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Author Yang, Y.; Liu, Q.; Wang, T.; Pan, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light pollution disrupts molecular clock in avian species: A power-calibrated meta-analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume (up) in press Issue Pages 114206  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Nighttime lighting is an increasingly important anthropogenic environmental stress on plants and animals. Exposure to unnatural lighting environments may disrupt circadian rhythm. However, studies involved in molecular biology, e.g. disruption of molecular circadian clock by light pollution, always have a small sample sizes. The small sample sizes result in a low statistical power and difficulties in replicating prior results. Here, a power-calibrated meta-analysis was developed to overcome these weakness. The results demonstrated that effect size of 2.48 in clock genes induced by artificial light would promised the reproducibility of the results as high as 80%. Long wavelength light entrained the positive core clock genes and negative core clock genes with robust circadian rhythmic expression, whereas some of those genes, e.g. cClock, cCry1, cCry2, cPer2, and cPer3, were arrhythmic in short wavelength light. Artificial light entrained the transcriptional-translational feedback loop of molecular clock in a wavelength-dependent manner. The expression positive core clock genes (cBmal1, cBmal2 and cClock), cAanat gene and melatonin were the greatest in short wavelength light and the lowest in long wavelength light. However, for negative regulators of molecular clock (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3), the greatest were in long wavelength light and the lowest were in short wavelength light. Our study opens up new opportunities to understand and strengthen conclusions based on the studies with small sample sizes and provides further insight about the disrupting in circadian rhythm by short wavelength light. Especially, the global lighting is shifting from “yellow” sodium lamps toward blue-enriched “white” light-emitting diodes (LEDs).  
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  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2852  
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Author Ściężor, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of clouds on the brightness of the night sky Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer  
  Volume (up) in press Issue Pages 106962  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract Clouds are a kind of atmospheric factor that most effectively scatters the artificial light coming from the ground. Therefore, they have the most significant impact on the brightness of the night sky. The paper analyses the influence of both the level of cloudiness, as well as the genera of clouds and altitude of its base, on amplifying of the light pollution. The impact of cloudiness on the brightness of the night sky in places with different levels of light pollution was researched. Measurements of meteorological elements were used together with clouds genera assessments. The introduction of an innovative method of identifying some genera of clouds on the base of the all-night continuous measurements of the sky's brightness allowed for a similar analysis in the absence of observational data specifying the genera of clouds.

A linear correlation between the cloudiness and the brightness of the night sky was found. The determined linear correlation parameters allow for specifying the three types of light-polluted areas, possibly related to the density of population. It was found that among the nine genera of the identified night clouds, the Altocumulus, Cirrocumulus, and Cumulonimbus ones are responsible for this correlation. No dependence of the brightness of the night sky on the clouds’ albedo was found. In case of overcast sky, there was a clear relationship between the average altitude of the individual genus of clouds and the brightness of the night sky. Most of the night sky brightness comes from the light scattered on the lowest altitude clouds genera, while the least contribution comes from the light scattered on the high-level clouds. It was also found that at the freezing temperatures, the layer of aerosols forms below the level of the genera Nimbostratus or Stratus. This layer, thickening with the decreasing temperature, additionally scatters the artificial light.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2859  
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Author Bumgarner, J.R.; Walker, W.H. 2nd; Liu, J.A.; Walton, J.C.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night exposure induces cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in male mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume (up) in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Allodynia; Hyperalgesia; Light at Night; Neuroinflammation; Opioid; Pain  
  Abstract The growing presence of artificial lighting across the globe presents a number of challenges to human and ecological health despite its societal benefits. Exposure to artificial light at night, a seemingly innocuous aspect of modern life, disrupts behavior and physiological functions. Specifically, light at night induces neuroinflammation, which is implicated in neuropathic and nociceptive pain states, including hyperalgesia and allodynia. Because of its influence on neuroinflammation, we investigated the effects of dim light at night exposure on pain responsiveness in male mice. In this study, mice exposed to four days of dim (5 lux) light at night exhibited cold hyperalgesia. Further, after 28 days of exposure, mice exhibited both cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. No heat/hot hyperalgesia was observed in this experiment. Altered nociception in mice exposed to dim light at night was concurrent with upregulated interleukin-6 and nerve growth factor mRNA expression in the medulla and elevated mu-opioid receptor mRNA expression in the periaqueductal gray region of the brain. The current results support the relationship between disrupted circadian rhythms and altered pain sensitivity. In summary, we observed that dim light at night induces cold hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, potentially through elevated central neuroinflammation and dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506 United States  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32201267 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2864  
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Author Andreatta, G.; Tessmar-Raible, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The still dark side of the moon: molecular mechanisms of lunar-controlled rhythms and clocks Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal J Mol Biol  
  Volume (up) in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Review; Animals; Hormones; Lunar rhythms; Physiology; Proteome; Transcriptome  
  Abstract Starting with the beginning of the last century, a multitude of scientific studies has documented that the lunar cycle times behaviors and physiology in many organisms. It is plausible that even the first life forms adapted to the different rhythms controlled by the moon. Consistently, many marine species exhibit lunar rhythms, and also the number of documented “lunar-rhythmic” terrestrial species is increasing. Organisms follow diverse lunar geophysical/astronomical rhythms, which differ significantly in terms of period length: from hours (circalunidian and circatidal rhythms) to days (circasemilunar and circalunar cycles). Evidence for internal circatital and circalunar oscillators exists for a range of species based on past behavioral studies, but those species with well-documented behaviorally free-running lunar rhythms are not typically used for molecular studies. Thus, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely obscure: the dark side of the moon. Here we review findings which start to connect molecular pathways with moon-controlled physiology and behaviors. The present data indicate connections between metabolic/endocrine pathways and moon-controlled rhythms, as well as interactions between circadian and circatidal/circalunar rhythms. Moreover, recent high-throughput analyses provide useful leads towards pathways, as well as molecular markers. However, for each interpretation it is important to carefully consider the – partly substantially differing – conditions used in each experimental paradigm. In the future, it will be important to use lab experiments to delineate the specific mechanisms of the different solar- and lunar-controlled rhythms, but to also start integrating them together, as life has evolved equally long under rhythms of both sun and moon.  
  Address Max Perutz Labs, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna; Research Platform “Rhythms of Life”, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna. Electronic address: kristin.tessmar@mfpl.ac.at  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-2836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32198116 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2865  
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Author Zhang, F.-S.; Wang, Y.; Wu, K.; Xu, W.-Y.; Wu, J.; Liu, J.-Y.; Wang, X.-Y.; Shuai, L.-Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of artificial light at night on foraging behavior and vigilance in a nocturnal rodent Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume (up) In press Issue Pages 138271  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night has greatly changed the physical environment for many organisms on a global scale. As an energy efficient light resource, light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been widely used in recent years. As LEDs often have a broad spectrum, many biological processes may be potentially affected. In this study, we conducted manipulated experiments in rat-proof enclosures to explore the effects of LED night lighting on behavior of a nocturnal rodent, the Mongolian five-toed jerboa (Allactaga sibirica). We adopted the giving-up density (GUD) method and camera video trapping to study behavioral responses in terms of patch use, searching efficiency and vigilance. With the presence of white LED lighting, jerboas spent less time in patches, foraged less intensively (with higher GUDs) and became vigilant more frequently, while their searching efficiency was higher than under dark treatment. Although both positive and negative effects of LEDs on foraging were detected, the net effect of LEDs on jerboas is negative, which may further translate into changes in population dynamics, inter-specific interaction and community structure. This is the first study to explore the effects of LED lighting on foraging behavior and search efficiency in rodents with the potential positive effects of using artificial light regimes as a pest management tool.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2877  
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