wavelength 625 nm) or dark (<0.5 lux), and vice versa, coincided with ambient sunset and sunrise times. Blood was collected at 2 h intervals for 24 h during each treatment via indwelling jugular catheters. Samples were harvested for serum and stored at −20 °C until assayed for melatonin by radioimmunoassay. Repeated measures two-way ANOVA and t-tests analysed for differences in LR and LD melatonin profiles and their circadian rhythm parameters.

No time x treatment interaction or effect of treatment on serum melatonin levels were demonstrated (P > 0.05). A robust main effect of time (P<0.0001) predominated, with melatonin levels rising at night under both treatments. Statistically significant differences were not observed when LR and LD were compared for circadian rhythm measures of night time peak, area under the curve (AUC), or for times of onset (evening rise), offset (morning decline), or peak duration. Low intensity red light at night did not impact the pattern of melatonin secretion in this study and is, therefore, unlikely to impact the physiology of circadian or seasonal regulation.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2656  
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