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Author Kalousová, L.; Xiao, B.; Burgard, S.A.
Title Material hardship and sleep: results from the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sleep Health Abbreviated Journal Sleep Health
Volume (up) in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract Objective

Sleep is unequally distributed in the US population. People with low socioeconomic status report worse quality and shorter sleep than people with high socioeconomic status. Past research hypothesized that a potential reason for this link could be exposure to material hardship. This study examines the associations between several material hardships and sleep outcomes.

Methods

We use population-representative cross-sectional data (n = 730) from the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study collected in 2013 and examine the associations between 6 indicators of material hardship (employment instability, financial problems, housing instability, food insecurity, forgone medical care, and the total number of material hardships reported) and 3 sleep outcomes (short sleep, sleep problems, and nonrestorative sleep). We build multivariable logistic regression models controlling for respondents’ characteristics and light pollution near their residence.

Results

In unadjusted models, all material hardships were associated with negative sleep outcomes. In adjusted models, forgone medical care was a statistically significant predictor of nonrestorative sleep (average marginal effect 0.16), as was employment instability (average marginal effect 0.12). The probability of sleep problems and nonrestorative sleep increased with a greater number of hardships overall (average marginal effects of .02 and .05, respectively). We found marginally statistically significant positive associations between food insecurity and short sleep and sleep problems.

Conclusions

This study finds that, except when considering foregone medical care, employment instability, and total count of material hardships, associations between material hardship and negative sleep outcomes are not statistically significant after adjusting for a robust set of sociodemographic and health characteristics.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2352-7218 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2180
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Author Prayag, A.S.; Najjar, R.P.; Gronfier, C.
Title Melatonin suppression is exquisitely sensitive to light and primarily driven by melanopsin in humans Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume (up) in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Light elicits a range of non-visual responses in humans. Driven predominantly by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), but also by rods and/or cones, these responses include melatonin suppression. A sigmoidal relationship has been established between melatonin suppression and light intensity, however photoreceptoral involvement remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we first modelled the relationships between alpha-opic illuminances and melatonin suppression using an extensive dataset by Brainard and colleagues. Our results show that 1) melatonin suppression is better predicted by melanopic illuminance compared to other alpha-opic illuminances, 2) melatonin suppression is predicted to occur at levels as low as ~1.5 melanopic lux (melanopsin-weighted irradiance 0.2 muW/cm(2)), 3) saturation occurs at 305 melanopic lux (melanopsin-weighted irradiance 36.6 muW/cm(2)). We then tested this melanopsin-weighted illuminance response model derived from Brainard and colleagues' data and show that it predicts equally well melatonin suppression data from our laboratory, although obtained using different intensities and exposure duration. DISCUSSION: Together, our findings suggest that melatonin suppression by monochromatic lights is predominantly driven by melanopsin, and that it can be initiated at extremely low melanopic lux levels in experimental conditions. This emphasizes the concern of the non-visual impacts of low light intensities in lighting design and light-emitting devices. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Integrative Physiology of the Brain Arousal Systems, Waking team, Inserm UMRS 1028, CNRS UMR 5292, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Universite de Lyon, F-69000, Lyon, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30697806 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2186
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Author Bará, S., Ulla, A.
Title Light Pollution in the Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park 2018 Report Type Report
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords Conservation; Spain; Galicia; Europe; national park
Abstract The Galician Atlantic Islands Maritime-Terrestrial National Park (PNMTIAG), with the exception of the island of Cortegada, still has night skies of acceptable quality. However, the PNMTIAG islands are under strong photic pressures, both internal and external, that hinder the preservation of the basic features of the natural night, and call for an immediate action of all concerned stakeholders
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher USC Tragsa Place of Publication Editor
Language Galician Summary Language Galician Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2187
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Author Durrant, J.; Green, M.P.; Jones, T.M.
Title Dim artificial light at night reduces the cellular immune response of the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Insect Sci
Volume (up) in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract A functioning immune system is crucial for protection against disease and illness, yet increasing evidence suggests that species living in urban areas could be suffering from immune suppression, due to the presence of artificial light at night (ALAN). This study examined the effects of ecologically relevant levels of ALAN on three key measures of immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity, and phenoloxidase activity) using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We reared crickets under an ecologically relevant daily light-cycle consisting of 12 hr bright daylight (2600 lx) followed by either 12 h darkness (0 lx) or dim environmentally-relevant ALAN (1, 10, 100 lx), and then assessed immune function at multiple time points throughout adult life using haemolymph samples. We found that the presence of ALAN had a clear negative effect on haemocytes, while the effects on lytic activity and phenoloxidase activity were more complex or largely unaffected by ALAN. Furthermore, the effects of lifelong exposure to ALAN of 1 lx were comparable to those of 10 and 100 lx. Our data suggest that the effects of ALAN could be large and widespread, and such reductions in the core immune response of individuals will likely have greater consequences for fitness and survival under more malign conditions, such as those of the natural environment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address The School of BioSciences, Faculty of Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1672-9609 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30720239 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2196
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Author Rahman, S.A.; Bibbo, C.; Olcese, J.; Czeisler, C.A.; Robinson, J.N.; Klerman, E.B.
Title Relationship between endogenous melatonin concentrations and uterine contractions in late third trimester of human pregnancy Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume (up) in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health
Abstract In humans, circulating levels of the hormone melatonin and the initiation of spontaneous labor are both higher at night than during the day. Since activation of uterine melatonin receptors can stimulate human in vitro uterine contractions and these receptors are only expressed on the uterine tissue of women in labor, we hypothesized that circulating melatonin concentrations would affect uterine contractions in vivo. We evaluated the impact of light-induced modulation of melatonin secretion on uterine contractions in women during late third-trimester (~36-39 weeks) of pregnancy in two inpatient protocols. We found a significant (p<0.05) positive linear association between circulating melatonin concentrations and the number of uterine contractions under both protocols. On average, uterine contractions increased between 1.4 to 2.1 contractions per 30 minutes for every 10 pg/ml*h increase in melatonin concentration. These findings have both basic science and clinical implications for pregnant women, since endogenous melatonin levels and melatonin receptor activity can be altered by light and/or pharmaceutical agents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30739346 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2203
Permanent link to this record